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Locations of the Paris' Art Nouveau Metro stations?

Locations of the Paris' Art Nouveau Metro stations?

Sep 3rd, 2002, 05:08 PM
  #1  
Jake
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Locations of the Paris' Art Nouveau Metro stations?

A friend of mine has just returned from Paris and had taken a picture of one of Paris' Metro stations with its Art Nouveau signs. I expect to travel to Paris next year and would like to pictures of several of these signs. Apparently they are located only at a few Metro stations. Can anyone provide a brief list of more famous Art Nouveau stations primarily those in or around the Left and Right Banks as I do not expect to travel too far from these areas. Any information on these stations will be helpful.
 
Sep 3rd, 2002, 05:52 PM
  #2  
clairobscur
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Only the signs are "art nouveau" style. The stations themselves are usually pretty modern.
There are quite a lot of stations with these "art nouveau" signs, but honnestly I don't pay attention and wouldn't know which ones are such and which aren't out of my head. It seems to me that the "Tuileries" station and the "Saint-Paul" station have such signs.

You should check the metro lines with the lowest numbers (these are the oldest). In the center of Paris, you will certainly find some, even if you don't search for them.

Try a google search on "art nouveau" and "paris" and you should find some interesting links.

 
Sep 3rd, 2002, 06:02 PM
  #3  
kate
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Hi Jake,
There is a nice one outside the Louvre, one at Place des Abessess, which is the best preserved, one at the Porte Dauphine Metro and at the Pere Lachaise Cemetary.
Enjoy~
 
Sep 3rd, 2002, 06:05 PM
  #4  
belinda
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Let me add that the Ile de la Cite stop is also of the Art Nouveau style. I did not know this, but it was pointed out to me by someone who did know. There is a lovely flower shop just across from the metro stop.
 
Sep 3rd, 2002, 10:14 PM
  #5  
BTilke
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The Mirabeau metro stop (line #10) in the Auteuil section of the 16th arrond also has an Art Nouveau sign (FYI, the signs were Belgian-designed, not French).
 
Sep 4th, 2002, 11:05 AM
  #6  
Christina
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I think one of the best examples that is not one of the ones with canopies (only Abbesses and Dauphine have those, I think -- Abbesses is probably most photographed) is the metro Chardon Lagache in the 16th area. Hector Guimard who designed them worked in that area a lot and there are a lot of buildings designed by him in the 16th, as well as by some other designers.

I wouldn't say the signs are Belgian-designed. Guimard was French and he designed them. It is true he knew and was inspired or influenced in his style by others, including a Belgian architect, but he was French and he didn'ts copy others' style directly with no artistic input. He was a brilliant, creative designer in his own right. Also, the Belgian was an architect and Guimard was more a designer, as far as I know, although I could be remembering wrong but I've visited several Art Nouveau museums and read a bit on the subject and seen a lot of Guimard's works in the 16th arr.
 
Sep 4th, 2002, 11:08 AM
  #7  
John G
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Do a search because this question was asked months ago and there were plenty of responses.
 
Sep 4th, 2002, 12:27 PM
  #8  
BTilke
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Several Belgian architects and designers here in Brussels (which is where Art Nouveau had its heydey) tell me that Guimard was heavily "inspired" by the Belgians. Whenever the French say they were "inspired" by something, I get suspicious. In the Galerie Vivienne, I saw a tapestry depicting the classic "sour grapes" fable. I said something to the salesgirl about Aesop. She looked offended and said, no not Aesop "at all", but La Fontaine. I just stared at her and then after a while she said, well, La Fontaine *inspired* by Aesop.
 
Sep 4th, 2002, 01:43 PM
  #9  
Kathleen
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Not in the Art Nouveau-style, but interesting nonetheless is the Millenium entrance at the Palais Royale (think that's the right stop). It's made from great 'beads' of Venitian glass, in curving strands that arc to the ground. I loved the whimsy of it...
 
Sep 4th, 2002, 03:00 PM
  #10  
clairobscur
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BTilke,

La Fontaine is extremely famous in France. All kids learn by heart many La Fontaine "fables" in primary schools. It's the absolute reference for children's poems, etc...(most people don't know about his erotic stories, on the other hand). It's one of the most basic (possibly *the* most basic litterary reference in France).

So, even the less educated french people know La Fontaine and his most common "fables" (like the "sour grapes" in your example). On the other hand, it takes an educated person to have even heard about Aesop. The fact that La Fontaine just rewrote Aesop in french verses is irrelevant. In France sour grapes=La Fontaine, period. Except if you happen to speak with a latinist.


So, IMO, your comparison with people educated enough to know something about "art nouveau" and its origins doesn't really hold water.
 
Sep 4th, 2002, 03:06 PM
  #11  
clairobscur
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I would add that your salesman was probably much more educated than the average, since I doubt you would find many french people who would tell "La Fontaine inspired by Aesop". Not because they wouldn't like to admit that he was inspired by Aesop, but plainly because they never heard about Aesop.
 
