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Limited Mobility and London

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Feb 27th, 2014, 04:03 PM
  #1
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Limited Mobility and London

My husband is having increasing difficulty walking distances and climbing stairs due to late onset muscular dystrophy. We will be spending a few days in London this summer and then a week in Oxford . I am wondering if anyone knows of places where we might be able to rent a small scooter for him to assist in getting around. And just how difficult it will be for sightseeing and plays in London. How friendly or unfriendly will London be for a person with limited mobility?
maile is offline  
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Feb 27th, 2014, 04:21 PM
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I don't know about scooter rentals but I'm sure googling will bring up some options.

This site is great for getting details about specific theaters, museums, etc

http://www.disabledgo.com

(I just did a quick google search for mobility scooter rentals in London and got a lot of hits including

http://www.directmobility.co.uk

http://www.wheelfreedom.com/regional...FU6Cfgod-ooA1A

and a lot more)
janisj is online now  
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Feb 27th, 2014, 05:38 PM
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When I had to make arrangements for a colleague for a scooter I did it through the hotel. It was waiting for him there when he arrived for a special taxi. But he really couldn't walk for more than a couple of steps.

Depending on how far your husband can walk you might want to consider taxis or buses versus trying to use subways. Also check with major sites/museums - many of them have wheelchairs that can be borrowed or rented.
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Feb 27th, 2014, 07:54 PM
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all black taxis are able to accommodate wheel chairs
all buses have wheelchair access
for information on theaters and other places try some of the website.. such as inclusivelondon.com

also visitlondon.com has information about scooter rental as well as information about traveling in London and visiting sites that have access for the disabled
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Feb 27th, 2014, 10:55 PM
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Check out the accessibility information at
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/gettingaround/...lity/1167.aspx

and the map of buses in relation to attractions in the visitors' guide at
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/gettingaround/15101.aspx
PatrickLondon is offline  
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Feb 28th, 2014, 06:41 AM
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Transport for London's website has a page with information on access to buses, the Tube etc. http://www.tfl.gov.uk/gettingaround/default.aspx
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Feb 28th, 2014, 06:42 AM
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Oopd, sorry for the duplication.
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Feb 28th, 2014, 07:52 AM
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And there are two useful Tube guides: Avoiding Stairs
http://www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloa...tube-guide.pdf

and Step-Free Tube Guide (which shows you that you'll really end up relying on buses): http://www.tfl.gov.uk/assets/downloa...-guide-map.pdf
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Feb 28th, 2014, 08:20 AM
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IMO for someone who potentially needs a mobility scooter - the tube is pretty much a non-starter. Buses are really the only option. Travel for the disabled person is free BTW, and even motorised scooters will fit on board.

I don't think a scooter will fit in a regular cab - but you could probably arrange through your hotel concierge for a driver/van.
janisj is online now  
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Mar 1st, 2014, 05:22 AM
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>>even motorised scooters will fit on board.<<

They can, if the space isn't already filled up with prams, shopping trolleys and people - in central London, this wouldn't be uncommon, though not universal.
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Mar 1st, 2014, 08:20 AM
  #11
 
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That's true -- 'space available' is the key.
janisj is online now  
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Mar 1st, 2014, 10:12 AM
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wheelchair users have priority, but of course that needs constant assertiveness on the part of the wheelchair user.
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Mar 1st, 2014, 12:38 PM
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Precisely - as in NYC the person in the wheelchair has priority. But we have a different system for strollers. They MUST be folded to take them on a bus and if you tried to unfold you would definitely hear it from other passengers. (Mothers have the option of holding the kid, people in wheelchairs have none.)
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