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Original form of ID, or copies on phone for entry to museums/sites?

Original form of ID, or copies on phone for entry to museums/sites?

Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 07:58 AM
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Original form of ID, or copies on phone for entry to museums/sites?

To those of you that have teens that may look older, what was your experience regarding proof of age at the various museums and sites? I know that different sites may have different rules, but in general did you find that a photocopy on a phone was sufficient proof or do they normally require the hard/original copy of the ID? Thanks.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Danielcjr
To those of you that have teens that may look older, what was your experience regarding proof of age at the various museums and sites? I know that different sites may have different rules, but in general did you find that a photocopy on a phone was sufficient proof or do they normally require the hard/original copy of the ID? Thanks.
Why would you need a proof of age to visit a museum? I guess some countries charge for access. But if you are say, visiting Europe, you have to have your passport on you so why not show that.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 08:04 AM
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Where are you asking about??

If London (based upon your other thread about the Tube) - I think most of the sites state something like "ID may be required" . Most will take one's word for it but just in case, a copy of the passport in the phone would be more than adequate . . .
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 08:06 AM
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Was posting the same time a bilboburgler -- the OP states museums and SITES. Sitels like the Tower charge significantly more or less depending on age.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 09:04 AM
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It depends on where you are visiting, but since most of Europe requires people to carry some form of original ID with them at all times it shouldn't be a problem for you. Yes that means your passport as your driving licence almost certainly won't be accepted unless it is an EU licence.

Many places have no discounts for seniors. Some do and may ask for proof.
The one museum we visited in France with a senior discount gave it to DH without question but I had to show my Dutch driving licence to get mine. I admit I was quite flattered! Nowhere else we visited offered a discount. Pretty sure none of the Dutch museums offer one either.

If you are buying timed entry tickets with a name on them then yes they may ask for ID, and will expect the orginal. Anyone can stick an fake ID on their phone after all.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 09:15 AM
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Perhaps the OP can clarify. I interpreted their question to mean purchasing tickets for a teenager where the price may be reduced for younger than 18 and their teens either appear or are older than that.

When I was 13, my mom once insisted I was 12 on an admission somewhere once (not un Europe); and the price was significantly higher for 13 and up, for example. Maybe something like that is what the OP is referring to?
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by janisj
the OP states museums and SITES. Sites like the Tower charge significantly more or less depending on age.
Bingo. Several sites/tours in both the UK and Italy (where we will be coming from) charge less for 16 or 17 and under versus 18 and above.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Travel_Nerd
Perhaps the OP can clarify. I interpreted their question to mean purchasing tickets for a teenager where the price may be reduced for younger than 18 and their teens either appear or are older than that.
You understood correctly.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 10:56 AM
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Then you will absolutely need proof of age. You cannot expect someone to tell a sixteen or seventeen year old from an eighteen year old. And it will need to be original. As I said anyone can have a fake ID on their phone, and the law says you must be able to identify yourself.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 11:30 AM
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No one in the UK is required to carry an ID. A copy of the passport or driver's license would be more that adequate to prove age for the OP's purposes. We are talking about the ticket kiosk at the Tower of London or Westminster Abbey. They would be more than happy to accept any form of ID.

Same for senior discounts (though IME they will not question you one way or the other)
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 12:34 PM
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Originally Posted by janisj
We are talking about the ticket kiosk at the Tower of London or Westminster Abbey. They would be more than happy to accept any form of ID.
I think you're right, but maybe we'll take originals with us the first couple of days out as a backup just in case and see what happens. Thanks.
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Old Jun 2nd, 2024, 12:44 PM
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I apologise. SInce OP did not tag this as United Kingdom it was not clear which country they were planning to visit.
As I said in my first post most countries in Europe require you to carry some form of approved ID, which for a non European would be their passport.
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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 01:52 AM
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In the past, I've sometimes had to leave behind some sort of official document when getting an audio guide, to make sure you returned it. In this case, a copy (physical or digital) wouldn't work. I don't know if this is ever done any more.
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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 02:17 AM
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Yes it is - we had to do the same at a museum in France, DH left his driving licence with them and was given a number to reclaim it at the end of our visit.
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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 03:36 AM
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Originally Posted by hetismij2
Yes it is - we had to do the same at a museum in France, DH left his driving license with them and was given a number to reclaim it at the end of our visit.
Just when you think you've thought of everything. Good point.
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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 07:38 AM
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In the UK (scores of visits) I've only had that done once in the last 10-15 years -- at the V&A for the blockbuster Dior exhibition. For the even bigger Chanel last winter they didn't so they may have decided the small amount of 'walk away' audio guides is less hassle than the efforts needed to collect/protect/return IDs.

Earlier (like the last century) it did happen occasionally - mostly in smaller provincial museums.

Unless you have money belts or other very secure places to carry your passports -- I wouldn't personally be carrying four passports - lose one and you will have to deal with a HUGE mess.

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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 07:44 AM
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Also keep in mind that in some countries (such as Italy) you are required to carry official ID on your person at all times. In train stations, and other places, there are random document checks. Realistically, and I hate to admit this, it's unlikely to happen if you are a "respectable"-looking White person.

When I moved to Italy, I carried my passport at all times for five years, when I got an Italian identity card. I'm a respectable looking White person, but I refuse to accept favourable treatment on that account.
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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by janisj
Unless you have money belts or other very secure places to carry your passports -- I wouldn't personally be carrying four passports - lose one and you will have to deal with a HUGE mess.
I'm with you 100%. My wife carries a cross body that's secured with a carabiner clip (and her NYC radar is impeccable), so I don't think we'd be too vulnerable, but I still don't like the idea of having the passports on us.
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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by bvlenci
Also keep in mind that in some countries (such as Italy) you are required to carry official ID on your person at all times. In train stations, and other places, there are random document checks. Realistically, and I hate to admit this, it's unlikely to happen if you are a "respectable"-looking White person.
Not that I'm looking to tempt fate, but I wonder what the authorities do to you if you don't have your passport on you. Seems unlikely that they would cart you off to jail, but maybe a big fine? I know they love their fines in Europe.
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Old Jun 3rd, 2024, 09:22 AM
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A bit off topic but...

Aside from the law in some countries requiring non-citizens/non-residents to carry an official government-issued ID of some sort at all times, there are the "what if" situations, like if there is an incident or accident in which you need to prove your identity. Looking from the viewpoint of the officials in a country, they don't know you from Adam. They can't know if you're legally in the country or anything else about you if you can't identity yourself with proper documentation. For tourists, that's usually a passport.
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