Prescription meds...and security

Old Mar 9th, 2008, 12:12 PM
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Prescription meds...and security

Due to several health issues, I use a LOT of prescribed ointments.

Some of them are compounded, some of them steroids.

In total, there are 5 tubes of meds I will have to take with me, not counting pills (which I'm not worried about)...ohhhh, the joys of autoimmune disease.

Anyway, my fear is losing my ointments (which would equal a nightmare...no a hellacious trip for me).

I don't want to put them in the checked bag for fear of them being lost in a lost luggage incident, so I want to bring them on my carryon.

The issue is that the labels for the scrips are on the boxes the tubes come in. Not many of those boxes will fit in a quart size baggie.

My thought is to bring the ointments in a bag, and have a bag with them, with the boxes flattened? Is that the best way?

Should I get a note from my physician (s) stating what they are for...the compounded steroids, etc?

Going to Ireland and then Italy.

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

MY DIL had to go buy a baggie they were selling for $1 a bag when her lip gloss was determined to be of danger...I can't imagine what all those tubes will do.

Also thought of putting the compounded stuff in a contact case and leaving it in my purse???

It's not like I can NOT have these things. They have to be where I can get to them, daily.

Thank you so much,

Karen
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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 12:16 PM
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the TSA website has the info you need.

www.tsa.gov/311/

"Declare larger liquids. Medications, baby formula and food, breast milk, and juice are allowed in reasonable quantities exceeding three ounces and are not required to be in the zip-top bag. Declare these items for inspection at the checkpoint."

I don't see a need to bring the actual boxes - you could also get a copy of the Rx from your pharmacy to carry along with the tubes.
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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 12:20 PM
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You should look up the website for the airport you're flying out of- it will have all the regulations regarding liquids, gels, etc. and for prescriptions.

What size are the ointment tubes? Are they larger than 100ml? If they're 100ml or less, I would just put them in the regulation size baggie and not worry about the prescription labels. I've never had anyone scrutinize what was in my liquids ziplock, they just take a quick look to make sure the contents fit the regulation size.
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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 12:25 PM
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Hi Karen, here is the section of the TSA website regarding medications. Have a wonderful time in Ireland and Italy!

http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtrav...rial_1059.shtm
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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 02:45 PM
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Hi lk.

As noted, put all of your tubes in your carryon in a big plastic bag.

You can make photocopies of the Rx labels or flatten the boxes.

Declare your medications as you get to the security gate.

Enjoy your visit.

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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 02:51 PM
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prescription liquid/gel meds do not go in the 3-1-1 ziplok baggie (3 oz or less, 1 qt. 1 baggie per person). They must be screened of course but do not need to fit in w/ all the cosmetics/mouthwash/toothpaste in the baggie.

Also you do not need the boxes at all. You can cut the label parts off the boxes and place them in a plastic bag w/ the tubes. You will not have a problem.
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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 03:01 PM
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You do not need the boxes. Go to the pharmacy where you purchased the medications and ask them for a printed list. Take that with you in the unlikely event that security will ask for it.
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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 03:04 PM
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yes - a printed list will work too. But if you have the boxes already you can just use the labels off of them. Whatever you do, DON'T put the meds in your checked luggage.
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Old Mar 9th, 2008, 04:42 PM
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Agree with above. Put all your meds in one plastic bag, and carry that in a separate section/zipper compartment of your carry on/tote bag.

Also good idea to have doctor write prescriptions, with generic name if possible - just in case you lose/leave something somewhere - and keep those separately from your meds.

It's best to keep your meds in a bag you will not forget during your travels and return them after each use, as opposed to anywhere in your hotel room (especially a drawer).
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 02:15 AM
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yes good idea and a good post
you can be caught out so its best that your GP writes a note and states whatever he needs to to make it perfectly legal for you to carry your ointments
i agree..it would be nerve wracking thinking they may confiscate something vital
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 03:44 AM
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I don't know if this is available thru your US doctor or auto club, but I can get a "medication passport" from the equivalent of your AAA.
It states the illnesses and the medications, and translates both into most "world languages", and gets signed by your GP.

