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Location Of Julius Caesar's Assassination

Location Of Julius Caesar's Assassination

Apr 4th, 2001, 01:57 PM
  #1  
Walter
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Location Of Julius Caesar's Assassination

There really isn't anything to see (stone & "concrete and stone" foundations) but if you'd like to see the area where Caesar was killed, with a *good* possibility of the exact spot, I've written a trip report of this area. It's intrigued me since my 1st visit, it's unmarked and overlooked by most. The "Area Sacra" is a 1 block area (viewed from the sidewalk) with 4 Temples (3 are basically visible). Behind the circular one are the partial remains of the Curia of Pompey where Caesar was killed. HTH Regards, Walter
Go to http://www.roman-empire.net/tours/ro...s-theatre.html you are looking East (the Pantheon is off-screen to the left ~300M). At the bottom of the screen is the U-shaped "Theatre of Pompey", the square area (middle) is the "Porticus of Pompey", and above that is a rectangular area with 4 (Rebublican-Victory) temples (left to right A,B,C,D) is the "Area Sacra" in today's Largo di Torre Argentina. The square building in the middle of the back of the "Porticus" that extents into Temple Area behind Temple B & C is the Curia Pompey. This is where on 15 March 44BC Julius Caesar was murdered. Today all that is visible are the 4 Temples with "D" mostly excavated under Via Florida. The back part of the Curia Pompey (my guess 5M 15M) and the public latrines which were to the left (on the right in the picture below) of the Curia attached to the back wall of the Porticus. Not an accurate picture but good for a visualization. http://www.unicaen.fr/rome/anglais/g...riepompee.html Go to http://www.skuola.net/altro/roma_pagana/argentina.htm this diagram can also be found in the "Oxford Archaeological Guides-Rome" pg.216 (you are now looking West, standing in front of the Temples on Via S. Nicola
d. Cesarini actually a wide sidewalk). The "G" section from the dark lines "|__" to dark line "|" on the right "|_G_......|" is the back (20%?) of the Curia Pompey. The "Public Latrine" above the "F" section on the right (______ basically behind "Temple A". Some seats remain leaning against the wall in the NW corner and the marble fresh water trough that runs beneath the feet of the seated is still intact. Start your tour (you can't enter the site and must view it from the sidewalk except in May-Oct when they have Sunday tours) standing in front of the Temples (East side of the site) standing between Temples B & C
http://wings.buffalo.edu/AandL/Maece.../ac990807.html (the 2nd tree from the left is actually in the right-half Curia site). Below you is a ditch (between B&C-not in photo) which ends across the site from you, at the end of the ditch you can see stone building blocks (~xx meter), in the "diagram website" above this the "_" section of the "|_". Now walk around (clockwise) to the SW corner of the site and go down the stairs to view the "|_" section up close. Go back up to the sidewalk to where that "2nd" tree is and a few meters past it you will see "|" which is the opposite corner directly behind Temple B. This rectangle is the back of the Curia of Pompey, remember all thats left is the podium or base of this building. The "concrete and fist-sized rock" foundations within this area is also part of the Curia. http://www.bowdoin.edu/dept/clas/arc.../a.pompey.html click-on bottom/middle picture.
Turn around, now across the street and under the ground somewhere were/are the steps leading up and into the Curia. "Suetonius relates that a soothsayer had warned Caesar that he was in grave danger, which would not pass until the Ides had come. Entering the building, Caesar now chided him that the day had arrived. "Yes, he replied "but they have not yet gone".
Caesar entered the Curia, where the Senators and the conspirators were waiting for him and took his seat. The conspirators surrounded him with the pretext of presenting a petition. On que the conspirators attacked. Caesar on his feet now resisted until he saw Brutus with his dagger/sword drawn and covered his face and legs and said to Brutus in Greek "You too, my child/son" and sank to the floor, slumped against the base of the "Statue of Pompey" Caesar died (Pompey's poetic justice). My guess and I hope an historian someday can tell me if my guess is correct. Caesar entered the building thru the front (main entrance) which was within the Porticus of Pompey. If this Curia was set-up like the one in the Forum which seems to be the only way that's practical for this building. The Senators would be seated on the left and right and the back place of honor would be for the Leader (whatever he's called at the time. Also the "Statue of Pompey" would also be in a place of honor in the back, but where? In the middle?, distracting, takes up podium room in a small building. Or like the one in the Forum's Curia to the right of the speaker's platform, was the rightside a place of honor, like today?
It seems to me Caesar's seat and the Statue had to be in the rear of the Curia, if so the Statue either had to be against the back wall or in a back corner. So with ~20% of the back of the Curia visible, it's a good possibility that you can see the spot where Julius Caesar was murdered.
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 03:44 PM
  #2  
Kimerley
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Rick Steves "Europe" TV program did a small segment on this subject.The site of his assassination is indentified by a mound of dirt with flowers placed on it. He was assassinated in the portico of the Teatro di Pompeo (The theatre of Pompey)
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 04:51 PM
  #3  
nancy
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Thanks again Walter!
I have pasted this right under your post on Ostia Antica.
Only 77 more days!
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 05:29 PM
  #4  
Walter
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Kimerley, who are you going to believe me or Rick Steves). The "mound of dirt" is actually the concrete rubble (concrete & stone) of the Altar remains, that marks the place *in* the Forum where Julius Caesar was cremated. Later they built the altar and the "Temple of Julius Caesar" (15yrs later 29BC)
http://www.cybersites.com:8080/cgi-b...tres-lcc=x-mcd Today it looks like this http://www.twenj.com/rometour6.htm bottom-right picture except it now has a protective circular tin roof above it. And *everyday* you will find flowers on the altar like this, much more on the "Ides" though http://www.findagrave.com/pictures/7181.html But on the "Ides of March" 2001 as of noon *I* was the only one to throw a flower upon the site I mentioned above). Also no flowers in '96,'98,'99,'00 But flowers are also placed on Caesar's (modern) statue (esp on the "Ides of March") outside the Forum on the Via dei Fori Imperiali. Regards, Walter
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 05:35 PM
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Gerry
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Walter, you are absolutely right. It was the temporay location of the Roman senate. Also this, the Torre Argentina,(area Sacra) is the home of the internationally famous cat sanctuary. I'm sure you saw all the cats.
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 06:16 PM
  #6  
Walter
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Gerry: Of course, they're in all my photos. But they should place donation boxes around this site, usually no one is there when I've visited. I've seen a "donation box" outside of the "Pyramid of Gaius Cestius" sanctuary. And who could resist a small donation for watching these cats frolicking around the ancient sites)? Regards, Walter
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 06:28 PM
  #7  
Gail
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You all are amazing. This SITE is amazing....I am always intrigued, informed and entertained. And printing volumes for my files!

