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St Patricks Day - Where in Ireland should we spend it?

St Patricks Day - Where in Ireland should we spend it?

Old Oct 29th, 2009, 10:20 AM
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St Patricks Day - Where in Ireland should we spend it?

We will be in Ireland for St Patrick's Day, 2010, somewhere between Dublin and Shannon. Where would be a good place for my 17 year old niece and I to spend it? Any suggestions?
auntandneice is offline  
Old Oct 29th, 2009, 10:41 AM
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*pulls up deckchair*

*opens popcorn*

[you'll soon see what I mean].

ps I can't help. I just like to watch these threads.
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Old Oct 29th, 2009, 11:40 AM
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What does that mean? I am in for something good or bad??
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Old Oct 29th, 2009, 11:43 AM
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Up until a few years ago St Patrick's Day was a religious day with going to church, then the menfolk went to the pub.

Then they imported the American "St Patty's Day"...
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Old Oct 29th, 2009, 11:59 AM
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Oh - I see. What did the womenfolk do?
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Old Oct 29th, 2009, 01:59 PM
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The women did what women are supposed to do: stayed home and prepared dinner.
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Old Oct 29th, 2009, 04:53 PM
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Hmm - ok.. Thanks
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Old Oct 30th, 2009, 02:12 AM
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Dublin will have its usual Parade with several U.S. groups participating. One year when I was there, a Mummers String Band from Philadelphia was in the Parade. I met some of them at a Pub in Ballina (Mayo) later.

Galway and Ennis are usually good bets but I don't know of any Parades or other Special Events other than Religious: Maybe it would be a good day to do Croagh Patrick (County Mayo, not far from Galway). 17-year-old niece might be persuaded to climb the "mountain."

Personally, I would go to Ennis and to Cruise's Restaurant & Pub and enjoy impromptu Trad Irish Music sessions.
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 05:26 AM
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Pah! epic fail!
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 06:56 AM
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We were in Galway 4yrs ago for St Patrick's Day and they had next to nothing in celebrations. We spent the evening in a pub playing cards. It had a few decorations, not much. Later in the evening they had some Irish music but I think that was normal for the pub anyway,not just for St Patrick's Day. No green beer, nothing like the U.S. It was/is a religious holiday. I did read that the only place that does the celebration thing is Dublin and I think I remember seeing parts of the parade in Dublin on the TV.
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 07:43 AM
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Celebrate in South Boston ! LOL
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 01:15 PM
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OK, just to cheer CW up:

Why does any of this surprise Americans?

Americans don't wave flags, or find terrorists claiming the US government's illicit, invited to the Presidents' Palace in foreign countries on the feast of America's patron saint (officially, December 8, according to the Holy See, though it's not a date anyone with half a brain would commemorate).

Nor do the English on the feast of their patron saint. Or the French or Italians on theirs,

Americans - for reasons no-one's ever explained - make a fuss of Irishness on March 17. Why would the Irish? There's nothing special, or odd, about having Irish ancestors in Ireland

Now there's a very great deal odd about US Presidents inviting mass murderers, who believe the Irish government are all traitors, to the White House every March 17. But for some reason, Americans of a certain sort are more interested in finding American sentimental claptrap in Ireland than in stopping their government's consistent support of Irish politicians who still officially advocate the violent overthrow of the Irish Republic's legitimate government.

This might be a good time for another popcorn order, CW
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 01:30 PM
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Wherever you are, go to a local pub, look for a local parade...The small town celebration we saw several years neaqr Kinsale seemed to be a mix of patriotic and religious. No one wearing green, no commercialization. Live shamrocks were pinned on coats like a boutinerre. Sorry to hear its changed to be more like the US. Our flight over was full of police bands from the US who were marching in Dublin.
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 03:09 PM
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Auntandneice - I am sorry to see that there are some who instead of posting helpful information to your question, post nonsense. I enjoyed my trip to Ireland very much and am proud of my Irish roots. It is my understanding that St. Patrick's Day in Ireland is more low key, but that shouldn't stop you from having a fabulous time!!! Per HappyTrvlr's advice about Kinsale, that soulds like it could be fun and Kinsale is beautiful. Have fun and I shall look forward to hopefully hearing about your adventures in a trip report!
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 03:55 PM
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Nancy_W wrote: "I am sorry to see that there are some who instead of posting helpful information to your question, post nonsense."

What nonsense? If you wish to get things back on what you think should be the track, then you should note OP's original request and not suggest Kinsale as a good point "between Shannon and Dublin".

auntandneice, you are unlikely to get a helpful response with such a limited brief. The big parade is in Dublin, and has become very American in character. Most other towns put on smaller parades -- sometimes very small, and often embarrassingly poor in quality. Younger Irish people, and many of their elders, tend to spend a lot of the day in the pub getting smashed out of their minds. It's one day that I would never enter a pub, but maybe that merely tells you that I am boringly sensible (or just boring).

In sum, the big show is in Dublin, but it's a bit phony; the other shows are unreliable in quality. Now it's down to what you and your niece are like.
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 04:46 PM
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Unless your niece will be 18 by March 17, 2010, she won't have much fun, no matter where you guys will go (i.e. no pints in pubs).

An alternative to the party in Dublin could be the Skyfest which in 2008 was in Cashel (between Dublin and Shannon), and this year in Waterford (not exactly between Dublin and Shannon). And I have no clue where it will be held in 2010.

Besides those two big ones, I rarely noticed a big fuss being made because of March 17. Climbing Croagh Patrick (mountain) is more a thing you do in July (with thousands of others).
Getting smashed out of ones' minds in the pub is not the worst thing to do on St Patrick's Day (or any day) in Dublin, but being from Bavaria, I have a certain understanding for that kind of habits. But Temple Bar is definetely too crowded for my taste on March 17 to have some decent fun.
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Old Oct 31st, 2009, 05:56 PM
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My goodness! It seems that there are a few who have never once gotten out of the right side of the bed. How sad really.
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Old Nov 1st, 2009, 04:22 AM
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I've eaten all my popcorn. Poor show.
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Old Nov 1st, 2009, 06:08 AM
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There are are lot of people in the US of English origin.
Perhaps they should have a parade on St. George's day with busty wenches dressed as bar-maids and mini-skirted beafeaterettes.
They might even import some decent beer for the day.
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Old Nov 1st, 2009, 11:55 AM
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And now I must propose a St. David's Day celebration for all of us whose surnames end in "s."
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