It may also be helpful if your doctor does not only state the (generic) names of your medication but also your illnesses against which these drugs are in its latin original. Thus, it may be easier to communicate your needs to a local GP if you should need a prescription drug while in some Tuscany mountain village.

You should listen to others if they have any experience first, but I think that an US Rx only helps in getting a similar Rx when abroad -- but I doubt that a foreign pharmacy will give you prescription drugs in return for an American Rx. You may have to see a local doctor first.

Finally, many EU countries have stricter rules on what is prescription-only and what is OTC. So, if you also have to rely on OTC drugs, you may want to add those to your "drug list".
While general statements are often misleading, I would assume that in most countries OTC drugs are not sold in supermarkets or "drugstores", but in regular pharmacies. So, even when you just need Aspirin, you won't find that at the gas station or supermarket. This may differ from country to country, though.

Intra-EU travel follows the same guidelines as US-EU air travel: medication does not go into the "3-1-1 bag". Never had problems with that so far.
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 04:18 AM
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Thank you all for the advice, the links and the, well...support.

After looking at the TSA site and reading the following:

Additionally, we are continuing to permit prescription liquid medications and other liquids needed by persons with disabilities and medical conditions. This includes:

* All prescription and over-the-counter medications (liquids, gels, and aerosols) including KY jelly, eye drops, and saline solution for medical purposes;
* Liquids including water, juice, or liquid nutrition or gels for passengers with a disability or medical condition;
* Life-support and life-sustaining liquids such as bone marrow, blood products, and transplant organs;
* Items used to augment the body for medical or cosmetic reasons such as mastectomy products, prosthetic breasts, bras or shells containing gels, saline solution, or other liquids; and,
* Gels or frozen liquids needed to cool disability or medically related items used by persons with disabilities or medical conditions.

However, if the liquid medications are in volumes larger than 3 ozs each, they may not be placed in the quart-size bag and must be declared to the Transportation Security Officer. A declaration can be made verbally, in writing, or by a person's companion, caregiver, interpreter, or family member.

Declared liquid medications and other liquids for disabilities and medical conditions must be kept separate from all other property submitted for x-ray screening.


I will do just that. Have copies of the labels along with the tubes in a separate baggie, in my carry-on (janis j, after having lost luggage on a direct, non-stop flight...I learned to never leave anything really important in checked bags!)

Cowboy, I don't have the AAA type thing, but I am very close with all 4 of my docs, and they will write out the scrips or whatever I need, no problem...so thank you too for your suggestions. That AAA deal sounds pretty darn cool!

Trains in Italy and meds are my only two big concerns this trip. I think we got one licked, and the other, well...experience will likely take care of it.

Karen

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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 04:40 AM
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While it is a good idea to check the TSA website for USA requirements, keep in mind that other countries may have different requirements.
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 04:48 AM
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"breast milk, ... is allowed in reasonable quantities"
I spent the last minutes trying to figure out the procedure to evaluate the breast milk carried by a person.
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 04:51 AM
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And what is the measurement for reasonableness?
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 04:56 AM
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I'm definitely pizzled (sorry for multiple replies... this is the last one)
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 07:46 AM
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lobo_mau: assuming you are being serious - that is not talking about breast milk still in one's breasts

It is for those who use a breast pump to collect breast milk to feed the baby when breast feeding is not possible/convenient. So bottled breast milk is what is addressed by that . . . . .
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 07:53 AM
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When I get a prescription from Rite-Aid, there are 2 extra copies of the lables included. Have you checked the paperwork that is included with your prescrition?
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Old Mar 10th, 2008, 07:59 AM
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Ahhhhh... thank you so much... it makes much more sense now.
And I'm sure Fodors doesn't need a pictorial description about what passed through my mind during last few hours.
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