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Looking for a Haggis recipe. Anyone have one?

Looking for a Haggis recipe. Anyone have one?

Old Nov 19th, 2002, 01:32 PM
  #1  
Simone
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Looking for a Haggis recipe. Anyone have one?

I love haggis and was wondering if anyone had a recipe for this Scottish delicacy.
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 01:38 PM
  #2  
bored
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Simone,
Check out this site called Yahoo and type in Haggis Recipe in the search box.

Bam, all the Haggis recipes you will ever need.
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 01:42 PM
  #3  
Bert
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I just did a search and got several recipes. There was even an American version of the stuff. I have never had it but the ingredients sound horrid and I am one who likes blood sausage.
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 01:43 PM
  #4  
bored
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Know I understand why I never had this. I would assume this was served with a lot of alcohol to get over the taste

1 cleaned sheep or lamb's stomach bag
2 lbs. dry oatmeal
1 lb. chopped mutton suet
1 lb. lamb or venison liver, boiled and minced
2 cups stock
sheep heart and lights, boiled and minced
1 large chopped onion
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper


This is the most traditional of all Scottish dishes, eaten on Burns Night (January 25th, the birthday of Scotland's national poet, Robert Burns, 1759-1796) and at Hogmanay (New Year's Eve). It is really a large round sausage; the skin being a sheep's paunch. The finest haggis of all is made with deer liver, served to the skirl of the pipes, cut open with a traditional 'sgian dubh' (black stocking knife) and accompanied by small glasses of neat Scotch whisky. This recipes dates from 1856.

Toast oatmeal slowly until crisp. Mix all ingredients (except stomach bag) together. Add stock. Fill bag to just over half full, press out air, and sew up securely. Have ready a large pot of boiling water. Prick the haggis all over with a large pin so it doesn't burst. Boil slowly for 4-5 hours. Serve with clapshot.
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 01:43 PM
  #5  
bored
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Now I understand why I never had this. I would assume this was served with a lot of alcohol to get over the taste

1 cleaned sheep or lamb's stomach bag
2 lbs. dry oatmeal
1 lb. chopped mutton suet
1 lb. lamb or venison liver, boiled and minced
2 cups stock
sheep heart and lights, boiled and minced
1 large chopped onion
1/2 tsp. cayenne pepper
1/2 tsp. allspice
1/2 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper


This is the most traditional of all Scottish dishes, eaten on Burns Night (January 25th, the birthday of Scotland's national poet, Robert Burns, 1759-1796) and at Hogmanay (New Year's Eve). It is really a large round sausage; the skin being a sheep's paunch. The finest haggis of all is made with deer liver, served to the skirl of the pipes, cut open with a traditional 'sgian dubh' (black stocking knife) and accompanied by small glasses of neat Scotch whisky. This recipes dates from 1856.

Toast oatmeal slowly until crisp. Mix all ingredients (except stomach bag) together. Add stock. Fill bag to just over half full, press out air, and sew up securely. Have ready a large pot of boiling water. Prick the haggis all over with a large pin so it doesn't burst. Boil slowly for 4-5 hours. Serve with clapshot.
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 03:45 PM
  #6  
bill
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Simone

Sadly, the web page "Lloyd's World of Haggis" is gone. It was a fabulous and amusing list of recipes and other haggis related info. But there are plenty more. My suggestion is that you not try to make it. It requires an enormous amount of time and makes a huge mess. The blanching of the stomach with the opening hanging out of the pot so the insides can drain is particularly vile. I understand the the stench is unbearable.

The other problem is that authentic haggis is apparently illegal in the US. The FDA frowns on some of the ingredients. There are numerous recipies for Americanized haggis and something called mock haggis which looks something like meatloaf but I'm sure tastes quite a bit different. As I remember, it's not made with Ritz Crackers.

Lamb Etc makes a palateable version of the stuff and you can buy it by the pound. You have to pay for the container that they ship it in, but if you return it for your next order, I believe there is no additional charge. That is assuming you want a second order. Here is there website
http://www.tcfb.com/lambetc/
I had there cuisine and as haggis goes, it was pretty good. We forgot do soak it with liberal amounts of Whisky and Drambuie. That apparently helps. We managed to drink liberal amounts of the former, none-the-less.

The best recipe I've heard calls for you to add a rock to the water while you are boiling the haggis. When the boiling is complete, you are to throw away the haggis and eat the rock.

bon-appetit

Bill
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 04:29 PM
  #7  
ochaye
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Burns supper is a real occasion in our household.

The menu is oatcakes and smoked salmon, followed by the haggis, then roast stirkit (beef) served with neaps and tatties, and tipsy laird for pudding.

The only drinks allowed at the table are spring water and single malt.

The haggis is paraded in with piping and is eaten following a recitation of the Master's Ode.

The haggis is made by a local french-canadian butcher and is the perfect blend of texture, taste and spice. To my amazement, even the children want seconds.

Some of you should try it (but don't look at it !)
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 07:57 PM
  #8  
Jinx Hoover
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For shame! Don't ye know that haggis are wee beasties that scurry around in the gorse waiting to pounce on wayward golfers who venture in?
Ask any well-lubricated Scottish caddie and he will warn ye not to be pokin' around in the yellow bushes!

Haste ye back,

Jinx Hoover
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 08:02 PM
  #9  
eek
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Where does one purchase a sheep or a lamb's stomach bag?
 
Old Nov 19th, 2002, 08:12 PM
  #10  
haggis
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You cannot just buy a sheep's stomach to make proper haggis.

You must hand raise the sheep. Slaughter it yourself. Give all the good bits to the English. Keep only the cr*p for yourself. Get drunk. Call yourself proud for eating it.
 
Old Nov 20th, 2002, 05:14 AM
  #11  
eek
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Oh...well, that explains many other things.
 
Old Nov 20th, 2002, 06:22 AM
  #12  
cap
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I was told once by a chef friend that there is only one company in the entire U.S. that has USDA permission to sell sheep stomach, and food cooked in sheep stomachs, for human consumption. The company is somewhere in NJ, I think. It is the only domestic source of haggis.

Haggis is delicious. Kind of like a warm nutty country pate.
 
Old Nov 20th, 2002, 07:05 AM
  #13  
John
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Hardly traditional, but we use a "baking bag" for our near-Haggis experiences in January, and it works fine. (Baked, not boiled.)

I am looking around the house for my copy of "Address to a Vegan Haggis" which we recite for our (unfortunate) vegetarian friends at Burns Night, before we serve them their Franch ragout, O How Unfit!
 
Old Jan 3rd, 2003, 08:02 AM
  #14  
Kurt
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Haggis is quite tasty. I love it. I love it so much
 
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