milk in Cappuccino

Apr 11th, 2007, 03:47 AM
  #41  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
At the risk of seeming po-faced, is it possible that some people don't know that 'latte' is the Italian for milk ? If I ordered latte, milk is what I would expect.
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 04:10 AM
  #42  
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 45,322
Hello Caroline. Latte in Italian does indeed mean milk. But for some reason in the US "latte" is used as a description of coffee with milk..I don't know why. Perhaps it is like the word biscotti..which is plural..but no one seems to know that either. Words get different meanings over the decades and we have so many people here in the US that had parents or actually now grandparents or great grandparents that came from various areas of Italy that the meanings become changed over the generations. And then when ancestors go back to the "old country" they of course think they know the language and there is confusion. And also, dialects. So perhaps some dialects in Italy when the word "latte" was used did mean coffee with milk..I sure don't know.

I do know that my son-in-law who was born, raised and lived in Rome until about 8 years ago gets very confused in regards to second and third etc. generation American/Italians, their interruption of the Italian language, their interruption of Italian cooking etc. But I imagine that is true with a lot of immigrants.
LoveItaly is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 04:28 AM
  #43  
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 6,282
Hi LoveItaly. Interesting thoughts, thanks.

What really annoys me here in the UK is "a panini, two paninis" (sometimes even "two panini's") but I think that's already a lost cause - sigh.
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 04:57 AM
  #44  
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 479
Dear Daneille and LoveItaly,
I've always assumed that Australians started ordering "latte" because they were too lazy to say the two words [and perhaps because they didn't know what "latte" means]. In my case it was the former, and I was once corrected at an Italian counter in a foodhall here in Sydney: "Ah, you mean 'caffee latte'!" It did, however, remind me of the time I ordered a "coffee with milk" in Edinburgh, and was given a cup of milk coffee and a glass of milk.
Suelynne is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 05:11 AM
  #45  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 41
The last time we were in England coffee with milk was simply "white with". Go figure.
plpreston is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 05:18 AM
  #46  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,863
Actually in France, one just orders a "crème" instead of saying "café crème." Anybody who says "café crème" or "café au lait" is clearly a foreigner. However, people have "café au lait" at home and call it that. And in a café, even though you call it a "crème" they just use milk.
kerouac is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 05:20 AM
  #47  
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 2,580
The last time I was in the US, coffee came as black or "regla"

Coffee bars were very popular in Britain in the 50s. They served cappuccino, but for some reason the places were called espresso bars.
There are still some older folk who confuse the two.
MissPrism is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 06:23 AM
  #48  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 78,322
2Italy: thanks for that tip on water buffalo - i just took that train ride twice in January and didn't know to look - next time i will. Thanks.
PalenQ is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 07:19 AM
  #49  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 8,026
beaupeep: Can happen anywhere.

Exactly my point.

Loveitaly: very sorry to hear about your experience!!

Frothed milk in a hot drink is something I definitely don't lose sleep over, however!

annw is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 07:37 AM
  #50  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,414
Hi Sue,

>I ordered a "coffee with milk" in Edinburgh, and was given a cup of milk coffee and a glass of milk.<

That person also doesn't know the difference between "a woman and child" and "a woman with child".

ira is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 07:40 AM
  #51  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 157
I think I really started something here! I've been enjoying telling him some of the funniest comments. Even he had to laugh at some of them. I think his "problem" is two fold.
1. He is a retired engineer and if you know any engineers, they stick to the rules and will not alter a thing, no matter if times change. It's the original way they learned it that's the correct way.
2. When he was on a Navy ship in the 50S, they were told not to drink the milk in certain countries b/c it wasn't pasturized therefore that's the rule!
How does he remember this rule 57 years later when he doesn't remember what I tell him two minutes ago?
Peggy is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 07:42 AM
  #52  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,414
Hi LoveItaly,

>For heavens sakes Ira, I thought the spaghetti was picked off of spaghetti trees. ...

Only Swiss style spaghetti.

Did you see the BBC show? Amazingly informative.

www.museumofhoaxes.com/spaghetti.html



ira is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 07:45 AM
  #53  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,414
PS,

It's the 50th anniversary.
ira is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 07:49 AM
  #54  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 739
"Actually in France, one just orders a "crème" instead of saying "café crème." Anybody who says "café crème" or "café au lait" is clearly a foreigner."

Actually, after years of ordering a "crème" or a "grande crème," I've caved in to pressure. Almost every waiter repeats, "un cafè crème," and most of the French I've heard ordering ask for a café crème.

Peggy, tell him just to drink the wine.
Toupary is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 08:48 AM
  #55  
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 21,863
How could you have asked for a "grande crème"? It is a "grand" or "petit" crème, not grande or petite, as it is modifying the unsaid masculine word "café". Maybe that's why they repeated what you said.
kerouac is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 09:39 AM
  #56  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 6,070
And why do so many people say 'eXpresso', rather than 'espresso', (wherever they are!).

RM67 is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 09:42 AM
  #57  
ira
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 74,414
>And why do so many people say 'eXpresso', rather than 'espresso', ...

Because the espresso machine is expressly expressing the essence of the coffee.

ira is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 09:43 AM
  #58  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 6,070
Not 'coz they're dumb them? 8-)
RM67 is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 09:43 AM
  #59  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 6,070
'then'

Please can we have an edit button!
RM67 is offline  
Apr 11th, 2007, 10:03 AM
  #60  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 226
toupary

you are right:

Peggy, tell him just to drink the wine.

Red wine is a mild but effective desinfectant.


Every one who is in doubt about live cultures in his caffe latte or elsewhere, should take a liberal dose of red wine afterwards.

Or do as the Italians do, to have the coffe with some other desinfectant, as brandy, or even better, grappa.


A ratio of one liter of red wine (vino rosso, please repeat: vino rosso per favore), preferably dark red wine , to a small cup of coffee is what the doctor prescribes. And if you still have to face dysenteria, continue drinking dark red wine. The more wine, the less you give a damm about anything.
hhildebrandt is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:27 AM.