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Paris authorities raid suspected illegal vacation rentals in 1er & 6er

Paris authorities raid suspected illegal vacation rentals in 1er & 6er

Jan 17th, 2016, 04:39 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
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Not cooperating with the law is an interesting concept.

Vu sous cet angle on peut aussi considérer qu'on s'en tape de ce qui peut arriver au touriste.

Dans ce cas je ne vois pas pourquoi on devrait aussi les conseiller dans ce qu'ils doivent voir.

Perso je pense qu'il y a des lois dans les pays qu'on visite et que c'est bien de les connaître. Et de les prévenir qu'ils peuvent se retrouver à la rue sans logement.

Quant à s'en balancer des aspects moraux ça le fait marrer de lire le touriste de base dire : je paie donc je m'en fiche. Il paie il ne respecte pas la loi il se débrouille.

Le vrai parisien est celui qui est né à Paris?
Whathello is offline  
Jan 17th, 2016, 08:14 AM
  #22  
 
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It's not unbelievable that a tourist unaware of these issues might not realise the government officials are legit, and hence deny access. I'm not sure I'd be comfortable in such a situation myself.
Nonconformist is offline  
Jan 17th, 2016, 08:32 AM
  #23  
 
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He was himself a cop, so he must have realized he would be laughing stock with his colleagues.

My experience is that an off-duty policeman may not act in any official capacity. One chased away vandals as the resident of a property in the countryside, after they had smashed some windows of "la maison des américains" (mine) but could not arrest them.
Michael is offline  
Jan 17th, 2016, 11:24 AM
  #24  
 
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Just for the record, in serious cases the authorities can come to an apartment accompanied by a bailiff (huissier and a locksmith if there is a refusal to open the door. And then they will proceed to open the door whether there is anyone inside the apartment or not.
kerouac is online now  
Jan 17th, 2016, 11:57 AM
  #25  
 
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A true Parisian is only one born in Paris? Really?
jubilada is offline  
Jan 17th, 2016, 12:47 PM
  #26  
 
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Mustn't be a lot left.. now that most apartments have been bought in order to rent them illegally, no 'true' Parisian can live in Paris anymore !

the loop is closing
Whathello is offline  
Jan 21st, 2016, 05:42 AM
  #27  
 
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According to the Mayor's task force, balanced against the latest population census, there are more vacation rental apartments - specifically used for short-term rental income - than there are actual residents (either long-term renters or resident property owners) living in apartments in the Marais.

At the last count made by the Mayor's task force, there are approximately 280,000 vacation rentals which are being used solely for short-term rental income in Paris.

That means that a whole lot of "true Parisians" - your friendly waiter, that nice saleslady, etc - have to live elsewhere (most often in the suburbs), because those 280,000 apartments are not available for long-term rent.

Why should "true Parisians" have to suffer through an hour's transit each way to get to and from work, just for the privilege of selling a morning croissant to a tourist who is staying across the street from where the "true Parisian" works?

I don't think this picture can be any clearer...
fuzzbucket is offline  
Jan 21st, 2016, 06:05 AM
  #28  
 
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When my office in central Paris had 35 people in it, only 3 of us managed to live in Paris. (Okay, half of them really wanted to live in the suburbs, but the other half spent lots of time complaining about having to commute because they couldn't afford to live in Paris.)
kerouac is online now  
Jan 21st, 2016, 07:21 AM
  #29  
twk
 
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The prohibition on short term rentals in Paris seems to be working about as well as the prohibition on alcohol worked in the United States in the early part of the 20th century. It's up to the French to decide what to do, but we're all entitled to have an opinion on the subject, and I personally think that its a bad idea. A tax on short term rentals would be more likely to be honored, and would provide an effective disincentive for short term rentals as opposed to long term rental. An outright prohibition is just driving this business off the books.

If you want cheaper housing, the only way to get it is to have more of it, but that's not really possible in central Paris--there will always be a shortage. Trying to game the market so that locals get a break is going to be difficult.

