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"Smart casual dress code" for teens in the UK

"Smart casual dress code" for teens in the UK

Aug 13th, 2005, 08:19 PM
  #1  
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"Smart casual dress code" for teens in the UK

A dinner-theatre combo that I bought on Lastminute.com has a "smart casual dress code". I have no doubt I can manage this on my own, but I'm a bit concerned about my 14-year-old. She has some very interesting ensembles, and I don't want to go overboard on being conservative in this respect if not necessary. So what is the minimum that would fit this requirement?

The restaurant in question is Maxwell's.
WillTravel is offline  
Aug 13th, 2005, 08:34 PM
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Simple. Tell her that the venue says the requested attire is "smart-casual", then let her handle it herself.

14 isn't so young anymore.
Nimrod is offline  
Aug 13th, 2005, 08:36 PM
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WillTravel - Maxwell's is an 'American' restaurant that caters to families. I don't think you have to worry too much about your DD dress.

If you're still worried, then no ripped jeans and no shorts.

IMHO, if you can't wear 'interesting ensembles' when you're 14 - when can you?
alya is offline  
Aug 13th, 2005, 08:42 PM
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In this case (we're talking about a glorified burger joint, for crying out loud!), the code is - as you'll see as you pass the diners on the terrace- non-existent.

The minimum requirements are merely that she shouldn't be arrested for indecency. Though on a busy Friday night, when the office parties there are in full spate, you'll see this is honoured more in the breach than in the observance.

Lastminute.com is winding you up.
flanneruk is offline  
Aug 13th, 2005, 09:24 PM
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The latest thing for some seems to be jeans that ride about as low as you can possibly get them on the hips without falling all the way down. We saw this in Europe..all OVER Europe..a couple of weeks ago; mostly on females but on some males as well.

I honestly wonder if "smart casual" and 14 y.o. are somewhat oxymoronic and totally irrelevant...if you haven't been able to change the way she dresses by now, with YOUR money, I'd go with the flow and allow her to continue to be "creative."
Intrepid1 is offline  
Aug 13th, 2005, 09:56 PM
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I would not give it ANY thought. Whatever she would wear at TGIFriday's, Red Lobster, Elephant Bar, Chili's or any similar chain in the States will be totally OK. Friday's is a pretty close comparison - Nachos/burgers/potato skins/ribs - that sort of thing

My question really is -- why are you going someplace like an American chain restaurant for a special night out?

But what's done is done . . . . .
janis is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 12:30 AM
  #7  
 
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maybe i'm misunderstanding the OP or the nature of this "combo" but perhaps the "smart casual" suggestion is related more to the theatre element than the restaurant. this seems more likely as the standard dress in london theatre is what i would describe as "smart casual".

To be clear though, this is not a "dress code" as no london theatre would refuse entry based on dress (within reason, of course).
walkinaround is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 04:22 AM
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Virtually all teenage girls and young women in England are currently wearing ultra-low-rise jeans, low-slung gipsy/peasant skirts or mini skirts, all with huge belts. These are teamed with t-shirts, vest tops (usually with a couple of inches of flesh on show!) or pretty camisoles. Maybe a little shrug cardigan if chilly. Cowboy boots, converse sneakers, pumps or flipflop/thong sandals.

Take a walk down Oxford Street, look in TopShop, New Look, H&M, Primark - the hippest shops for teens, and that is pretty much what everyone is wearing. It is casual, but the jeans are easily dressed up with a silky camisole top for an evening out. Unless the jeans are seriously ripped or she is indecently exposed, she is not going to be turned away.

I think lm.com state smart casual to avoid the shorts and sunhat dress code, suitable for sightseeing by day but not really for a night out!

Anyway, have a great time!
julia_t is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 07:11 AM
  #9  
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Janis, we went for this deal because the dinner + tickets is cheaper than I can get the tickets on their own elsewhere.

Daughter fortunately doesn't go for the plumber's crack look. I'll just let her decide what to wear as usual.
WillTravel is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 07:25 AM
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I'm with Janis. I've walked by Maxwell's a hundred times and I always am reminded of TGIFridays, both in menu, and in the way the patrons are dressed. This is a non issue, unless your daugher is a nudist.

Too bad about that combination. I've found that you can do much better by getting half price theatre tickets and booking a decent restaurant for a pre-theatre menu and come out way ahead -- with a much better restaurant and menu choice.
Patrick is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 07:38 AM
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In this case, we're getting the Producers + dinner for 19.95 each. The Ticketmasters price for The Producers is 49 pounds per ticket, so even half-price would not come anywhere close. The KidsWeek promotion wasn't available for us, as we didn't have a UK address, but that would only have given us half-price tickets anyway.
WillTravel is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 09:03 AM
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"we're getting the Producers + dinner for 19.95 each. The Ticketmasters price for The Producers is 49 pounds per ticket"

Are you comparing apples to oranges? The top tickets to the Producers IS £49 - but ticket prices range from £10 up to £49 (and many prices in between) depending on the location. Do you know where your seats are? I doubt you are getting £49 seats w/ this promotion.
janis is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 09:42 AM
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Lastminute.com says "Best available seats". I looked again for our date (Aug. 26) and see that we could buy 20-pound balcony tickets, plus fee, from Ticketmaster, but no cheaper than that. So 19.95 pounds (no fee) for dinner + ticket doesn't seem so bad.

I can't see being that horrified by eating at a TGIF-like establishment (but then I've never been to TGIF). We get plenty of fine ethnic dining at home.
WillTravel is offline  
Aug 14th, 2005, 09:47 AM
  #14  
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Sorry, the "best available seats" is for other tickets we got - Theatre of Blood. No information about the Producers ticket seats, which probably means they are the low-end ones. But as I said, the 10-pound tickets don't seem to be available through Ticketmaster for my date anyway.
WillTravel is offline  
Aug 16th, 2005, 10:30 AM
  #15  
 
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I've used the lastminute combos myself and always found them a good deal. In most cases the ticket face value has been higher than the package price. £20 for The Producers and a meal ain't bad!
As for clothes, I wouldn't really worry.
nona1 is offline  
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