Name Your Favorite Breakfast Abroad!

Apr 21st, 2006, 03:31 PM
  #21  
 
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What's the english word for "pain perdu"? In German it's "Arme Ritter" (poor knights). No idea where the expression comes from.
logos999 is offline  
Apr 21st, 2006, 03:33 PM
  #22  
 
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We just returned from Scotland and our Hotel served the most extraordinary smoked salmon with an amazing cheese and some crusty/soft bread!!!

The fruit was exotic and perfect....I of course, love the tea there...

Not all of us Yanks like syrup poured over bacon, etc...
although my neice pours it on ham and peas!!1 Yuk..
annesherrod is offline  
Apr 21st, 2006, 03:35 PM
  #23  
KT
 
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"What's the english word for "pain perdu"? "

French toast.
KT is offline  
Apr 21st, 2006, 03:41 PM
  #24  
 
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Favorite? pain avec beurre et un espresso sitting at a small cafe in Paris... and sitting ... and sitting
robjame is offline  
Apr 21st, 2006, 03:51 PM
  #25  
 
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brioche con gelato e panna...ice cream in a sweet bun topped with whipped cream. The favored fast breakfast food in Palermo.
sicula is offline  
Apr 21st, 2006, 03:59 PM
  #26  
 
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The most memorable breakfast was at the Art Otel in Budapest. It sounds naive, I'm sure, but it hadn't occurred to me that people eat fish for breakfast. It wasn't the only thing offered but it was good and it makes sense to eat it in the a.m. I've never recreated it because it was wonderful and I've never wanted to tamper with the memory. If that makes any sense.
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Apr 21st, 2006, 04:18 PM
  #27  
 
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I'm with Gardyloo on breakfast in Israel. Lots of wonderful fresh fruit, including the best grapefruit juice I've ever had.
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Apr 21st, 2006, 04:27 PM
  #28  
 
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Italian almond croissants (don;t know what they call them in Italy) the best cappuchino in the world and fresh blood orange juice at the Continetale in Florence. FREE!

(And I still don;t get english breakfasts - esp that silver toast chiller thing. Toast is supposed to be soft, warm and buttery - not cold and stiff.)
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Apr 21st, 2006, 04:30 PM
  #29  
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I still have not had the pleasure of trying blood orange juice. Do you know what season it is best in?
ilovetotravel29 is offline  
Apr 21st, 2006, 04:34 PM
  #30  
 
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Churros in Spain
cruiseluv is offline  
Apr 21st, 2006, 04:36 PM
  #31  
 
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Isn't it a standard variety of Florida orange juice? Spanish blood oranges are very common.
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Apr 21st, 2006, 04:47 PM
  #32  
KT
 
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Florida orange juice is usually temple oranges or some other non-red variety.

Sicilian blood oranges (most commonly, tarocco, moro, and another variety whose name escapes me at the moment) are in season roughly from mid-winter through early spring, more or less January through mid-May. I don't know where the Italians get them from the rest of the year.

I have had US-grown blood oranges, but they weren't very good. Maybe there are good ones out there, but not where I normally shop, alas.
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Apr 21st, 2006, 04:48 PM
  #33  
Neopolitan
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Wow, I never knew anyone poured syrup over bacon. Is that supposed to be for real?

And how can anyone from the UK, the land of the overcooked meats talk about overcooked bacon? Sure some like it cooked hard and crisp, I don't, but just try to get really rare beef in London even today without giving very special orders.
 
Apr 21st, 2006, 04:51 PM
  #34  
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I am going to stand up for all those that may pour syrup on their bacon.

Ahem.....

I have done the above said act....but ONLY when having pancakes or frenchtoast or waffles...I think it is one of those things where the saltiness of the crisp bacon works well with the sweetness of the syrup. I don't drench my meat in syrup, but a little drizzle can be quite nice!
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Apr 21st, 2006, 05:03 PM
  #35  
 
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Though my favorite thing in the world is fresh pineapple and I eat it at every possible moment (especially breakfast), my favorite breakfast in the world is at a place called café Paseo in Málaga. I have a "cortao doble con leche templá y tostás" (double latté and toast). If I am in an indulgent mood, I put sobrassada on the toast (sort of like spreadable chorizo sausage), but usually it is olive oil and salt. I like to put the oil onto one toast (which is half of a mini-baguette) , then fold it in half and squeeze the overrun onto the other piece of toast. It is just such a happy time of the day!
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Apr 21st, 2006, 05:07 PM
  #36  
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I did try some good corn meal porridge...I forgot what it was called...but it was delicious---I got it at a nice West Indian restaurant and it was sweetened and had a wonderful cinnamon and nutmeg flavor. Yum!
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Apr 21st, 2006, 05:33 PM
  #37  
 
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ilovetotravel- in Syria that is called Mamounie (favorite of Mamouni). You make it using semolina. In a small pot, bring two cups of water to a boil. In a pan, put 1 tbsp of butter or oil and when it is melted, add a cup of semolina. Stir it around until it is just slightly browned, then slowly pour the boiling water into the semolina, stirring all the while (a wire whisk works best). If it is too thick, add a little more water (cool is fine) and if it is not thick enough, well, then you are screwed. Put into bowl and add cinamon and nutmeg. In Syria you use flat bread with salty string cheese to scoop it up and eat it. It is amazing!
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Apr 21st, 2006, 05:43 PM
  #38  
 
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I love Scandinavian breakfasts -- many varieties of herring, cheeses, healthy crackers and so much more.
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Apr 21st, 2006, 06:19 PM
  #39  
 
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The breakfast in Japanese onsens (hot spring spa resorts): dozen little dishes plus fresh grilled fish and rice. After each trip to Japan, usually it takes me couple weeks to get back western style breakfast again.
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Apr 21st, 2006, 06:32 PM
  #40  
 
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I second the Japanese onsens, and also love a good thousand year old egg porridge with the salty egg yolks. Mmm...

In Europe, I think I just have my usual cheese and croissant. Very boring, but very yummy in my book!

And in Italy, I must have my sparkling water mixed with blood orange juice. Ooo...I think I just need a trip to Italy (don't care where) once a year from now on.
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