Peggy and Sandy's Spain trip

May 13th, 2011, 12:44 PM
  #21  
 
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Or just a compass! Keep it going, Peg.
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May 13th, 2011, 01:08 PM
  #22  
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Dudette: I had a compass. I got it right after my marathon of getting lost in London, Berlin, and Vienna in 2009, but I guess I just didn't use it right. Okay, in the future, the plan is to check which direction I'm going, write it down, and then follow it on the way back.

Hadn't thought of the girl scout suggestion. Hmmm....
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May 14th, 2011, 11:09 AM
  #23  
 
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In Malaga, the pasos are called Tronos (thrones) and those who carry them, Hombres de Trono. The word "costalero" refers to those that go under the paso, as in Seville, as you correctly mention.
The big thrones may be carried by over 150 people. I've done it myself. The head gear you mention is appropiately called "faraona", not all brotherhoods carry it. The gloved hand should hang limp, and we tried to keep it so, but as hours pass, you find it easier to rest it on the shoulder of the man in front.
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May 14th, 2011, 11:16 AM
  #24  
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Josele: Thank you so much for the information. I hope to return to Málaga next year for Semana Santa. It was such a wonderful experience that I would like to be there for the entire Holy Week.

I do have some questions. I read in a TripAdvisor report members of the Spanish Foreign Legion march in the procession. Does that happen every year? Also, can a tourist such as myself "rent" a seat along the parade route, specifically along the Alameda Principal?

I'd appreciate any help you can give me.
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May 14th, 2011, 02:38 PM
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Hi Pegonderoad,
The Spanish Foreign Legion march every year with the Christ of Buena Muerte (Good Death), which actually is my brotherhood. You can buy seats, but it is difficult being a hilight of the Holy Week. You'll have to buy from a reseller, I'll try to find out how's been this year.
Meanwhile, here you have a photo of the Christ, a soldier and me amongst others carrying the throne, back in 77: http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images...uerte1977.jpg/
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May 14th, 2011, 02:51 PM
  #26  
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Thanks so much! Which one is you? I assume the man in the foreground is a Legionnaire. I remember seeing the Crhist of Buena Muerte listed as one of the cofradias.

I would like to have a seat for the whole week or for much of the week, if it is possible. Do you know how much I could expect to pay for a seat?

There was a seat (or two) on sale or rent at my hotel, but since I was going to be there for only three days, I didn't buy it. After those three days, we went to Sevilla for five days--and were pretty much rained out.

I have another question. Does Málaga have the madrugá, as Sevilla does?
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May 14th, 2011, 03:06 PM
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Legionnaires carry the wooden figure of Cristo de la Buena Muerte (Christ of the Good Death) on Maundy Thursday.
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-MKj-TPGkrB...0/DSC_0654.JPG
BTW, Novio de la Muerte (Bridegroom of Death) is the official hymn and regimental slow march of the Spanish Legion.
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May 14th, 2011, 04:40 PM
  #28  
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Wow!

I've heard that the Legionnaires sing a hymn as they march. Is there a specific day when they march and sing?
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May 14th, 2011, 04:41 PM
  #29  
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Oops! I saw too late that you answered my question. Maundy Thursday. I'll be there!
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May 14th, 2011, 05:32 PM
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Hey Peg, I was a girl scout once and do have a pretty good sense of direction if you want to stuff me in a suitcase on your next trip. (Un fortunately, I snore loudly--or so they tell me--so I guess I would be pretty bad even stuffed in luggage.)
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May 14th, 2011, 08:10 PM
  #31  
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Irishface: My friend Sandy is a noisy sleeper, so I used earplugs on the trip.

Will you fit into a 22" carryon?
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May 15th, 2011, 12:01 AM
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On Thursday morning, legionnaires carry the Christ on the cross from the chapel to the processional throne. It is an impressive ceremony, and it is crowded. In the evening the procession takes place.
We've not rented chairs for some years, but I guess it must be about 100 eur the week. Another option is renting a room at an hotel on the itinerary. You can check Tripadvisor for 3-star Hotel Venecia, at Alameda Principal very near calle Larios. Only the two Front rooms face the Alameda, you have to book well in advance. Another option is RoomMate Larios, unbeatable location, more pricey.
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May 15th, 2011, 07:21 AM
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We were in Malaga a week before Semana Santa. What a lovely city! We stayed for 3 nights at Posada del Patio.
Favorites :the area near the Roman Theater , Paseo del Parque leading to Plaza de Toros, cafes and rwstaurants around Calles Larios and Granada, Picasso museum.
Great "vibe", good food, perfect weather.
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May 15th, 2011, 08:07 AM
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Peg, not a chance. Too bad.
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May 15th, 2011, 02:02 PM
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So anyway, great time in Málaga, and as I said, I plan on returning next year and staying for longer--perhaps the entire 8 days, instead of the three this year.

