Petite Brasserie- Paris on Rue Cler

Apr 6th, 2007, 08:16 AM
  #21  
 
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<<We are not big on French food>>

I am always amused when I read a statement like this and am naturally curious as to what the person's perception is of "French food" and what prompts a statement like this.
Well BillT?
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Apr 6th, 2007, 08:38 AM
  #22  
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robjame:
Our favorite food is Chinese, followed by Japanese, Thai, Phillipino,Mexican.
We never eat French. We do however love croissants, cheese, crepes, pastry,baggettes. Also we are not wine drinkers- so we are going to Paris for the sights, some shopping, the experience but not the food and wine.
This probably explains why we have left Paris off our travel list for so long- we usually go to Asia or other European countries. Generally speaking we prefer the food of Asia and ceertainly the dollar goes a lot farther and the service is unbeatable. I'm not knocking the French food and wines- its just not our cup of tea!
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Apr 6th, 2007, 09:07 AM
  #23  
 
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In that you haven’t answered my question (and no reason why you should) let me explain my reason for asking . Most people who make statements like that have no real understanding of what French food is. Let me add, it is a very complex and difficult to define.
It has been said that French cuisine is characterized by its extreme diversity. In that, it can only be compared to Chinese cuisine or the cuisine of India.
In France you will find this diversity according to region. Different areas of France have food influenced by Belgium, Germany, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, etc. You will be happy to note that “exotic cuisines, particularly Chinese cuisine and Vietnamese cuisine and some dishes from former colonies in Northern Africa, have made inroads.”
BTW you will find some of the best Oriental food in the world in Paris. Go with an open mind and enjoy.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 09:17 AM
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robjame: I agree w/ you but don't think you are getting through. "We don't like French food" is like saying "we don't like American food".

"French" food includes MANY different types of cooking/dishes/ingredients/regional specialties, etc -- just like the food back home does.
janisj is online now  
Apr 6th, 2007, 09:26 AM
  #25  
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Well in all of the cooking shows and other times throughout the years where we have seen French food displayed, discussed, etc it is clear to us that it is not our cup of tea. The other problem is that we would not want to go a restaurant, be unsure about what we are in fact ordering only to discover that it was not what we thought it was going to be and then be diappointed and having to pay dearly for a meal we did not enjoy. The language barrier, the ability to change the way a dish is cooked, and the high prices tend to steer us to those items mentioned earlier or at least going to a place where we can see what it is we are ordering- therby minimizing the risk of getting something we did not bargain for.
BillT is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 09:36 AM
  #26  
 
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I think you should have whatever food you think you will enjoy. It's your vacation and your money.

That being said, given that you are in France, maybe you should try French food just once, perhaps in a bistro for lunch where you don't feel like you have to spend a lot of money. I love a place called Creperie de la Cluny on rue de l'harpe. I've had a great salad (l'harpe) and a glass of wine for under 10 Euros.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 09:48 AM
  #27  
 
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If you like eggs for breakfast plus a beautiful view, try Cafe Flore en Ile on the tip of Ile St Louis, behind Notre Dame.

There are excellent Japanese restaurants in the 2e, near the Bourse and the Passage St Anne. It's practically a little "Japantown." I also enjoyed eating in a Chinese restaurant not far from the Musee Rodin (I believe it has "Pekin" in the name. Sorry! Can't remember.)

If you've never tried Vietnamese food, do so in Paris, where it is very good and plentiful. (Vietnam was a French colony in the 50s).

Also, take a bit of time to peek into a Parisian creperie to see if anything appeals to you. Crepes in France can be somewhat heartier and more interesting than crepes in America. You will often wholemeal crepes, sometimes stuffed with scrambled eggs and ham and onions, with fresh fruits or syrups. Also, keep an eye out or ask around for Belgian bakeries or eateries, where if you are lucky, you'll find some nice fat waffles to satisfy your pancake urge.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 09:51 AM
  #28  
 
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Rick Steves also says that when the urge for big American breakfast hits him, he beats it into submission. I would do the same. You are liable to be diasappointed with what you get.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 09:57 AM
  #29  
 
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BillT,

You might find reading this useful:

feed://www.hotelsbycity.net/blog/eur_france_paris/author/parisblogger15/feed/
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Apr 6th, 2007, 10:11 AM
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PS:

I don't like American food (sorry janisj, but I dont!) and the last time I was in Paris, my limited budget resulted in my sticking to plats du jour, and I was struck at how unimaginative food has become in Paris.