Sep 5th, 2002, 08:51 AM
  #12  
BTilke
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Wow that is interesting--that the French have no idea that one of their "greatest" writers was merely a talented and clever plagiarist (at least in terms of his fables--I'm not familiar with his erotic works)! Why is it that nobody has heard of Aesop? I first read his fables when I was about 8 years old, maybe younger. Are the French afraid to face the truth about the real origins of La Fontaine's fables?
The gallery was directly opposite a tea room owned by an American and popular with American tourists, so I hardly think I was the first one to bring up Aesop. Other tourists were in the store the same time as I was and also commented about the Aesop fables (several tapestries were for sale illustrating various fables).
 
Sep 5th, 2002, 09:02 AM
  #13  
teacher
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Don't tell me they don't teach about Aesopes fables in schools anymore??? That is terrible! Or did someone just miss that day when they were in school?
 
Sep 5th, 2002, 10:06 AM
  #14  
clairobscur
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BTike,

It's not that La Fontaine is considered one of the greatest writer in France, but only the reference for poems taught to children in primary school. Perhaps at the same age you learnt Aesop, but here Aesop is totally obscured by La Fontaine. I doubt that any teacher would bother to refer to some obscure latin writer when dealing with 8 y.o. (that's assuming he himself knows about him...which is far from being obvious). And later, the kids wouldn't hear about La Fontaine again until they have themselves kids learning La Fontaine.

I also assume that you learnt was a translation of Aesop. There's no reason to teach child another translation of Aesop here, when there's an extremely popular rewriting of them already available. The only way you'll hear about Aesop is if you learn Latin, and the teacher hand out some text of Aesop in Latin. And even then it's not very likely since these texts are too much associated with primary school to be used with older kids. Possibly when later learning about old french litterature, there will be a mention in the textbooks about La Fontaine plagiarizing Aesop, that the students will quickly forget.


Aesop may be famous in your country, but here he's as famous as say, Plinus the younger (and probably less so). And it has nothing to do with french people being affraid to "face the truth", but everything to do with La Fontaine being handed down generation after generation from teachers to kids. La Fontaine is a kid's thing that kids are supposed to prudly recite to their parents when coming back to school, and nobody would care about from where La Fonatine got his inspiration. We're not talking about a major writer studied in high school or in university.

You're taking an holier than you attitude, and trying to make a point about the supposed behavior of french people about something which is definitely unimportant.

You're in the same position than someone who would complain that american kids would know about Arthur from the Disney's movie but have never heard about the original "La Morte d'Arthur" by Chrestien de Troyes. How many english-speakers have even heard about the guy? .That must be because they are affraid to face the truth, obviously...


Reading your post, I would bet that your salesman heard about Aesop only because many tourists refered to it...
 
Sep 5th, 2002, 10:28 AM
  #15  
kerouac
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There are exactly 3 art nouveau entrances with the roof over them: Abbesses, Porte Dauphine, and Châtelet (Place Saint Opportune exit). None of the 3 is authentic anyway, having been moved from other locations. The Châtelet exit was only installed in 2000 for the 100th anniversary of the metro (but it looks just fine). There is another interesting exit at Palais Royal with a roof over it -- it's a 21st century rendition of art nouveau at Place Colette, made out of colored glass balls...
(Don't bother visiting the Place Dauphine exit -- it is in the middle of nowhere.)
 
Sep 5th, 2002, 10:43 AM
  #16  
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Aesop was Greek, not "latin". I suppose you mean Roman. Herodotus says he was a slave on the Greek island of Samos in the 6th century BC. If only educated people know that LF's tales aren't original, I guess they did study Aesop in college.
I've never met any American kids--or adults--who believed that Walt Disney INVENTED the legend of King Arthur. But French kids apparently think that La Fontaine INVENTED all the fables. He's being taught as the AUTHOR, not the TRANSLATOR. And they still believe that as adults. Sad, really. That's the diff.
But this has nothing to do with Art Nouveau metro stops. Abbesses is the most famous and with more people trooping up to the Montmartre area because of Amelie, then even more reason to see the metro stop.
 
Sep 5th, 2002, 11:07 AM
  #17  
Marie
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The whole Montmartre area has surged in popularity due to Amelie, as mentioned above. So the Abbesses stop has more tourists around than usual. To get the best pictures, go early in the morning, before rush hour. The light can be more interesting then too. If you want to get a neat "action shot" put your camera on a tripod and take the picture at a slow speed. But beware that French police sometimes think camera on tripod=professional and may demand a permit. You have to convince them you're a tourist, a good photographer but still a tourist.
P.S. Have you ever seen the Howard Jones video What is Love (mid 1980s)? It's filmed in Paris. In the scenes where the singer is running, it wasn't planned, the singers and crew were being chased because they didn't have permits (PopUp Video trivia).
 
Sep 5th, 2002, 12:00 PM
  #18  
clairobscur
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xx1,

Nope, I meant Latin. I just displayed my ignorance.

And I actually displayed it a second time by attributing "La Morte d'arthur", instead of "le chevalier a la charette" to Chrestien de Troyes...
 

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