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-   -   Proposed electronics ban and questions about my Kindle (https://www.fodors.com/community/europe/proposed-electronics-ban-and-questions-about-my-kindle-1301712/)

NewbE Jun 8th, 2017 07:44 AM

Good advice, I agree that it's important to learn how to take the hard drive out. It's not difficult, just sort of psychologically daunting if you've never cracked open your laptop's shell before.

And I respectfully disagree that there's nothing to worry about, because I think an electronics band could be enacted at any moment. Who knows??

amyb Jun 8th, 2017 09:14 AM

I agree that this is something to consider. Among safari-goers this is a huge problem because it would include cameras, including the large DSLRs that we tend to take with us as part of the safari experience, including ridiculously expensive lenses. Very little press has been given to that, but folks who were caught in Africa when the ban went into effect had to check their cameras in luggage for the hold (except for Turkish, which was bubble-wrapping them at the gate and giving claim checks for the other end, but your camera was still getting checked). If this ban goes into effect beyond the already stipulated countries, this means ANY camera larger than your phone will need to be checked, so photogs at the very least should stay on top of this. As recently as 5/28, Kelly said that this ban could end up being extended both ways, in and out of the US to or from any other country.

scrb11 Jun 8th, 2017 11:12 AM

Latest story I heard is that Kelly is still considering this.

There's talk that the only way electronics will be allowed on the plane is if each item goes through the scanners on their own tray and they swab it.

I dealt with that in Barcelona, on a short flight to Paris, I had to remove my lenses, cameras, iPad and laptop. Was a huge PITA to re-pack afterwards.

Was worried about losing something.

Once in Munich, they had me remove my lenses, remove the back and front caps, so they could look through it to make sure it was a functioning lens.

Andrew Jun 8th, 2017 11:25 AM

I've had to unpack all my electronics a few times now going through airport security in Europe. A PITA, but if you leave yourself extra time, not the end of the world.

I won't be going overseas again until next year, so I'm not going to worry about this now. We'll just see what they come up with and then I'll have to deal with it then. For now, it's all just speculation. I read reports while I was in Europe in May that this electronics ban was a done deal even for May so I'd need to deal with it before I came home, but that never happened. And this may never happen, either.

At least I know now that, next time, I won't need to take my DSLR with me! This last trip in May I did without it, so at least there will be less to pack. I wouldn't want to worry about packing those expensive lenses in a checked bag for sure. My biggest worry with my new Lumix might be that it gets damaged on the way over and that I won't have a working camera over there! And I can't remove the lens from my Lumix, so I'll have to pack it very carefully. May need a bigger bag than I'm used to. Would be a PITA, but I'd manage.

massimop Jun 8th, 2017 11:30 AM

In some airports around the world passengers are required to turn their electronic devices on and off and on again in front of security personnel to prove that the device has not been gutted & turned into a weapon.

So while you might want to learn how to remove your hard drive just because it's a good thing to know, you might have problems at security if certain types of measures are enacted.

Andrew Jun 8th, 2017 11:30 AM

As far as laptop security, another approach might be to setup a remote computer back home (with Windows or whatever) that has all of your files...and travel with only a dumb laptop with no files on it. Just VPN into your home PC remotely and connect to it via remote desktop. Nothing is stored on your traveling laptop, so there is nothing to worry about in regards to it being stolen. You won't be able to work on a plane this way though (even with WiFi on a plane, probably way too slow to work with remote desktop). But you can work remotely from overseas this way with minimal worry about the security of your documents.

Andrew Jun 8th, 2017 12:13 PM

massimop: <i>In some airports around the world passengers are required to turn their electronic devices on and off and on again in front of security personnel to prove that the device has not been gutted & turned into a weapon.</i>

Not in years that I've traveling to Europe have I needed to do that. I remember after 9/11 I had to turn on my DSLR at a US airport once, because DSLRs were still pretty new. Maybe outside of Europe this is more common.

<i>So while you might want to learn how to remove your hard drive just because it's a good thing to know, you might have problems at security if certain types of measures are enacted.</i>

Well, the laptop presumably is checked so you won't need to turn that on. A laptop hard drive is small, about the size of a smart phone. Without a power source there is no way to turn it on - and even if you can, you can't see anything - you can maybe hear it spin up. We'll just have to see what rules they have for random electronics if and when a future ban on laptops and electronics is put into place. I'm sure it will be confusing at first. I suppose it could be as extreme as "no electronics, PERIOD, except your phone and these small tablets, etc." Wait and see!

greg Jun 9th, 2017 09:01 AM

>>> In some airports around the world passengers are required to turn their electronic devices on and off and on again in front of security personnel to prove that the device has not been gutted & turned into a weapon.

I had just been asked last week at the KRK airport security to start up my chromebook to prove that it was a computer.

>>> As far as laptop security, another approach might be to setup a remote computer back home (with Windows or whatever) that has all of your files...and travel with only a dumb laptop with no files on it.

Chromebook operates this way. You can also enable syncing offline contents (must of google file types) so that you can read and edit the content while in airplane mode. The locally available data is encrypted even if the computer is stolen. You still have access to your data in the cloud and the data on the stolen PC is encrypted.

However, as I mentioned previously, a chromebook usage model differs significantly from the PCs or the MACs. You need to test if your usage model can be adopted to a chromebook many weeks before your trip. You would need to manage what contents go into internal storage (encrypted) which is a mirror image of your google drive, needs to be converted from non-google file to google type, e.g. MS-Word to Google-doc, what can go into unencrypted SD card if the chromebook has an SD card slot.

If I ever have to check my chromebook or camera, I would pop out all the SD cards from these devices into my pocket before handing my devices to the luggage handlers.


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