Marriage Visitor Visa UK

Reply

Aug 12th, 2018, 01:08 PM
  #1
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 5
Marriage Visitor Visa UK

Hi !! I'm a Brazilian woman living in Brazil engaged to a Brit man who lives in UK. I've started to apply to the Marriage Visitor Visa in order to give notice of our intention to marry possibly on 26th Nov18 and get married on 09th March 19.

That being said, I've a couple of enquiries regarding the supporting documents and would be very thankful if someone took its time to answer me.

One of the docs I must provide is “proof that you can support yourself during your trip, for example bank statements or payslips for the last 6 months”. I've got both bank statements and payslips, but they're in Portuguese. Should I translate them to English ? It sounds odd having my financial status seen and translated.

Another doubt comes from the doc “proof of your future plans for the relationship, for example documents to show where you’ll live”. My fiancé lives in a shared house, doesn't hold utility bills (as he pays a monthly rent all bills included) and will only rent a place for us after the wedding (when we will apply for “spouse visa”). So what could I use as evidence of docs showing where will we live ? Can I use Brazilian translated to English docs of mine just for application purposes (even knowing I'll eventually apply for spouse visa in order to settle with him in UK) ?? Any suggestions are very welcome.
isabelam is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 12th, 2018, 01:25 PM
  #2
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 73,813
Why not just ask those questions of definitive sources like the British Home Office or whatever oversees these things. What someone says here may or may not be definitive. Have you thought of hiring an immigration lawyer who would be the best help perhaps?

Last edited by PalenQ; Aug 12th, 2018 at 01:55 PM.
PalenQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 12th, 2018, 01:35 PM
  #3
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 5
Thank you for the attention and suggestion, but I want at first to try this on my own and by using the help of someone else who might have gone thru this before.
isabelam is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 12th, 2018, 01:48 PM
  #4
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 597
Please don't use information gathered from other people, whose circumstances will not be exactly the same as yours. Go to the UK government website www.homeoffive.gov.uk for the official rules. Anything else is to honest dangerous and could lead to you be unable to enter the UK and to spend many hours trying to explain you situation.
tipsygus is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 12th, 2018, 01:56 PM
  #5
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 73,813
Of course that was a type from bus- www.homeoffice.gov.uk
PalenQ is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 13th, 2018, 01:46 AM
  #6
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,120
This may sound unrelated, but after a sentence or two you'll see it's not.

I'm currently administering the estate of my recently deceased mother in law. As, I imagine, in many countries this can involve a lot of paperwork.

Ten days ago, the responsible Court office noticed some mistakes in the papers I'd submitted, and emailed me a list of the mistakes:usual email format from officials : "Dear Mr flanneruk.....Yours faithfully, Court Office" . Correcting them required a third party (100 miles away) to swear an oath and email the document proving she'd sworn it to the responsible Court office. By now the emails were going "Dear Mike...Best wishes, Sonia".

Seven days ago, I went into the Court office handling the case and signed the dossier: an official (probably Sonia, but this is England so we wouldn't be on first name terms too quickly) said the final certificate (allowing me to take money from my MIL's account, sell her house etc) would be ready "in two weeks". Actually, it arrived at my house on Saturday, so naturally I sent Sonia a "thank you" email for being so quick. I wasn't at all surprised to get an email a few minutes ago saying "Dear Mike. It's nice to see we're appreciated. Best wishes, Sonia"

My recent experience is that all my emails to UK government officials are handled like that these days - but obviously that can't be guaranteed. So this is what I'd do:

- First, send the bank statement in Portuguese, checking carefully on the Home Office site in case they specify English. Most UK government offices now have fast access to translation into the other EU languages, as well as Mandarin, Cantonese, Arabic and the main Indian languages: most staff will understand bank statement Portuguese anyway, and they'll probably accept a Brazilian payslip, though check.
- Usually (again unless stated otherwise) government offices accept photocopies of UK driving licences, bank statements and credit card statements as proof of residence, though they might want your fiance to have a Commissioner of Oaths or lawyer to verify them. It's often easiest and quickest if there's an estate agent near where your fiance lives because they often have a CofE
- Just explain your plans for where you'll live. Remember they've no worries about people bringing their fiances over: what they're concerned about is people fraudulently marrying non-EU citizens so that spouse can qualify for legal residence here. So I'd give them as much information as possible that would make it clear why you're getting married and that you're going to live together after the wedding.
- It always helps to remember they're humans too, and send them little notes of appreciation. Don't overdo it though.