Thank you so much.
 
Apr 4th, 2001, 06:32 PM
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Gerry
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Walter,

The cat sanctuary has a fascinating website at www.romancats.com. Incidently, they back up your story. They say they do tours but, alas, they were closed when I was there too.

Keep up the good work,

Gerry
 
Apr 5th, 2001, 03:26 AM
  #9  
Kimerley
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sorry Walter, I stand corrected.
 
Apr 5th, 2001, 06:39 AM
  #10  
Mariarosa
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Hi Walter! Thanks for such an interesting post!
 
Apr 5th, 2001, 11:29 AM
  #11  
Howard
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My compiments, Walter. When our guide misstated information about the assassination, my English-teaching wife whispered to me that the guide was wrong. Not that I doubted my wife, but it's nice to read that she was indeed correct!
 
Apr 5th, 2001, 06:26 PM
  #12  
Walter
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I'd just like to add this to my original post, again it's mostly just a guess but who knows.
"*Also* in the "diagram website" above in Italian it says (online translator) after (F). <"Seem(s) that the atmosphere (area) in tifo (sito "in place today") to the shoulders of tempio B is the "Curia Pompeia" (G) THAT IS THE PLACE where, in 15 March of the 44 a.C. Giulio was assassinated Cesar".> Which is the *right* rear corner of the Curia??? It seems to me that the conspirators would be in front and on the sides of Julius Caesar, when they approached. I doubt very much he or anyone in power at that time would allow *anyone* to get behind them. Also remember he was warned and was making a dangerous power play at that time plus being a military man I'd assume he was *always* aware of his surroundings. So when he was first attacked he could only go back and then because of the rear wall, he had to go either left or right???"
Regards, Walter
 
Jun 30th, 2001, 04:32 PM
  #13  
Walter
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The 1st website in my original post above is no longer active. So use this one instead
http://www.bowdoin.edu/dept/clas/arc.../a.pompey.html click-on the Top Right Corner picture.
Also since I wrote this 4/5/01 I have come across a book "Caesar A Biography" written by Christian Meier (Professor of Ancient History at the Univ. of Munich). His diagram of the Curia Pompey shows the Senator's seats on the left and right with the the podium in the middle of the back wall and the "Statue of Pompey" in the *middle of the podium against* the back wall. His diagram also shows what appears to be large openings (windows or balconies, shown as " " below ) on each side of the podium. These would be above the ground level (you had to go up the front steps to enter the Curia) and overlooking the Area Sacra Temples behind the Curia. Because of the small size of the Curia, it would only be practical and visually pleasing to have the Statue in the middle rather than jammed in a corner or off-set on the podium, I would think now seeing his diagram. So in the middle |x| rather than the corner of the visible remains seems to be the most likely spot of Caesar's death.
 
Jun 30th, 2001, 04:48 PM
  #14  
Karen
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So you mean to tell me that he wasn't killed in the basement of Da Pancrazio near Campo dei fiori, as the waiter there told us?
 
Jun 30th, 2001, 05:25 PM
  #15  
Art
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very interesting Walter. When I was in Rome, I didn't have a clue where he was killed.
Regards
 
Jul 4th, 2005, 06:10 PM
  #16  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
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I thought I'd bump this on the rare chance Walter has an update; most of the links are busted at this point.
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