Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

Loire/Dordogne for Teetotaling Couple who Don't Care for Fois Gras, Truffles or Touring Chateaux

Loire/Dordogne for Teetotaling Couple who Don't Care for Fois Gras, Truffles or Touring Chateaux

Mar 26th, 2001, 11:20 PM
  #1  
Jill
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Loire/Dordogne for Teetotaling Couple who Don't Care for Fois Gras, Truffles or Touring Chateaux

Planning a drive through these regions late next month to hike, bike and get out of the city. Would like to stay in charming country inns where we can relax and explore (see the caes, canoe, etc.).

This is a serious question (I'm not a troll!)-- is this a bad choice if we don't drink, aren't in love with fois gras or truffles and aren't particularly fond of touring chateaux?

For example, we were in Chianti last year for a spell of foul weather and were unable to do some of the outdoor activities we had hoped -- if we had been into wine tasting and touring wineries it wouldn't have mattered. As it was, it was a little like being at home (we live in the Napa Valley).

By the way, we always have a great time in France, wherever we go -- just would rather not feel as though we're competing with folks that do love all those things for hotel rooms (this is not in any way an insult). We are flexible enough to head somewhere else where it might be less crowded or better suited to what we want to do.

If you see my point, is there another region you would recommend?
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 04:03 AM
  #2  
PB
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
There is enough wine, truffles and foie gras to go around.... you won't be depriving anyone. If you think you'll enjoy the scenery (and I'm sure you will) in the Loire and the Dordogne... enjoy your trip !

PB
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 07:37 AM
  #3  
StCirq
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
There's certainly plenty to do in the Dordogne besides drink wine, eat foie gras, and visit châteaux, especially if you enjoy outdoor activities. You can hike, canoe or kayak, rock climb, horseback ride, parasail, you name it. There are also lots of museums and local attractions to visit, not to mention dozens of prehistoric sites. Same goes for the Loire. But seriously....you don't care for truffles?
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 07:54 AM
  #4  
toobad
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Stay home. Peoria is nice this time of year.
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 08:23 AM
  #5  
Differentkindsoffun
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Dear "Too Bad", we don't all like the same things. Is it necessary for one to like truffles, chateaux, and to drink to be allowed to visit France? just curious for your opinion because as you have appointed yourself the arbiter of taste and interests. Perhaps you can compose a list of all things acceptable and start your own post.

 
Mar 27th, 2001, 10:24 AM
  #6  
Bob
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Try the rolling hills of Burgundy. Full of 500 year old villages and lots of people out on their bikes. A nice place out of the city with good prices is Chateau de Messey. Web site is www.demessey.com/en/default.htm.
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 03:55 PM
  #7  
Jill
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thanks for the advice. Just FYI, we have spent a good deal of time in France already, and a large part of my family *is* French -- they live in Paris. We usually spend our time in Paris, Burgundy and Normandy. I didn't ask my relatives for their opinion because life for them without wine, truffles and fois gras is hardly living; I am Amerian (live in Napa, *not* Peoria), and wanted to get an American perspective.

By the way, I used to be able to tolerate fois gras until I took a cooking course in Burgundy where we prepared a fois gras terrine "from scratch." And for some reason, even the smell of truffles causes a near-allergic reaction in me. To each his own!

We're thinking of staying a couple nights each at Manoir Les Minimes in Amboise, La Ferme Lamy in Sarlat, and are still looking for one other place (in Dordogne or Loire). Any comments?

Jill
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 04:50 PM
  #8  
Austin
Guest
 
Posts: n/a

Jill--

You wont have any problems in the Dordogne where most of the time the dinner choices are salmon or duck---or duck or salmon.

AH
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 05:24 PM
  #9  
StCirq
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
If you explain why and where you are looking for another place in the Dordogne, I'd be glad to help. La Ferme Lamy is so centrally located I'm not sure why you'd want to move.
 
Mar 27th, 2001, 06:59 PM
  #10  
StCirq
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Actually, Jill, the choices are usually duck, duck, goose, duck, duck, goose, duck, duck, goose.....
 
Mar 28th, 2001, 06:16 PM
  #11  
Joel
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Jill, no problems. Certainly there are few if any restaurants that don't feature the dishes you wish to avoid, but I never saw a menu that did not have alternatives.
As to StCirq's comment, is that iambic pentameter?
 
Mar 28th, 2001, 06:23 PM
  #12  
StCirq
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
No, that's canardic oiedameter.

 
Mar 28th, 2001, 06:54 PM
  #13  
elvira
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
The chateaux in the Dordogne region are deadly serious structures; you won't see a lot of that gaudy, over-the-top ostentation found in other parts. They are fortified castles, designed for combat and defense. Faaar more historical than those silly places (don't get me wrong, I love Versailles and Amboise, etc., but for different reasons). Lots of fortified and walled towns and abbeys, and small museums. We'd wanted to go canoeing, but it was a rainy day, so we took a gabare (boat) tour instead and had a great time. The area is so packed with caves, caverns, museums, towns, wineries (you don't have to drink to enjoy the process of grape to wine), castles and shopping that foul weather won't find you bored.

As for food, we found everything from chicken to beef, souffles to pizzas, trifle to ice cream. If it's offered, do try the wild boar ham. I finally realized what ham is supposed to taste like. Nobody went hungry. As for things to drink, there's a variety of bottled waters, sodas - we even found iced tea a couple of times - coffee, cocoa, and tea.

We did go horseback riding; there are a gazillion places that offer everything from tenderfoot to John Wayne rides. We did just a couple of very easy hours, but there are overnight and longer trips as well.

Do get a really good road map (we used the Michelin map for the region, and it had lots of sites marked not mentioned in guidebooks) as the roads are typical country thoroughfares and it's easy to get turned around.

I think it's out of print, but the book I found that had lots of info about the region was The Companion Guide to Gascony and the Dordogne by Richard Barber. Out of the way places, and lot of historical info.

 

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 12:02 PM.