Paris - How much is this going to cost?

Old Nov 20th, 1998, 12:36 PM
  #1  
Fran Smith
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Paris - How much is this going to cost?

We will be in Paris for 10 days during April, 1999 for our honeymoon. We know how much the plane tickets and hotel will cost, but we don't know how much to plan for food, museum tickets, etc.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 
Old Nov 20th, 1998, 02:56 PM
  #2  
jeanne
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Fran-weren't you the one asking about whether to go in April or not-looks as if it is on for then!

Cost in Paris is kind of a "fluid" thing-a lot depends on what you like to do, whether you wil walk, take a taxi or the metro and also whether you are a shopper or really want to eat and drink (wine or other) well. Also, how much "sticker shock" in terms of prices will also depend on what you are used to-if you are from New York-it is pretty comparable-if you are from Oklahoma, it will probably seem really high. If you can give me an idea of the sorts of things that you want to do in Paris, how (gourmet or simple) you ant to eat, etc. I can at least give you some ranges-other folks will be able to help too.

Generally, a cab from one major part of Paris to another (within the peripherique boundaries) will probably cost you between 50-200 francs, ($10-40) but that covers a lot of area...

When my husband and I eat in a bistro at lunch, we probably spend 180 francs or so ($36 for two). This would be a fixed menu, a small carafe of wine-a glass or two each. I think food prices compare to New York or LA. Of course, if you splurge on a great meal (and you should!, you could easily spend $200-300 for 2-but I expect the same is true of big cities here.

The museum and metro all have "deals" on tickets-but I don't have info on these at hand (the 7 day visit Paris pass, etc)but I am sure others know the cost or you should be able to find that stuff on Paris.org site.

Anyway, I hope this helps! I hope you have a lovely honeymoon-have you decided which hotel you will stay at yet? There are so many lovely ones in Paris.
 
Old Nov 20th, 1998, 07:53 PM
  #3  
Seamus
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Fran, you are making a wonderful choice in opting for Paris for your honeymoon! As to cost, as Jeanne stated you can go from basic to an all-out blowout as the mood suits. Here's the strategy that has worked well for me on many Paris visits:
1. Most hotels serve breakfast. This can range from the stereotypical coffee and croissant to a full buffet. Eat up, even if you're not usually a breakfast person. This will stoke the furnace for a full day.
2. After a substantial breakfast you'll probably not want a big lunch. Go for a sandwich, salad or even a crepe.
3. Do stop for a coffe/tea, with a light snack (e.g., pastry!) in the afternoon
4. Combine dinner and a leisurely stroll. The Latin Quarter abounds with places that offer fixed price menus that are in no danger of garnering 5 stars but are perfectly fine. Pick up a copy of a Rough Guide for listings of restaurants in all price ranges.
5. Since this is your honeymoon, choose at least one night to really do it up! Avoid the tourist traps, and choose a truly fine place to create memories.
Enjoy - and congratulations!
 
Old Nov 20th, 1998, 07:56 PM
  #4  
Seamus
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Fran, you are making a wonderful choice in opting for Paris for your honeymoon! As to cost, as Jeanne stated you can go from basic to an all-out blowout as the mood suits. Food costs can range from $20/day/person and up, depending on how you eat. Here's the strategy that has worked well for me on many Paris visits:
1. Most hotels serve breakfast. This can range from the stereotypical coffee and croissant to a full buffet. Eat up, even if you're not usually a breakfast person. This will stoke the furnace for a full day.
2. After a substantial breakfast you'll probably not want a big lunch. Go for a sandwich, salad or even a crepe.
3. Do stop for a coffe/tea, with a light snack (e.g., pastry!) in the afternoon
4. Combine dinner and a leisurely stroll. The Latin Quarter abounds with places that offer fixed price menus that are in no danger of garnering 5 stars but are perfectly fine. Pick up a copy of a Rough Guide for listings of restaurants in all price ranges.
5. Since this is your honeymoon, choose at least one night to really do it up! Avoid the tourist traps, and choose a truly fine place to create memories.
Enjoy - and congratulations!
 
Old Nov 22nd, 1998, 02:02 PM
  #5  
Diane
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We celebrated my birthday last May in Paris. It was terrific. The BEST deal is the Museum ticket you can buy at any Museum, or even in a Metro station. You should get two 5-day passes -- this includes admission to many of the "sights" as well as museums. It is for 5 consecutive days -- and be sure to check which day a week each museum you want to visit is closed (usually Mon or Tue). But the best thing is you won't have to wait in long lines to get in. It is almost worth the cost to know you can walk right in to the Louvre (and not stand in line for 2 hours) and see a couple of the must-sees, and leave and come back another day to see something in one of the other wings. No pressure to rush from Mona Lisa to Venus de Milo, etc. You will actually enjoy it, and have time to lounge around the boat pond in the Tuilleries gardens. I echo the tip about breakfast. There are neat little bakeries you can buy a Croque Monsier(?) sort of a grilled cheese sandwich but French, or quiche for picnic lunches. Do the touristy things like go to the top of the Eiffer Tower, and the boat ride down the Seine and back (check for coupons at your hotel). Take the Metro, and learn the bus system too (its easy, maps are everywhere). Stop at cafes and have coffee or "deux bieres" (I collected coasters as souvieners!)and people watch. Go to an American movie with French subtitles for a fun experience.
Do a day trip to Chartes or Giverney.
Take a walk along Canal St. Martin to see a more residential part of Paris. Visit the Place des Voges and the Marais section, which is ancient and very different from the Left Bank or Monmartre, which you should also see!
Visit lots of web sites, hit the library for some travel books, and you'll get the feel for what parts of town may interest you the most. Plan to walk -- a lot.
 
Old Nov 23rd, 1998, 07:29 AM
  #6  
Fran Smith
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Yes Jeanne, we've decided to take our chances on April!!! We'd like to visit several museums and art galeries, but we don't want to spend all our time indoors (unless it's raining, of course). We'd also like to make a few day trips outside Paris.

We like to eat simply most of the time, but we'll probably "go for broke" for a least 1 big dinner.

Did any of you guys visit the "Pusse" (the big Flea Market), and it so, what were your experiences.

Thanks for all your help!

Fran
 
Old Nov 23rd, 1998, 07:31 AM
  #7  
Fran Smith
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Oh by the way, we'll be staying at the Grand Ecoles in the 5th arr.

If you've stayed there, what room do you suggest?
 
Old Nov 23rd, 1998, 08:42 AM
  #8  
Christina
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The "Pusse"???!!!!
I believe you are probably referring to
the "marche aux puces", perhaps you've
heard that -- "puce" is the French word
for flea. I've been there (the one at Porte Clignancourt in the north) and wasn't impressed. Would only recommend it if you really love that kind of thing. Not any real bargains, takes up a whole day -- and you have to know an awful lot about a certain subject if you intend to shop seriously for it (eg, antique jewelry or furniture) in order to evaluate the cost and quality.
I would not really call this a flea
mkt in the usual sense as I've seen in
the U.S.--it's really more like a part of town with used/antique shops. The
"flea market" part is temporary
stands selling shlock like cheap T-shirts that you can get around Notre
Dame.
 
Old Nov 23rd, 1998, 05:42 PM
  #9  
Diane
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You may find market days (you're going to have to do this in the morning) along the Boulevard (Richard Lenoir, or Voltaire)between the Bastille and Place
de Republique are as interesting as the flea markets. Plus you can then head down to the Marais --- where there are outlets for some of the clothing manufacturers, as well as many interesting little shops. A little bit of French helps, but you don't have to be fluent.
 

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