I did a one week rental in Paris back in 2004, and would like to do one again, but this issue is just enough of a negative that I probably won't be coming back to Paris for an extended stay anytime soon--at least not until I cross some other spots off my list. If I had to go to Paris for a week, I'd probably still look into a rental, but do that knowing it could fall through and I might have to find other options. If you're on a really tight budget, that's not a contingency you would want to deal with, but if you're opting for an apartment for other reasons, it probably wouldn't dissuade you from running the risk of a last minute change.
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Jan 21st, 2016, 08:04 AM
  #30  
 
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The same thing is happening in New York, San Francisco, and elsewhere. It's not a uniquely French issue, nor is it a problem outside of Paris as far as I know.
StCirq is online now  
Feb 3rd, 2016, 06:24 PM
  #31  
 
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Are you still posting? I saw that you were leaving forum? I am first time traveler and too many conflicting stories on here. Would you allow me to talk with you off here? Email?
ginanoelle10 is offline  
Feb 4th, 2016, 07:31 AM
  #32  
 
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No, I never left the forum. I was absent a lot in the months we were getting ready to move to France because I was busy, is all.

Yes, you can email me at my screen name at aol dot com
StCirq is online now  
Feb 5th, 2016, 02:49 PM
  #33  
 
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Some people are not allowed to leave. The forum would seem empty if they did.
Whathello is offline  
Feb 6th, 2016, 01:55 AM
  #34  
 
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These signs have been cropping up in the Marais - both inside the entrance hall of the buildings and some are even posted outside. There's one 3 doors down from my building.
Proof that residents are taking action while the government has to wade through all that paperwork (Google Translate works OK):
http://vivrelemarais.typepad.fr/blog...9agissent.html
fuzzbucket is offline  
Feb 6th, 2016, 03:35 AM
  #35  
 
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Good for them.
kerouac is online now  
Feb 6th, 2016, 10:23 AM
  #36  
 
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I love it.
StCirq is online now  
Feb 6th, 2016, 10:50 AM
  #37  
Original Poster
 
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I thought the comments section was the most interesting part of that blog article. I imagine some people will not be able to get past an ad hominem argument against people posting in the comments section, but if posters on Fodor's are asking people to observe the letter of the law regarding short-term rentals in Paris, then what needs to be read is the law, not signs.
sandralist is offline  
Feb 6th, 2016, 11:00 AM
  #38  
 
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Posters on Fodors are very unlikely to know where to go to, or how to, read the law. At least the signs give them a clue as to what some local Parisiens feel about the short-term rentals issue.
StCirq is online now  
Feb 6th, 2016, 11:15 AM
  #39  
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What local Parisians think about short-term rentals is not the issue. Listen up sometime to what local Venetians think about the proliferation of hotels in Venice. Are you going now start badgering people on Fodor's about booking a hotel in Venice?

There are legal short-term apartment rentals in Paris. If Parisians want to outlaw all short-term rentals they can, but they haven't. It is misleading to suggest all short-term lets are illegal or immoral or being rude to Parisians.

It is more complicated to find a legal short-term rental in Paris, but I would have thought the point of a travel message forum was for people who do understand complicated issues in a travel destination to inform those who are new to the destination. How disappointing to find out so many people regularly posting are really just interested in swanning around and looking for validation of something == or whatever it is they are here for. Who knows, really.
sandralist is offline  
Feb 6th, 2016, 11:34 AM
  #40  
 
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What exactly is your point, sandralist? Do you want people to rent illegal apartments? Do you want forum members to stop warning them? I know that quite a few forum members own rental properties in Paris and have their own agenda about this subject.

As for the sad case of Venice, I will leave that to the specialists on the Italy forum. But I still find it somewhat upsetting that the population of Venice has declined from 174,000 in 1951 to the current total of less than 60,000.

The center of Paris has suffered a similar fate. The population of the 6th arrondissement, so beloved by many North American tourists, has dropped from 90,000 to 20,000. And as for the administrative district of Saint Germain des Prés (24th administrative district of Paris), the population is 5,154. I guess that's why tourists feel so comfortable there -- there are almost no Parisians left there.
kerouac is online now  

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