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Paris-Ben Franklin's Home

Old Jul 5th, 2006, 05:17 AM
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Paris-Ben Franklin's Home

We just read that Ben Franklin's home in London has been opened to the public and we were wondering if there was anything to visit in Paris connected to him.
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melissa
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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 06:20 AM
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Interesting question Melissa. There is a statue, in the vicinity of the Trocadero Metro station. May be more that I'm not aware of.
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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 06:32 AM
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Here's a start

This morning follow in the footsteps of the early American delegation to France. Highlights include 4, Place de la Concorde, where the Treaty of Friendship with France was signed by Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane and Arthur Lee in 1778; John Adams' residence in Auteuil; and the site of Franklin's residence in Passy where he set up a lighting rod and a printing press. We shall stop to admire his statue at the Trocadéro and drive by the site of Jefferson's residence on the Champs-Elysées. We then pass the Hôtel des Monnaies, where Jefferson's friend Condorcet lived, and the Hôtel de Salm, inspiration for the dome at Monticello. Lunch is at Le Procope, a meeting place for philosophers like Voltaire, revolutionaries like Robespierre, and our own Benjamin Franklin. We return to the hotel, with a stop at 56, rue Jacob, where Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and John Adams signed the Treaty of Paris in 1783.
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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 06:32 AM
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You might want to do some research on Hotel D'Angleterre. This is housed in the former British Embassy (hence the name). The details of the Treaty of Paris were negotiated here ~ although I have read that B. Franklin refused to enter the premises as he did not wish to walk on British soil! Be advised there are 2 hotels in Paris with the same name - this is the one on Rue Jacob in the 6th. (We stayed there for 5 nights in March 2006 and really enjoyed the hotel).

http://www.hotel-dangleterre.com/hot...eterre_en.html
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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 06:35 AM
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and even more

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...gewanted=print


had begun my look around the district near the westernmost end of Auteuil. So the next day I began my pilgrimage at its easternmost limit, in Passy. Pilgrimage is the mot juste: for Americans Passy should be sacred ground. No American was ever more adored by the French than Benjamin Franklin, who has been called ''the sage of Philadelphia and Passy.'' He lived in Passy for eight and a half years from 1777 to 1785, charming the French into financing our often shaky Revolutionary War -- first secretly, then as official allies.

Franklin, then in his 70's, managed this while being first among equals with all the French ''philosophes''; trying out American inventions like cornbread on the French, and jouncing in his carriage out to Versailles once a week (along the road now called the Avenue de Versailles) to carry on complex negotiations with the French Foreign Minister.

Most of that time Franklin was in pain with gout and bladder stones, but he entertained and was entertained constantly, and shocked John Adams by his enjoyment of the permissive Paris society. ''I believe that there is no man of your age in Europe so much a favorite with the ladies,'' the austere John Jay wrote Franklin. And Jefferson said, ''When he left Passy it seemed as if the village had lost its patriarch.''

I said au revoir to the lovely statue of Franklin in a hilly little garden plot near the Place du Trocadero called le Square de Yorktown. Franklin, in rumpled clothes, is seated, smiling with interest as he seems to be listening to someone speaking. People said he was a wonderful listener. His statue is at the beginning of a street called Rue Franklin. I took this downhill till it became Rue Raynouard where, high up on an un inspiring apartment house, there is a plaque in French commemorating the lightning conductor experiments Franklin made on the site. His borrowed home, part of the grand Hotel de Valentinois, occupied the space now covered by Nos. 64 to 72.

A house in a shady garden a few doors down, where Balzac lived for six and a half years, hiding much of the time from his creditors (he used to escape them through the back entrance), gives a feeling of what leafy, l9th-century Passy was like. It is now a museum. Although Balzac was nearly always in debt, I was surprised by some rather grand personal items on display. But nothing much is left in Passy that Franklin could have set eyes on except, almost directly downhill below him, portions of the Hotel de Lamballe, now part of the Turkish Embassy and surrounded with security guards.

The Rue de Passy, just above Franklin's house, is still the main shopping street; it was the principal village street in Franklin's day. And Franklin knew well the Grande Rue, or main street, of Auteuil, now the Rue d'Auteuil. He used to go there at least once a week to see his dearly beloved Madame Helvetius, a blowsy intellectual who was always surrounded with the best ''philosophes,'' and who shocked Abigail Adams by wiping up her lap dog's mess with her chemise. Her house and garden were behind what is now No. 59.

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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 07:45 AM
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Something interesting to add about 56 Rue Jacob, the sight where the Treaty of Paris was negotiated. The marker for this event, one of the most historically important in the history of both the U.S. and Great Britain, is written only in French! If you don't know the language, you'd have no idea that so major a treaty was done here.
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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 08:06 AM
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If you want to visit the Adams residence in Auteuil, go on a Wednesday or Saturday morning so you can combine the visit with a stroll through an excellent street market on the square by it. And also toss into the visit an opportunity to check out some of the buildings designed by the famous Hector Guimard.
Among them, the Hôtel Guimard is located at 122, avenue Mozart. Designed by Hector Guimard between 1909 and 1912 for himself with an atelier for his wife, Adeline, a painter. And the Castel Beranger, considered by some to be Guimard's masterpiece, is located in the same neighborhood at 14, rue la Fontaine (in 1899, the building was determined to have the nicest facade in Paris).

http://www.amb-usa.fr/resources/fran...lestones16.htm
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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 02:54 PM
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Is this a tour?
Melissa


This morning follow in the footsteps of the early American delegation to France. Highlights include 4, Place de la Concorde, where the Treaty of Friendship with France was signed by Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane and Arthur Lee in 1778; John Adams' residence in Auteuil; and the site of Franklin's residence in Passy where he set up a lighting rod and a printing press. We shall stop to admire his statue at the Trocadéro and drive by the site of Jefferson's residence on the Champs-Elysées. We then pass the Hôtel des Monnaies, where Jefferson's friend Condorcet lived, and the Hôtel de Salm, inspiration for the dome at Monticello. Lunch is at Le Procope, a meeting place for philosophers like Voltaire, revolutionaries like Robespierre, and our own Benjamin Franklin. We return to the hotel, with a stop at 56, rue Jacob, where Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and John Adams signed the Treaty of Paris in 1783.

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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 05:06 PM
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There are several walking tours near/past areas where Americans of some fame lived in Paris. They are outlined in the book "Americans in Paris" by Brian Morton.

See this link:
http://www.oliviahill.com/html/paris.html

BC
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Old Jul 5th, 2006, 06:54 PM
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