Scotland, Wales, and England July '98

Old Jan 1st, 1998, 08:23 PM
  #1  
Rob Kopman
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Scotland, Wales, and England July '98

My wife and I are going to Scotland, Wales, and England in July of '98. We plan to rent a car in London and drive spending most of our 2 weeks in Scotland. Any suggestions? I heard that they have "walking tours" in Scotland. Anyone out there have any info on them?
 
Old Jan 15th, 1998, 11:54 PM
  #2  
Ginger
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I would suggest that you book your hotel/B&Bs in advance as they fill up quickly in July due to school holidays. Request literature from any of the regional tourist boards and National Trust websites. There will be plenty of info. on local B&B/hotels in the tourist board booklets. Make sure you have a few bar/pub lunch and dinners, they are good value. Buy an A-Z road map booklet they are more detailed than any US map. Have a great time!
 
Old Jan 16th, 1998, 03:32 AM
  #3  
Ed
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I lived in England for a year, you can walk all over
Scotland, UK. Be sure to see Edinburgh
Military Tatoo is most of month of July at
Edinburgh festival. Tatoo is held at Edinburgh
Castle, regards, Ed
 
Old Jan 24th, 1998, 01:51 PM
  #4  
Dana
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I studied in Scotland for 6 months from January to June 1997. I suggest staying in bed and breakfasts while there. They are cheaper, and the people there are very hospitable, especially in Edinburgh. You should definitely hit the big cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. It is neat to see the contrast in the two. While in Edinburgh, I suggest seeing the Holyrood Palace and then if it is nice out, walking up the "Royal Mile" to Edinburgh Castle at the other end. This way, you get to see all the little shops and other 'wee' tourist attractions along the way. Princess Street in Edinburgh is great for shopping too. There is a beautiful gardens there on Princess Street to sit in. I suggest going to the "Marks and Spencer's" store a few blocks down, picking up some sandwiches and sitting in the park. The coast up gy St. Andrews is really pretty. If you go to St. Andrews, the castle and cathedral are good to see. Also put a few balls on the historic Old Course. The glens of Scotland are gorgeous, and July should be when the heather is in bloom. If you can drive through Glencoe you should. There's something about that mystical place that Touched me. It is gorgeous. If you have any questions about anything, feel free to e-mail me. I am more than happy to help!! You will fall in love with Scotland!!! Don't forget to have some pub grub and a few pints!!!
 
Old Jan 24th, 1998, 01:52 PM
  #5  
Dana
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I studied in Scotland for 6 months from January to June 1997. I suggest staying in bed and breakfasts while there. They are cheaper, and the people there are very hospitable, especially in Edinburgh. You should definitely hit the big cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. It is neat to see the contrast in the two. While in Edinburgh, I suggest seeing the Holyrood Palace and then if it is nice out, walking up the "Royal Mile" to Edinburgh Castle at the other end. This way, you get to see all the little shops and other 'wee' tourist attractions along the way. Princess Street in Edinburgh is great for shopping too. There is a beautiful gardens there on Princess Street to sit in. I suggest going to the "Marks and Spencer's" store a few blocks down, picking up some sandwiches and sitting in the park. The coast up gy St. Andrews is really pretty. If you go to St. Andrews, the castle and cathedral are good to see. Also put a few balls on the historic Old Course. The glens of Scotland are gorgeous, and July should be when the heather is in bloom. If you can drive through Glencoe you should. There's something about that mystical place that Touched me. It is gorgeous. If you have any questions about anything, feel free to e-mail me. I am more than happy to help!! You will fall in love with Scotland!!! Don't forget to have some pub grub and a few pints!!!
 
Old Jan 24th, 1998, 04:03 PM
  #6  
Bob Ricks
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Edinburgh is not to be missed. Glascow,,ho hum. Take a bus tour of Eburgh to get a good feel of the area. Have you thought about flying into Manchester instead of London? You could then drive through the lakes area....a beautiful area of lakes and stone walls and quaint towns. I recommend the Elim House in the lakes area...nice couple. You will definitely enjoy this area and it is on the way. Any other questions, shoot an email. B and B is the way to go in all of these areas. Try a Karen Brown book for excellent recommendations. They are in papaerback and always have good spots to stay all through Europe.
 
