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London, Vienna, Prague - 3 Cities , No Car

London, Vienna, Prague - 3 Cities , No Car

Old Mar 23rd, 2015, 08:26 AM
  #41  
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RM67,

Thanks for the great tips. The wife and I are big fans of Vietnamese food. We also enjoy going to interesting neighborhoods off the beaten track. After a long day of sight seeing in central London, Shoreditch would be a good change of pace. I'd never even heard of it before, thanks!

BTW what's the difference between Overground and DLR ? Should I get an oystercard for 2 days in London?

As a sidenote, lots of tourists enjoy going off the beaten track. The other day my wife and I were eating in a Thai restaurant in Elmhurst, Queens, NYC and there was a group of tourists sitting at the next table, NYC guidebooks in hand. (For anyone coming to NYC , it's Ayada Thai for great, cheap, spicy Thai food!)
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Old Mar 23rd, 2015, 08:35 AM
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An Oystercard will minimise travel costs relative to single fares, capping at no more than the daily rate of a travel card - so even though you are only to be there two days, then yes a Pay-As-You Go Oyster might work ok for you. You can use your Oystercard forbr />
- The tube network.
- The DLR (which is the mainly elevated light railway that serves Docklands and parts of the East End).
- When I say 'overground' I am referring to the London bit of the national rail network, parts of which you can use your Oystercard on.
-It also works on buses.
- It can be used for discounts on SOME riverboat services - you have to be careful which one's you get on though cos I think it's only valid for the Thames Clipper.

There's a payment/deposit for the card when you first get it, which is refundable when you turn it in. If you think you might be coming back to London I'd just hang onto it though for the sake of a couple of quid.

Viet Grill on Kingsland Road if you want somewhere with good food and a bit of interior design, any one of the canteen-like shoebox sized formica replete cafes if you don't
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Old Mar 23rd, 2015, 08:36 AM
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PS Hoxton Overground Station for Kingsland Road.
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Old Mar 24th, 2015, 12:02 AM
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Governator, you're in luck. The Easter Markets at Freyung, Am Hof, and Schönbrunn will all be open on Easter Monday. The Easter Market at Prater closes Easter Sunday.

I checked the calendars for our favorite heuriger. Schubel Auer and Kierlinger are closed Easter Sunday and Easter Monday. There is an Easter Monday brunch at Mayer am Pfarrplatz, the heuriger annhig mentioned, but I would definitely make reservations if that interests you. For a more "typical" experience, try to visit one on Tuesday evening. The heuriger are concentrated in Grinzing (reached by the 38 tram and 38A bus), and along Neustift am Walde (reached by the 35A bus).

As a Trailing Spouse I have the luxury to spend a fair amount of time exploring Vienna's districts with my camera. A particular focus of mine is the "Kunst am Bau," the elaborate mosaic designs that decorate what is otherwise soulless public housing. Walking along the DonauKanal will give you walls of "sanctioned" graffiti. The Prater will give you beautiful green space. Up here in Grinzing you'll find vintner's houses mixed in with public housing, and of course lots and lots of vineyards. The second district is home to the Jewish Quarter. The 4th district is the closest thing Vienna will have to a combination Greenwich Village/Chinatown, though that is a very generous description. There are also some beautiful examples of Jugendstil art near the Naschmarkt in the 4th. The old, old streets of the InnerStadt (near Ruprechtskirche) are compelling, too.

Some of the cemeteries may prove interesting, as well. The ZentralFriedhof (Central Cemetery) is organized by religion, generally. St. Marz is picturesque, though a small challenge to reach without a vehicle. Grinzinger Friedhof has opulent mausoleums and markers, only topped by Hietzing Friedhof. The oldest Jewish cemetery in Vienna is easily reachable via public, as well.

As for markets, Naschmarkt (4th district) is the one most visitors tour; the market is visually appealing, the restaurants (at least the ones we've eaten at) are good; and overall it makes for a good first market impression. Karmelitermarkt (2nd district) is small and home to traditional vendors (like the Pferde Fleischerei--"horse meat" butcher) and contemporary restaurants. Brunnenmarkt is one of my favorites for both photos and for shopping; seated in a heavily-Turkish populated area, it is our go-to for lamb, bread, and spices. Any restaurant you should pop into will serve delicious food. At the end of Brunnenmarkt is Yppenplatz, a mix of traditional and contemporary, including Staud's, Vienna's confisserie since forever and purveyor of the best marillen compote I will ever eat.

Something novel might be the Vienna PolaWalk, a guided tour (of various themes) through Vienna with a Polaroid Camera. Friends and I have done it and really enjoyed ourselves.
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Old Mar 24th, 2015, 10:47 AM
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As a sidenote, lots of tourists enjoy going off the beaten track. The other day my wife and I were eating in a Thai restaurant in Elmhurst, Queens, NYC and there was a group of tourists sitting at the next table, NYC guidebooks in hand. (For anyone coming to NYC , it's Ayada Thai for great, cheap, spicy Thai food!)>>

if you really want off the beaten track try the two Pigeons on the Romford Road [next to the Bow County Court.]. They used to do a mean scampi and chips.
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Old Mar 24th, 2015, 12:47 PM
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"$80 will get you a park bench in London. (actually you might be able to get bunks in a dorm room in a hostel for that)">

naw - check Travel Lodge for specials about that or cheaper - some say they got rooms for 29-39 pounds - and there are a plethora of hostels and youth hotels much cheaper than that - Earl's Court overflows with them - well not the ritz but much nicer than a park bench.
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Old Mar 24th, 2015, 01:26 PM
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Small world, Governator. I'm in Middle Village.
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Old Mar 24th, 2015, 02:58 PM
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Fourfortravel,

Wow you're a wealth of info. I'm going to print this and study it. Now I have something to see and do, aside from boring (to me) palaces. Thanks!

Annhig,

I'll add that to my notes.

joannyc,

Cool, I have friends from Ridgewood. Queens is a foodies paradise. We go there from Long Island for all the delicious Asian and Spanish food.

Thanks all.
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