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Apr 6th, 2007, 10:13 AM
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And just WHICH American food is that? My point was there are hundreds of different regional cuisines in the USA (like there are many in France)

janisj is online now  
Apr 6th, 2007, 12:55 PM
  #32  
 
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BillT, since you like asian food, you will find a large number of asian eateries in Paris. They are all over the city. Also, the Golden Arches are there too.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 01:23 PM
  #33  
 
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BBQ, fried meats, meat loafs, hot dogs, hamburgers, Thanksgiving turkey, lobster rolls, catfish, jello, cornflakes -- and I don't like American pizza, Tex Mex, chop suey, chow mein, Rice a Roni or cheesecake (or carrot cake). I don't even eat ham sandwiches! I avoid American "nouvelle" restaurants as much as I avoid diners. Sure, there's a lot of regional difference in what people eat in America, but very little of it anywhere is very good. It's better to eat in what are called "ethnic" restaurants.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 01:30 PM
  #34  
 
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Ok here is another question. My wife likes her coffee extremely weak- you can see thru it- sort of like hot water with a hint of coffee. What she does here in the states is order coffee with a cup or small pot of hot water and then she mixes to get the right consistency. Am I going to start the next French Revolution if I try to get this order at a cafe?


I'm sure you won't start a revolution, but I'm pretty sure you will get some strange looks. Geez, get with the program.
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Apr 6th, 2007, 01:39 PM
  #35  
 
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You are going out of your way to have an American breakfast in Paris? Recommended by dork Steves? Are you nuts? His book says about Petite Brasserie: "They offer a great deux pour douze breakfast deal for Rick Steves readers: two American breakfasts (normally € each) for &euro:12 total." Maybe he owns the place?





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Apr 6th, 2007, 01:40 PM
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Oops, should have hit the preview key instead of the post.

You are going out of your way to have an American breakfast in Paris? Recommended by dork Steves? Are you nuts? His book says about Petite Brasserie: "They offer a great deux pour douze breakfast deal for Rick Steves readers: two American breakfasts (normally €8 each) for €12 total." Maybe he owns the place?
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Apr 6th, 2007, 01:48 PM
  #37  
 
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Ha Ha! I too, suspect the coffee/water thing will be a problem.

And for what it's worth, Fall06, I agree with you, both about American food, (which is why I hardly ever go out to eat-I like my own cooking FAR better) and the food in Paris, although actually, I felt that way particularly in the late 90's in Paris-and think the food scene may be getting a bit better-judging from my trip last September-but not by much.

BillT-you need to head over to the St. Sulpice area, Rue Ghisarde, there is one fairly good Thai restaurant in that area, and also Vietnamese as well-many different restaurants to choose from, and a lovely location to wander around. Also, you might like Chez Leon on the St. Germain de Pres, if you like mussels and frites-they are excellent there.
Girlspytravel is offline  
Apr 6th, 2007, 01:54 PM
  #38  
 
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Actually, I should amend my last post. I go out to eat all the time at home, but I don't pay for it-and I'm almost never satisfied with the over-priced meal, except with one particular Japanese restaurant-whose owner was written up in National Geographic-(and the restaurant also happens to have a Fodors 2006 "recommended" sticker on the door, I noticed the last time I walked by there).
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Apr 6th, 2007, 02:01 PM
  #39  
 
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OK - I can't remember the last time I had fried meats, hot dogs (except at a basketball/baseball game - and I usually have polish sausage instead), jello (too 1950's to even consider), cornflakes, Tex Mex, chow mein, Rice a Roni (yuck), or carrot cake. And the last cheesecake I ate was in Paris.

And I've never, ever eaten lobster rolls, catfish, or chop suey. I manage to eat "American" food w/o almost any of the slop you mentioned.
janisj is online now  
Apr 6th, 2007, 02:08 PM
  #40  
 
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Just for the record, for those of you who love to make fun of eating an "American" breakfast in Paris -- there are a lot of people with health restrictions that prohibit a breakfast consisting of nothing but juice, coffee, bread, and more bread (particularly white bread and buttery croissants). It's fine "when in Rome, do as the Romans do", but not when it seriously affects one's health.
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