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Stabiae, Archeological Site Near Herculaneum, Anyone Been There?

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I am traveling to the Amalfi Coast in mid-September and staying in Naples for two nights. In 2004, at the National Museum of Natural History in D.C., I saw an exhibit called: In Stabiano, Exploring The Ancient Seaside Villas of the Roman Elite, which showcased magnificent frescoes and artificats.
If anyone has visited Stabiae, I would appreciate hearing about their experience.
Many thanks!

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    Greater Naples is awash with undervisited archaeological sites, many particularly interesting because of what the 79 AD eruption - or more precisely, the 1700 years of non-interference the eruption caused - preserved.

    The Stabiae complex is just one of them. Like all Neapolitan sites, it's good for wall paintings but almost totally devoid of other artefacts (even the better mosaics have been taken to the central museum for safety and preservation). Like all apart from Pompeii and Herculaneum, it's tricky to navigate round without a really good guidebook, and even with a decent book, working out what everything was used for can be very frustrating.

    Access to the complex is free with most versions of the Artecard: a pass allowing access to the regional transport system combined with most major cultural sites. But Stabiae is virtually impossible to get to except by car (and even with a decent map, finding it is a complicated by Italy's appalling road signage. Does its useless government do anything with the money we pour into it except siphon it off to pay for its presidents' hookers?). It IS accessible by train and foot, but the walk takes a good while (http://www.herculaneum.ox.ac.uk/?q=stabiae) Even in mid-Sep, hilly suburban walking in Naples is nackering (I formed this opinion when I was 18: few of us are any fitter now than we were at that age)

    Only the Villa San Marco and the Villa Arianna seem accessible: the guides on site I found close to useless (my Italian's about as good as any native English speaker's ever is and, for archaeology, rather better than the Italian guide's)

    Many people are nervous about driving out from Naples. Neapolitan traffic's nowhere near as terrifying as it's depicted, but it's still not for every English-speaking driver.

    It's unclear how familiar you are with Naples. I honestly don't think you've got time to bother with Stabiae unless you've already fully familiarised yourself with the national museum and Pompeii/Herculaneum. It wouldn't be my first choice of secondary sites, either: I'd go for Oplontis or Paestum any day.

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