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Question about renting a Paris apartment- the "Terms and Conditions"

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May 6th, 2009, 06:50 AM
  #1
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Question about renting a Paris apartment- the "Terms and Conditions"

Have been looking at apartments offered by the various companies often mentioned here. In reading through the Terms and Conditions that one must sign in order to rent, I notice that several of them include the wording that they may cancel and return the deposit, at any time, and have no further obligation.

Do people sign these contracts with that provision included? You could show up to check in, and for any reason- maybe they got a better offer? Maybe the owner's relatives want to stay? they can return your deposit.

I'm trying to figure out if people actually read what they're signing, sign off on this and just decide to not worry about it, or what?
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May 6th, 2009, 08:04 AM
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We have rented apartments 6 times, 3 in Paris and 3 in Italy. Yes, we have signed the T & C each time and yes, we have read and understood the document. The wording is very similar on all of the contracts we have signed. We have never had a problem. The interpretation that we have is that anything that might relate to the return of deposits would be an emergency with the apartments. We have clarified this with one of the rental agencies. They would try to put you an a similar apartment. So, I think if you have a problem signing, I would recommend discussion with the rental agency or owner.
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May 6th, 2009, 08:30 AM
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I have such a clause in the rental contract for my house in France. I've never used it. Think of the possibilities, though. What if my house burns down or there's a flood or it's damaged (s it once was by a huge piece of the cliff above falling onto my roof) and becomes unrentable. The clause is there to protect renters from an unavoidable situation; at least that's what I have it in there for. Of course, I would expect any property owner to do his best to make you other arrangements in such a case, insofar as that is possible.

But yes, you need to talk to the owners if you're concerned.
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May 6th, 2009, 08:30 AM
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I've rented apts. in Paris three times and do read the contracts. I don't remember that clause being in them. I just checked the most recent contract as I still have a copy of that and I don't see that clause anywhere in it. I don't rent from the usual companies you are probably dealing with, thouse (are they American?). I have only rented from French firms and the contracts are sort of the official French legal ones for renters. But I do read French and I don't see that clause anywhere.
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May 6th, 2009, 01:32 PM
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Actually, a couple of the contracts I saw this on were from French companies. Some of them say something like - in case of emergency, they'll work with you to find another place, etc. But one also says that it can be canceled at any time and monies returned, with no further obligation. Doesn't mention emergency, doesn't mention helping to find another location, etc.

I did ask about that, and how to make it a firm contract, and they answered that when I sent the deposit and signed the papers it would be a contract. A contract that includes that wording- not exactly what I meant!
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May 6th, 2009, 01:58 PM
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That does sound odd, what firms exactly are you talking about that are French and have that in their contract? In reality, if a place burnt down, of course they couldn't rent it to you, but I really didn't see that in the contract I had. The French contracts I had were very legalese, and quoted French law/regulations but I just didn't see anything about being able to cancel at any time with no further obligation.

I don't know what you mean though about asking how to make something a firm contract, their response is the same thing I would have said.
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