Mountain near London?

Nov 11th, 2013, 04:47 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,631
There's always Mount Batten near Windsor. It's a popular destination for hikers.
Rubicund is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 04:52 AM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 12,811
Groan Rubicund
hetismij2 is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 05:41 AM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
Anyone who doesn't consider the ascent of Snowden, from Trefyn and Cym Idwal to be a mountain has my respect.
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 05:57 AM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 2,522
What if you went up a hill but came down a mountain? ;^)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Eng...own_a_Mountain
ParisAmsterdam is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 06:23 AM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
There is a debt mountain in Madrid.
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 07:36 AM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 7,561
From the wikipedia entry on The Englishman Who . . . :In regard to its humorous and affectionate description of the locals, the film has often been compared with Waking Ned Devine, a comedy film written and directed by Kirk Jones.

I saw both. Waking Ned Devine was far superior.

And in the UK, mountains are little more than large hills - the highest isn't even 4500 feet (4435 = Ben Nevis), less than 85% of Denver's official elevation.
BigRuss is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 07:50 AM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 77,701
Anyone who doesn't consider the ascent of Snowden, from Trefyn and Cym Idwal to be a mountain has my respect.>

Me too having gone from the summit down that route and it was very hairy and turned out to be rather scary for me - I did not realize how rugged the trail would become. This is a mountain for all reasons OP want.

the main trail up Snowden is easy - a wide path along the railway but going down to the east needs proper shoes (which I did not have) - so anyone who says Snowdon ain't a mountain simply has not climbed it from what Dickie Gr says don't know what they're talking about.

From Bangor you can take buses to the city where the steam train trundles up Snowdon - if you go down the rugged way I did then you can get a bus after you reach the bottom back to Bangor - Llandudno makes a sweet base as does Conwy - Bangor being a rather blah city IME.
PalenQ is online now  
Nov 11th, 2013, 08:20 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,963
"...And in the UK, mountains are little more than large hills - the highest isn't even 4500 feet (4435 = Ben Nevis), less than 85% of Denver's official elevation...."

The funny part about that: Denver is on the flat, not in the mountains, but at mile-high altitude.
michelhuebeli is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 08:25 AM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
http://hillcraftguidedwalking.com/pa...download=nokia

I wouldn't take this likely, we are joking but this route is dangerous in anything but good weather.
Devil's Kitchen is not to be taken lightly.

Altitude : same issue with Jo'burg, nearly 6000ft.
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 08:39 AM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
"take this lightly" : sick of this iPad.
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 08:46 AM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 77,701
Ah Dickie - that rocky cascade leading down to the lake - I had to scramble from boulder to boulder - thank God I could see the lake and the end of the scramble or I would have freaked out not knowing if I was going on the right course!

Thanks for the memories!
PalenQ is online now  
Nov 11th, 2013, 09:07 AM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 12,811
Pedant alert. It's Tryfan. Cwm Idwal is glorious.
You need really good footwear, and clothing for such things, even in July.
Personally I would not consider Snowdon in July. Just too crowded, a real anticlimax after a good walk up. Plenty of other challenging mountains in the area. A good map is essential, a guide maybe helpful.
hetismij2 is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 09:25 AM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,086
There is actually no real definition of a mountain, so any disagreement about whether something is or isn't one is meaningless.

One definition is: "a large natural elevation of the earth's surface rising abruptly from the surrounding level; a large steep hill." That 'large
steep hill' allows pretty much anything to be called a mountain.

What I think is more important is how difficult getting up may be and whether the person attempting it is properly equipped and experienced. People have died on relatively small 'mountains' such as Snowdon or Ben Nevis because they thought it would be a simple walk in the park. On Ben Nevis, little as it is in relative terms as a mountain, very experienced people have literally walked off the edge in cloud cover.


Given the way the OP worded his question, I would wonder if they have any actual experience in 'hill walking' or 'mountain climbing'.

I would not personally plan to go up Snowdon or Ben Nevis without proper gear including hiking shoes/boots, food, water, rain gear, emergency shelter.
dulciusexasperis is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 09:25 AM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
Yes - but the OP hasn;t made it clear if they will have appropriate shoes/gear for mountain climbing (not something one would usually take on a vacation to London).

Hence the question about walking/hiking versus actually climbing.
nytraveler is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 09:42 AM
  #35  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 1,289
Funny how the pendulum has swung from ain't no mountains here to "emergency shelter".

Recall that it is July -- I don't think anyone is going to starve to death. Check the weather before you go but no need for the scare tactics. Good shoes, a waterproof jacket and some water should be fine. Pick one of the numerous paths that can be completed without scrambling.

http://www.mountainwalk.co.uk/walkingsnowdon.html
indy_dad is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 10:30 AM
  #36  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 77,701
. Check the weather before you go but no need for the scare tactics>

Well I was scared to death, kind of - but I did not do research and may have lost the official trail - anyway ending up scrambling from boulder to boulder and fear of falling and breaking a limb did indeed scare me - so do some research to take a proper trail - I must have got off the trail and ended up inching down to safety.
PalenQ is online now  
Nov 11th, 2013, 12:03 PM
  #37  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,010
I hope the OP doesn't mind too much, but this has been a very amusing thread, as I knew it would be when someone asked for a mountain outside of London.

So thanks, OP for being a good sport, and in the end you did get a lot of very good information!

And I enjoyed reading it, tho' there is not mountain climbing in my future, there will be a trip to London.
taconictraveler is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 12:21 PM
  #38  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 12,811
Yes it is July, but it is also quite possible to have thick cloud, sudden storms or just plain get lost. I know a guy who is with the mountain rescue in the Lakes. He regularly has to risk his life, in the summer, to rescue people ill equipped on mountains on the Lakes.
I know Snowdonia, and n
know what the weather can be, even in July.
Why should others have to risk their lives to rescue people who don't take the mountains seriously?
hetismij2 is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 12:27 PM
  #39  
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,710
English/Welsh weather ?

In each of the last 10 odd years, at least one of my friends has done the 3 peaks on the longest day.

Last year was the first year in many that the conditions have not been diabolical.

Of course the weather north of Gretna is always glorious from March to September.
Dickie_Gr is offline  
Nov 11th, 2013, 12:31 PM
  #40  
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 8,659
Just climb to the top of St.Paul's Cathedral. You'll feel like you climbed a mountain.

maitaitom is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:58 PM.