On Wednesday, we took the train to Sevilla, but I think I reserved the milk run--that's the one that stops at every town along the way, isn't it? It took about 2 hours to get to Sevilla, where we took a taxi to our hotel in the Triana district. The hotel, the Zenit, was pleasant enough--clean and modern--but overpriced as apparently are most of the hotels in Sevilla during Santa Semana.

But I think what I liked best about the Zenit was the "help." Probably because of Sandy's determination to tip very well, we were quite popular in the "cafeteria" and dining room. The staff were very friendly to us, including one of the men at the reception desk. He spoke quite good English, and he enjoyed teasing a little. On Thursday evening, before the all-night procession called the Madrugá, he told me that the security guard had "mental powers" and that the guard had told him it wasn't going to rain that night.

Apparently the guard's "mental powers" failed him because it did rain that night and, in fact, all but the first day. We were were able to see processions only on the first day, and our viewing spot wasn't ideal, since it was right next to two large trash cans--the really big ones that we used to call "Dempsey Dumpsters" in California. It was somewhat odiferous and the area was very crowded, so that we didn't have a very good view. I tried to get Sandy to move further down the street, but she didn't want to move.

Why didn't I just move and leave her to her own devices? I don't know. I guess I just expected that we'd have other chances to watch with a better view.

I wanted Sandy to see the Alcazar, since I'd liked it so much in past visits. I think I like it even better than the Alhambra, because it's more manageable. It does have some of the same beautiful plaster work and tiling that the Alhambra has, but is more compact and while it doesn't have its scale, the Alcazar is also very impressive. One of my freshest memories is when my sister and I went there in 2004, and we were resting on a bench in the garden, when a duck took a dislike to Mary's pantleg and kept pecking at her pants. We took a picture of this aggressive fowl and still chuckle when we look at it. What do you suppose was in that duck's mind?

However, since it was raining, we didn't go into the garden this time. We planned to see flamenco that evening, so we wanted to catch a cab back to the hotel. We set off in search of an empty cab and had to walk long enough that Sandy was getting a bit testy, but we did finally find one. We went to the flamenco show, which I could have skipped, having seen flamenco before. Since Sandy wanted to see it, I went along with the plan, and it turned out that I quite enjoyed it. I thought the dancers looked like they were enjoying themselves, especially at the "dance-off" at the end of the show where they seemed to be competing about who could dance fastest and most passionately.

The next day we visited the cathedral, which is HUGE and quite impressive. We walked along a pedestrian street to the cathedral and really enjoyed the scene. One of the fun things were the human statues, one without a head and another a great imitation of Johnny Depp in "Pirates of the Caribbean." I put a coin in the box at his feet, and he reached out to shake my hand, but once he got my hand, he wouldn't let go. He also did something funny with his eyes--made them really glassy and crazy. I of course knew that he wanted another coin, and with much laughter, I gave him another coin--whereupon he reached his hand out as if to shake my hand again. Oh, no! I didn't just fall off the turnip truck, so I just watched other people do the same thing as I had. He was really fun.
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May 16th, 2011, 01:56 PM
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The plaster and tilework at the Alcazar were made by artisans and craftmen brought from Granada. Though a palace built by christian king Pedro I, it was done in the fashion of the best architecture available then, the moorish.
The cathedral is in fact the second or third in size in Christiandom (there are disagreements in size, depending on the grounds considered)..
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May 16th, 2011, 11:51 PM
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<< The next day we visited the cathedral, which is HUGE and quite impressive >>
It's said that a member of the chapter, in the planning stages, to have commented, "we shall have a church of such a kind that those who see it built will think we were mad".
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May 17th, 2011, 08:50 PM
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Hi Peg,
I'm really enjoying your ramble through some of my favourite spots. Was in Granada last year for Semana Santa and I loved the processions.
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May 18th, 2011, 06:08 PM
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Hi Peg, I love your trip report. Please do continue so we can all benefit from it in planning our own Semana Santa visit to Spain in the future. We do have a similar Holy Week celebration in the Philippines which used to be a Spanish colony. My husband's family has a San Pedro Statue mounted on a silver-lined carroza which leads the Good Friday and Easter Sunday processions in their old town. So I could quite imagine how beautiful it must be to celebrate Semana Santa in Spain! In your opinion, which part of Spain is it best ?
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May 18th, 2011, 07:20 PM
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Peg - please do continue. This is full of very good info and it is fun!

I'm bookmarking to read later when I can take notes!
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