Old Jan 24th, 1998, 07:23 PM
  #7  
Karen
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We have been to Britain many times, each time driving from Gatwick Airport(alot easier than Heathrow). Personally, we no longer make reservations as the B&Bs are so difficult to find in the little villages or slightly larger towns...and when you have committed yourself to be there for your reservation you waste alot of time searching , and all the time you are passing by superb places that would suit the bill. We have found some of best places when we were just starting to get a little worried about finding a B&B...and, in July it is light till 10pm or so, so there is no need to stop at 5pm, unless you really want to. I think the Whiskey Trail is wonderful, both in scenery and stopping at a distillery or two. Inveness and Perth are both nice towns. It is also fun to watch fell races(running up and down the hills) and sheepherders with dogs moving the sheep from one field to another. Hiking is very big in all areas and you will see walkers of every age, many times with dog, on all the hills and mountains and through fields. Getting a good map is the first priority...four miles to the inch. You should have the phone number of the British Tourist Authority in your phone book or public library or phone information and order all the info. you want.
 
Old Jan 25th, 1998, 05:17 AM
  #8  
Lanny
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Please, please do yourselves a favour and do the Road to the Isles and over the sea to Skye. The rugged beauty of this area of Scotland cannot adequately be described but I can assure you it will haunt you and linger in your memory forever. As a plus, while hotels are in short supply in this area, virtually every homeowner also operates a little B & B so there is plenty of accommodation to chose from. Also, if you are descended from the brave men who fought to keep Scotland free then you must go to Culloden, walk the battlefield, examine the cairns. It is mystical. In terms of other areas, there is much to be done and seen in the Edinburgh area but for me at least give Glasgow a miss. You just don't have enough time to waste it on places of marginal interest.
 
Old Jan 31st, 1998, 03:49 AM
  #9  
Stephanie
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Hi! My husband and I went to Scotland last last September for 10 days and drove around the country. I agree with Dana. Spend some time in Edinburgh and walk down the Royal Mile to the Holyrood House. Princes St. has some nice shopping. We actually did go to Marks & Spencer's and bought some sandwiches, chips and a drink and sat at one of the benches overlooking the Princes Garden (park). It was great relaxing and people watching. Spend a day in Glasgow to see all the Charles Rennie Mackintosh sites. The House for an Art Lover is cool. The Malt Whisky Trail was interesting in that a.) I had never seen so much road kill in my life and b.) the production tours are interesting but the can be really stinky - my eyes turned red. Isle of Skye was beautiful (we had great weather). The drive from Ft. Augustus to te Isle of Skye was breathtaking (we left at 9:30am just to catch the fog burn off). The drive around Glencoe was also beautiful. If you need suggestions or have anyquestions, please feel free to e-mail me. Have a wonderful vacation.
 
Old Jan 31st, 1998, 07:43 AM
  #10  
Cindy
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Visit Oban on the west coast. From there, you can visit the Isles of Mull and Iona. There is a lot to do around Oban. We spent a day driving around with a map of ruins and saw the circular drawings that are believed to be about 5000 years old. Also climbed to the top of a hill that was a Pict fort and believed to be the place where the kings were crowned. From this vantage point we could see the sea, the canal, and a special treat of a herd of wild horses running across the moor. There were many standing stones and henges. And actually walked inside a burial cairn. These places were listed in a small book, they all had a sign to explain what you were seeing, and interestingly enough, many had native american sayings on them. You sometimes had to walk to through someone's pasture but the rules are simple, stay on the path and lock the gate! We had great seafood! The largest prawns I have ever seen and delicious queenies (scallops from a nearby island). I'm definitely going back.
 

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