Pronounce Trastevere

Old Mar 15th, 2007, 06:55 AM
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Pronounce Trastevere

All, I was wondering if anyone could give me a phanetic (sp) spelling for this area of Rome, Trastevere. I have heard the middle 'e' have both a soft and hard sound. Knowing this would be extremely helpful.
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 07:00 AM
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Hi Calto - The middle 'e' is emphasised

Tras-TEH-ve-reh

Steve
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 09:41 AM
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I'd say Trass-TAY-ver-ray. Tevere is Italian for Tiber, so Trastevere means "across the Tiber River."
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 11:15 AM
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And I'd pronounce it tras-TEV-ah-ray.
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 11:50 AM
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hi, all -

can you settle a family argument about how to pronounce "Fiesole"?

I have always thought it was "fiEsole", the family say it's "fieSOle".

regards, ann
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 11:53 AM
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my mothers neighbor is from Fiesole. she says FEE EH SOUL A.
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 11:53 AM
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Annhig, I think you are the winner
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 11:54 AM
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THAT "A" SOUNDS LIKE ITSELF NOT "AH"
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Old Mar 15th, 2007, 01:50 PM
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We stayed in Trastevere, and everyone there pronounced it
Trahs TEH veh (d)ray
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Old Mar 16th, 2007, 02:26 AM
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Hi Ann - You win. Take the money and run

Fee-EH-sol-eh

or

Fee-AY-sol-ay

Eurogals - Tell your mother's neighbour she's got a funny accent

Steve
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Old Mar 16th, 2007, 07:10 AM
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thanks, all -

it's great to be able to say "I told you so"!

regards, ann
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Old Mar 16th, 2007, 07:16 AM
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It's quite simple: there is NEVER any "e" in Italian that's being pronounced AY. This is ALWAYS a mistake that makes it hard to understand for an Italian what you might mean.
The sound of each E in Trastevere is like the E in "rest", just that the first of the three Es, like Steve put it, is being emphasised, and slightly longer than the two others.
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Old Mar 16th, 2007, 03:28 PM
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franco, that depends upon which part of Italy you are from. My Italian teacher (native Roman) definitely pronounced many an "e" like "ay." Not as drawn out as we'd say "they," but not "eh" either.

Le due sorelle sono gentile.
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Old Mar 16th, 2007, 05:38 PM
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Lucie - le due sorelle sono gentiLI! You're right in a sense that some Italian dialects would pronounce some Es as kind of an AY - Neapolitans, always tending to distort vowels, would pronounce some Es like that... for example the final E of chiagnere (standard Italian: piangerai). But you wouldn't want to learn a dialect, would you?, and above all, you wouldn't succeed at all... foreigners trying to speak local dialects are sounding ridiculous in every language. And if your teacher was a native Roman, he wouldn't pronounce any E like AY - lingua toscana in bocca romana, the Roman way of pronounciation is THE classic model of the Italian standard language! What you might be trying to describe by "AY, but not as in they" will quite certainly be a very open E, like in cielo... but the typical English-speaking way of "translating" this vowel into AY accounts for a typical English accent, sorry. There is certainly no EE-ish sound in that vowel... it's just no English vowel. It would be easier to explain if you happened to speak some Hungarian (the unaccented Hungarian E is very similar to that sound), or Finnish, or even German (both languages would translate that sound, acoustically, into &Auml. My best advice is: get yourself some opera CDs, recitals of singers with a good pronounciation, not singing any dialect; i.e. not Giuseppe di Stefano for example, who always sings with a terrible Sicilian accent, but, say, Franco Bonisolli, or Alessandro Ziliani (both have an exemplary diction), and listen, listen, listen...
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