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Monday fun (we need it). Would you pass the 'British Citizenship' test?

Monday fun (we need it). Would you pass the 'British Citizenship' test?

Oct 31st, 2005, 01:51 PM
  #41  
 
Join Date: May 2005
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I will flunk my citizenship test by stating that Ray Wilson was the chief fireman and Captain Flack played Left back for the '66 World cup winners.
willit is offline  
Oct 31st, 2005, 04:36 PM
  #42  
 
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10

And I hadn't even wanted to apply for British citizenship, much less get on the district council!
easytraveler is offline  
Oct 31st, 2005, 05:23 PM
  #43  
 
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8.

Does this mean I have to start eating haggis for breakfast?
kopp is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 02:35 AM
  #44  
 
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Willit: You are obviously a morris dancing, queue happy, warm beer drinking, fond of dogs, but hates children sort of a bloke.

Well done.
david_west is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 03:21 AM
  #45  
 
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"keeping its black population in chains."

Gee, there was a nasty rumor that the British trans-Atlantic slave trade was quite a booming business a few centuries ago.
Carrybean is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 03:24 AM
  #46  
 
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And the US has had at least 5 black elected Senators & I believe one or 2 Native American.
Carrybean is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 05:34 AM
  #47  
 
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I got 13, which both surprised and delighted me, but have never heard of 112 being a number to alert the emergency services. And more to the point, why would I, as a British citizen, need to know that?!

Tallulah is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 06:50 AM
  #48  
 
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I believe 112 is the common emergency number across the EU - it's an extra to the 999 in the UK.

The Guardian had some extracts from the Home Office's practice questions this morning (rather than the BBC's tongue-in-cheek ones), but not on their website for some reason; likewise I can't find any 'official' questions online - everything points you back to buying the Home Office's official guide!
PatrickLondon is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 02:59 PM
  #49  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
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I'm scared to sit the British Citizenship Test in case I pass.
Barbara, "In Britain you swear loyalty to the Queen"? Some do, many don't. In some parts of "her kingdom" the queen reigns only with the concent of the people, as have all her predecessors since 1320.
Craigellachie is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 03:17 PM
  #50  
 
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Aw Naw! 11 out of 14! O mo chreach!
Thankfully I've never owned a dog or been divorced or I could have been in serious danger of having to fight Prince William for the throne. Would I be disqualified for refusing to swear loyalty to myself?
Craigellachie is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 04:39 PM
  #51  
 
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If a new set of questions isn't dished up every few days the whole exercise will be meaningless, so somebody will have to be kept very busy compiling a massive and constantly-changing Trivial Pursuit of British manners and mores.

A Buckingham Palace spokesman had difficulty answering the question "Who is the head of the Church of England?" And knowing one national day (which is all most of us have) might be a reasonable ask, but four?

And applicants from non-English-speaking backgrounds whose English is not good enough to sit the test will instead be asked to supply "a certificate demonstrating a steadily improving grasp of the language". Right, that'll do the trick. Should carry about as much weight as a Sydney cab-driver's street navigation test.
Neil_Oz is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 06:45 PM
  #52  
 
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I am British but have made my home in the US for a number of years. I got 8.

Want to try the Naturalization self test for the US (100 questions)go to www.uscis.gov - click on office of citizenship. Unsure how they decide what questions they will ask you during the actual test which is in an oral format. So, how did you do?

Sandy

SandyBrit is offline  
Nov 1st, 2005, 08:07 PM
  #53  
 
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As a non-citizen with only a general interest in world affairs (and trivia) I scored a disappointing 8/14 (57%) on the British test but 96/100 on the American, which was pretty easy. As my father was English-born though I wouldn't need to sit the test to be issued with a British passport.
Neil_Oz is offline  
Nov 2nd, 2005, 02:33 AM
  #54  
 
Join Date: May 2005
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I found the US citizenship test quite straightforward, although there are some interesting points. In the war of Liberation, the US apparently fought the English. I am sure the Scots, Irish and Welsh will be glad to be absolved from the blame.

I am also curious as to the "who was president during the civil war" question - Do Americans consider the North to be the "True US", if not, then surely there was no one president ?
willit is offline  
Nov 2nd, 2005, 04:33 AM
  #55  
 
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History is written by the winner, and so are their citizenship questions...



PatrickLondon is offline  
Nov 2nd, 2005, 04:58 AM
  #56  
oldie
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I'm interested that the "Americans" fought the "English".

It always amuses me that Americans forget what nationality those colonists were.

They also never seem to know how many loyalists there were among those colonists and how many British politicians were in favour of independence.
 
Nov 2nd, 2005, 05:33 AM
  #57  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
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Hmm. It seems I am as much of a septic as a limey. That ain't right. No siree bob!

I haven't got the hair to be American. To get american hair takes years of hard work.
david_west is offline  
Nov 2nd, 2005, 06:24 AM
  #58  
 
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No, but goodness, you do smell (ho, ho, ho.....)
sheila is offline  
Nov 2nd, 2005, 07:05 AM
  #59  
 
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Willit-your question about who was President during the Civil War (which is capitalized, by the way) is absurd. The so-called "President" of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis-was not such at all-it was an illigitimate and unlawful appointment from the get-go.

President Lincoln, a corporate lawyer by profession, was the only President during the time period in question, and stated this nonsense involving secession to be "legally void." In a speech, he advised in no uncertain terms that he would use force to maintain federal property that was otherwise seized by the secessionists and to collect those federal taxes, duties, etc. that were owed to the Govt. He did make good on his promise, in addition to calling for restoration of the bonds of union.
Spygirl is offline  
Nov 2nd, 2005, 07:17 AM
  #60  
 
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Spygirl

A genuine thank you for the history lesson.
To me, the Civil War (capitalized) would be the one that occurred in the 16 hundreds involving the Royalists and the forces of Parliament.
willit is offline  

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