Good luck
flanneruk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 13th, 2018, 02:13 PM
  #7
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 5
Thanks for the reply and advice.

So about the requirement “proof of your future plans for the relationship, for example documents to show where you’ll live”, your suggestion would be UK driving licences, bank statements and credit card statements as proof of residence ?

If you don’t mind, would you explain a little more the part where you said “they might want your fiance to have a Commissioner of Oaths or lawyer to verify them. It's often easiest and quickest if there's an estate agent near where your fiance lives because they often have a CofE” please ?
isabelam is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 13th, 2018, 03:34 PM
  #8
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,198
One minor issue is that you mention Marriage Visit Visa and then applying for a spousal visa after that. You know, I assume, that you will need to leave the UK after the wedding to do this and can't switch in-country? If you want to stay permanently after the wedding, you need a fiancée visa rather than a marriage visit visa.
Nonconformist is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 13th, 2018, 05:51 PM
  #9
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 5
For sure, that's precisely my plan. Come back to Brazil after the wedding, apply for the Spouse Visa and only when it's granted, move to the UK. Still need some advice regarding the docs I mentioned in previous posts tho
isabelam is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 13th, 2018, 11:27 PM
  #10
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,120
Your fiance probably doesn't need ALL of "UK driving licences, bank statements and credit card statements as proof of residence "

A photocopy of a UK driving licence, as long as it shows your fiance's current address, should be enough. Often in Britain people have driving licences showing a previous address - so if the licence doesn't show the current address, use a bank or credit card statement.

The Home Office may need this verifying, often by a lawyer or Commissioner of Oaths (CofE). If they do, your fiance might find it's easier and/or cheaper to check whether a nearby estate agent has a CofE on their staff.

I agree with not using immigration lawyers: but I wonder if some other poster knows a chatroom on the web that discusses self-managed applications for UK marriage/spouse visas?
flanneruk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 13th, 2018, 11:36 PM
  #11
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,198
The mods on this board usually delete links to other for a, but on the offchance they don't this time try www.immigrationboards.com.
Nonconformist is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 14th, 2018, 12:17 AM
  #12
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 4,316
As you are going to live in UK after marriage, the visa you need is fiancée visa, not marriage visitor visa, which is for those who just marry in UK and then leave, to start their married life abroad. There is entirely different requirement for fiancée visa, which you can see in https://www.gov.uk/uk-family-visa/partner-spouse. Fiancée visa gives you 6 months to enter UK, to marry and then to apply for leave to remain as spouse within UK. You cannot work while you are on fiancée visa. When you make visa application, all documents not in English (or Welsh) must be translated, and the translator must attach their contact details.

Last edited by Alec; Aug 14th, 2018 at 12:19 AM.
Alec is online now  
Reply With Quote
Aug 14th, 2018, 06:10 AM
  #13
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 62,384
Originally Posted by Nonconformist View Post
The mods on this board usually delete links to other for a, but on the offchance they don't this time try www.immigrationboards.com.

Have no idea what you are on about. I've never seen a post deleted for linking another site -- except when it is blatant advertising.
janisj is online now  
Reply With Quote
Aug 14th, 2018, 12:33 PM
  #14
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 51,931
<<For sure, that's precisely my plan. Come back to Brazil after the wedding, apply for the Spouse Visa and only when it's granted, move to the UK.>>

I wonder why you'd want to do that. If you fiancé is going to be staying in the UK the official looking at your application might think that that was evidence that you weren't intending to live together permanently. The fiancée visa would seem to be a better "fit" if your ultimate intention is to live together in the UK.
annhig is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 14th, 2018, 11:18 PM
  #15
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,120
Unlike me, Alec knows about immigration law and practice here. So follow his advice.

Again: good luck
flanneruk is offline  
Reply With Quote
Aug 15th, 2018, 08:20 AM
  #16
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Posts: 5
Thanks for the advice. About the fiancee visa, wouldn't be the the most suitable for me, as I got a good job in Brazil and plan to quit it only when my spouse visa is granted.
After done some research, I've known know a couple of cases where Brazilian women have gone thru the same path (1st getting the marriage visitor visa just to get married and later at home, applying to the spouse visa) and it went successful.

Anyways, still open to whatever new advice regarding the “proof of your future plans for the relationship, for example documents to show where you’ll live”.
isabelam is offline  
Reply With Quote
 



Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 07:25 AM.