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My son asked this morning, "what is consumed the most in Ireland, Budweiser or Guinness?"

My son asked this morning, "what is consumed the most in Ireland, Budweiser or Guinness?"

Old Mar 18th, 2007, 11:39 AM
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My son asked this morning, "what is consumed the most in Ireland, Budweiser or Guinness?"

He asked this of a woman who doesn't drink beer. Now he has me wondering.

Thanks for any input., Joan
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 11:43 AM
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I doubt that Bud is even considered beer in Ireland, more like horsepiss.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 11:43 AM
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Guinness. I doubt if many people in Ireland drink Budweiser; it is an American beer.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 12:11 PM
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I am told by our Irish cousins that the #1 beer, in terms of sales in Ireland, is Budweiser.

Having said that, it is best to realize that THAT Bud is bottled and brewed in Ireland and the only resembelance to US Bud is the name.

Bob
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 12:13 PM
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Guinness is not technically beer in the American sense. It is a stout. Heineken is the most consumed lager (beer) in Ireland, holding 30% of the market.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 12:15 PM
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The biggest selling imported lager in Ireland is Corona Extra.

Go figure.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 12:15 PM
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you maybe surprised but in Southerin Ireland it's Murphy's that is drunk a lot it is brewed in cork. They also drink a lot of Cider Bulmers which is also brewed in Ireland. For you info Budweiser can be found in lots of pubs and clubs in the UK.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 12:55 PM
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Thanks for all of the replies. If I drank beer, I believe while in Ireland I'd order Guiness.
Crazychick, now you mentioned my drink, cidar.
Kind Regards to All, Joan
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 01:02 PM
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Forgot to mention to Brotherleelove, 1957 I got so sick on retsina I still can't smell it without feeling queasy. I most have liked to begin with. Regards, Joan
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 01:04 PM
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Correction: Must have liked it to begin with.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 01:11 PM
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Joan, I never could stomach Retsina, it tastes too much like turpentine.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 01:20 PM
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Budweiser trivia department:
I saw a girl drinking a bottle of Bud at a Paris cafe last year and asked to see the bottle. It was brewed in London, 33 cl (11 oz), and cost €5.60.

Local beers were going for less than €4. Stella Artois was going for €2 for 25 cl at the Café Leffe bar, cheapest I could find on Blvd. Saint Germain.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 01:56 PM
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most irish people i know (from ireland) don't touch guinness...and seem to want to make a point of this for some reason. however, it seems more popular amongst the disconnected irish populations around the world.

bud IS a trendy beer in europe as much as many people don't want to believe it.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 02:42 PM
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Hard to believe that anyone would drink an American beer in Europe. The Germans, in regard to our weak beer and weak coffee, claim that we just have one drink in America. If we drink it hot, we call it coffee;if we drink it cold, we call it beer.

I was at a summer school in Portland where one of the teachers, who was from Germany, would bring instant coffee to the cafeteria to add to the morning coffee she got out of the urn.

I seem to have gotten off the subject...
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 02:42 PM
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Guinness sells at least 10 times as much - by volume or in Euros - as Budweiser. Other stouts' sales (like Murphy's or Beamish) are minuscule copared to Guinness

Italian Chauffeur's cousins are simply talking claptrap: they may drink more of Anheuser-Busch's parody of beer than they do of Guinness, and their friends may have equally grisly taste. But they're unrepresentative of the rest of Ireland in their behaviour - and in their inability to understand the difference between what they do and what the rest of the island do.

The Irish regard Guinness as a beer. They regard lagers as beers too, and some of them call Budweiser a lager. The rest describe it accurately, and therefore unprintably.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 02:49 PM
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walkinround seems to share Italian Chauffeur's cousins' inability to understand that the world consists of more than just the people you know.

Guinness accounts for 35% of all the beer sold in the Republic of Ireland, and no brand of stout, ale or lager comes within spitting distance of this. The rest is mostly lagers, much of it the British Isles-conceived muck young Irishpeople have been pouring down themselves since some bright spark at Guinness invented Harp Lager at Ireland's greatest contribution to lowering standards since Val Doonican got on the boat.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 03:27 PM
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The question of Budweiser is actually pretty complicated. Both the US company Anheuser- Busch and the Czech company Budejovicky Budvar have used and claimed the name Budweiser. There have been lawsuits all over the world for the use of the name. The UK allows both to market under the Bud name although under the name Budweiser on the Czech beer label will be the name Budvar. In the republic of Ireland, you are most likely to see the A-B Bud. These companies have no connection. The Czech Bud is one of that country's quality lagers. The A-B Bud in the UK is brewed in the UK through A-B International. I have never tried it so can't say if it tastes anything like the Bud in the US that brotherleelove so aptly describes.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 04:06 PM
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>>>>
Guinness accounts for 35% of all the beer sold in the Republic of Ireland, and no brand of stout, ale or lager comes within spitting distance of this.
>>>>>

most of which is consumed by irish-americans visiting ireland to get in touch with their roots....and the rest of it is given away on the factory tour...99% of these pints have less than one sip taken before they are thrown away by the bar staff.

obviously guinness is still drunk by irishmen. however, sales have been way down in ireland...they remain strong in north america. guinness, like english cask ales is seen as your father's drink. the last thing that young irish upwardly mobiles would drink is guinness, which represents the old ireland that many despise. and the young irish underachievers drink guinness about as much as british underachievers drink cask ale. wine, lager and alcopops are growing in popularity in ireland as they are elsewhere. young people just don't drink it and older people are switching to wine and other drinks.

guinness's future fortunes lie overseas...at least until retro-irish comes into fashion in ireland....if it ever does.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 04:12 PM
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....and people in ireland are not going to the pub as much anymore. too much other entertainment these days. also, although less important than general lifestyle shifts away from pub life, the smoking ban in pubs doesn't help either.

decline in pub life is particularly bad news for guinness as it is a almost entirely a draught beer.
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Old Mar 18th, 2007, 04:52 PM
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I would think Smithwicks would be up there.
I don't think I ever tried Budwieser when I was there. I do remember the local I was hanging with a tall boy. I may've had a sip,I was too wasted to remember.
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