London in January

Jan 8th, 2010, 05:35 PM
  #1  
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London in January

Hi, Its my first time to visit London for business and what luck that it had to be this month on Jan 22. Just wanted to get an idea how the weather is now...is it snowing a lot? how deep is it? I have only 2 days free out of my 1 week stay and have started planning to explore London. But the weather news has just gotten me worried.

Thanks for any advice....
kat7cebu is offline  
Jan 9th, 2010, 01:17 AM
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Yes it's snowy at the moment, but the central parts are completely clear and you won't have any problems.

If the weather forecast is to be believed it should all be gone by the 22nd.

But in any case it shouldn't cause much more than mild inconvenience if you're sticking to the central areas.

You'll be fine.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Jan 9th, 2010, 03:42 AM
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Don't worry. Any problems with snow and ice are out in the suburbs of London, and in other parts of the country. And as CW says, by then things could have thawed out.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Jan 9th, 2010, 04:25 PM
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Thanks guys, really appreciate it!
kat7cebu is offline  
Jan 9th, 2010, 05:21 PM
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Long underwear would be a good packing addition. Those usually compact pretty good and I'd rather have them than not. Otherwise tights under slacks help keep you warm and don't add a lot of weight/space. I noticed that it was pretty chilly inside a lot of places in London.

I thought it was pretty chilly between Christmas and New Year's but I was also outside for hours at a time. The cold wind and sometimes rain was much more of a headache than snow in central London.

Have fun!
Iowa_Redhead is offline  
Jan 9th, 2010, 05:26 PM
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London rarely gets really cold (like New England cold) in winter - otherwise they wouldn;t be making such a fuss over a little snow.

It gets very chilly and damp - but it's almost always rain - so can;t be really cold. I think long underwear is really overkill (it's not Siberia) unless you're from FL or someplace that's always very hot - and start putting on a coat when the temp drops below 75.
nytraveler is offline  
Jan 9th, 2010, 11:18 PM
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Prolonged extreme cold is unusual in Britain - but that doesn't make it impossible, and no forecasting system is desperately reliable. The current BBC forecast for your week is:

It will remain cold for the rest of January although there is a hint that temperatures may recover slightly towards the south and west eventually.

The weather will turn increasingly unsettled which may result in some further prolonged snowfalls - the west being more at risk during this time


Normally, when London gets snow (as happens for a couple of days every few years) it disappears within a day or two. Every few decades, it doesn't go for a week or two - and this year looks more likely than most to be such a winter, though that still doesn't make it terribly likely. But, because it's so rare, lots of systems go haywire when we do get a week or so's winter.

How to deal with it depends on you and what you're doing. Keep a check on the weather bit of the BBC website. If you're planning to be outside a lot, you might want thermal underwear, though since most visitors spend most of the time inside museums or buses you might find yourselves melting to a frazzle if you're overdressed. Above all, learn to understand warnings and forecasts. A weather forecast saying "snow" or "rain" doesn't mean that's all there'll be that day: a long list of cancelled tube trains on the TfL website probably doesn't mean the tube's not running: most likely it's running normally (lots of lines have planned suspensions for building work, and there's huge duplication so one line closure just means you reroute and add ten mins to the journey ), or if disrupted just means you'll wait 10 mins rather than the normal 5.

And, as the other Britons point out, widely reported trains stuck in drifts in northern Scotland doesn't mean London's collapsed. London's got its own set of microclimates, which makes it even less prone to lasting snow than the rest of the country. But, since many of its workers (including the people who write the papers and TV news) commute in daily from places that get snow for three or four days every few years, the disruption they suffer gets extraordinary publicity.
flanneruk is offline  
Jan 10th, 2010, 01:46 AM
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Central London is completely free of snow as of now
palmers78 is offline  
Jan 10th, 2010, 04:22 AM
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Well, NY I am from the tropical country of the Philippines, long undies is a must. Better safe than brrrr ... Oh I'm not letting bad weather ruin my short visit to LDN...Must have fun!
kat7cebu is offline  
Jan 10th, 2010, 04:44 AM
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Yesterday was mostly bright but with a freezing cold wind (first time I've worn my long johns in London in years, if ever). But this morning, the remaining snow on the side streets has been melting fast.
PatrickLondon is offline  
Jan 10th, 2010, 06:54 PM
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Well if you;re from a tropical climate they may make sense.

To a New Yorker (at the moment the air temp is about 20 and with the wind chills it;s about 5 - farenheit, plus damp and windy) current London weather is normal for winter. In NYC we get about 20" of snow per year on average. The snow belt is about 100 miles north of us - they get about 95" per year. (Some years it snows in late Oct and you don;t see the ground again until April.)
nytraveler is offline  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 02:01 AM
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At the airport now...hope central London is all thawed out by tomorrow...
kat7cebu is offline  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 02:44 AM
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Kat, we are currently snow-free!
RM67 is offline  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 03:05 AM
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as some of you know, I'm planning a quick trip early February... I was debating weather to wear a long wool coat or a Columbia/North Face coat. I'm leaning towards my North Face since it was a hood and wearing a hood is much easier than dealing with an umbrella. I'll still take the umbrella, but I hate the travel size since all they are good for is flipping inside out and discarding. If it is torrents of rain, I'll break down and buy a good one.

Never thought of long underwear. I would normally scoff at that, but since I may be out for 2-3 hrs at a time walking, I think I may throw in a pr of silks.

thanks for the ideas.
surfmom is online now  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 03:40 AM
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Good God it's England, not Vladivostok!

It's never THAT cold here (or that hot). If you're out an about in London and you're cold - pop in a cafe or pub for a bit to warm up. (And if it's too hot Marks and Spencer's is always air conditioned).

The only time I've ever worn thermals has been on long motorbike rides.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 03:51 AM
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Depend where you come from CW.

Mr N is in long johns a good 10 months of the year! (snigger).

But I agree it's a mistake to overload yourself as a tourist because you won't be outside much, and you don't want to be sweltering indoors. Better 10 minutes feeling chilly then to be ok, than 10 minutes being ok followed by 2 hours of too hot.

Umbrellas are a pain in the butt. To use and to be near. Especially in crowds. Wear hats or hoods people, please! Or just get rained on like I do, I haven't shrunk in the wash yet
nona1 is offline  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 04:20 AM
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Depend where you come from CW.>>>>

England!

Where the weather is generally clement, if damp.

And any man in tights is either a ballet dancer or an iron.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 04:31 AM
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I agree that if you are doing normal tourist activities, it would be too much.... however, in this case, I may be taking a photo tour where I'd be outside for 2-3 hours (depending on which one I end up with). Otherwise, I agree it would too much and sweltering. (the only time I wear my silk underwear is when I'm outside for 5-6 hours at a football game).
surfmom is online now  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 04:40 AM
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Football only takes 90 mins as any fule kno.

Really it's just not that cold.

If you do hit a horrible cold snap (they happen) then all you need to do is wander down to Primark (all over) where you can buy warm clothing like woolies for a few pounds (I'm told they're like Target but I've never been to a Target so don't know).

Failing that there's oxfam shops all over.
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Jan 22nd, 2010, 04:50 AM
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Surfmom - last February I took both. I wore the long wool coat on the plane, and packed my lined LLBean raincoat (you know the one) with hood - a longish coat - almost to my knees.

Most of the time the LLBean raincoat was just fine, with some layers underneath it. The hood was nice to have.

I wore the wool coat in the evenings.

Kat - have a great time in London.
flygirl is offline  

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