Sienna is not in Italy!

Jun 25th, 2010, 05:21 AM
  #21  
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ama22 - Siena is pronounced with a short n and Sienna with a longer n almost as of there are two - a bit like rolling an r except I don't know what is called with an n.

zeppole - I left Britain in the mid-sixties although I continued my education there until the early seventies. I studied Latin (not Italian), Italian history (especially il Risorgimento) and had many friends visiting Tuscany way before it became so popular. Never in those days was it referred to as Sienna, always Siena.

But since we are taking about Siena and Firenze or Florence or Florentia I will tell a little story.

For many centuries Florence and Siena battled between themselves with the dividing line between the two city states moving further or closer from the respective cities according to which had greater power. They finally agreed to settle their diferrences once and for all by agreeing that a horseman should set off from either city with the dividing line being ruled as where the two horsemen finally met on the Florence-Siena road. It was agreed that they should each set off when the cock crowed.

Now the Florentines have a reputation of being quite canny (furbo is the best word in Italian), a bit like the Napolitans. Well the Florentines starved their cockerel before the appointed date and due to hunger the cockerel crowed some time before daybreak. It is for this reason - or so the story goes - that the Florence-Siena boundary is much closer to Siena tha Florence!
nochblad is offline  
Jun 25th, 2010, 05:31 AM
  #22  
 
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nochblad,

You will have to take up the issue of the respectability of "Sienna" in the UK with flanneruk.

Maybe we should all just call it "Saina", like the Etruscans did (and while were at it, quit talking about "Tuscany" and at least say "Toscana" -- or how about Etruria)?
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Jun 25th, 2010, 05:49 AM
  #23  
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or calling Italy Enotria!
nochblad is offline  
Jun 25th, 2010, 05:54 AM
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Londres calling. Trying to get a boat on the Tamise.

More seriously, reading the English version of the Gazzetta this morning online, I saw that Italy had been beaten by a strange country called Slovacchia.
kerouac is online now  
Jun 25th, 2010, 06:30 AM
  #25  
 
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and if you didn't want Italians endlessly mispronouncing your name, you should sign yourself "chiroach" while here.
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Jun 25th, 2010, 06:32 AM
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Isn't that an insect from Illinois?
kerouac is online now  
Jun 25th, 2010, 06:59 AM
  #27  
 
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I wonder how they pronounce "tempest in a teapot" in St. Catherine's hometown?
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Jun 25th, 2010, 07:21 AM
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Ah yeh Siena with its raft of beuatiful burnt sienna hued Renaissance buildings

from Wiki:


Sienna, in and of itself, is sometimes referred to as "raw sienna", in order to differentiate it from "burnt sienna", which is a more common pigment than the raw form.

The name derives from the most notable Renaissance location for the earth, Siena, Italy, and is short for terra di Siena, "earth of Siena".>
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Jun 25th, 2010, 07:25 AM
  #29  
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Terra di Siena is commonly called ocra in Italian just to confuse everyone
nochblad is offline  
Jun 25th, 2010, 07:31 AM
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Wiki says:
OP shows a lack of information and made a bad error in chastising others!
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Jun 25th, 2010, 07:41 AM
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Terra di Siena is commonly called ocra in Italian just to confuse everyone

ocra is spelled okra in the southern USA and is commonly eaten, just to add to the confusion
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Jun 25th, 2010, 07:43 AM
  #32  
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Palenque - do not rely on Wiki. It is not the bible.

I dispute that Sienna is widely used to represent Siena as the city. Many reference books do not recognise it as such. I have mentioned the CIA but can add the Encyclopedia Britannica etc.

Although certainly not authoritative a simple Google search of the two throws up numerous references to Siena as a city but few if any references to Sienna as such but rather as the earth (terra di sienna/siena). Tons of references to Sienna Miller of course.

My posting was tongue in cheek ..... or not?
nochblad is offline  
Jun 25th, 2010, 07:46 AM
  #33  
 
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It may almost be time when responding to travel requests, to add a little FYI at the bottom

"Note: for Florence you will see Firenze, for Rome, Roma" etc...

I would ask the question to a new traveller...do you think road signs, airport screens,train schedules,etc are bilingual. What would most answer?
Michel_Paris is offline  
Jun 25th, 2010, 07:53 AM
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Sienna is not in Italy! | Europe Forum | Fodor's Travel Talk Forums
32 posts - 15 authors - Last post: 7 hours ago
I have noticed that many want to see Sienna on their trip to Italy. Sienna loves Italy and has been seen there on many occasions - remember ...
http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...t-in-italy.cfm

nochblad - the above Google search seems to confirm your take!
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Jun 25th, 2010, 09:41 AM
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Along similar lines, Firenze IS in Tuscany. How many people do you hear saying, "We want to go to Florence and Tuscany."

This is like saying you want to go to Manhattan and NY.
Gina817 is offline  
Jun 26th, 2010, 05:48 AM
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Hey! Illinois is not the only state which has "chiroach"
ama22 is offline  
Jun 26th, 2010, 06:20 AM
  #37  
 
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And anyone should know Amwythig is Shropshire_
avalon is offline  
Jun 26th, 2010, 07:15 AM
  #38  
 
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Sierra Nevada beer or mountains? BTW - the "tan Sierra" in Fargo was really "burnt umber"
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Jun 26th, 2010, 09:59 AM
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As long as LittleA mentioned Sierra Nevada, I'll point out that the mountain range in California is not "the Sierras" with a plural 's' on the end.
Jean is offline  
Jun 26th, 2010, 02:43 PM
  #40  
 
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Do we want to get started on Cinque Terra? instead of (le) Cinque Terre?

My favorite British transmogrification of Italian place names is Leghorn for Livorno. How the f--- did they ever get that one?
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