IS SKIM MILK AVAILABLE IN EUROPE?

Old May 31st, 1999, 07:04 PM
  #1  
CATHY
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IS SKIM MILK AVAILABLE IN EUROPE?

DOES ANYONE KNOW IF SKIM MILK IS AVAILABLE? WE'LL BE VISITING LONDON, MUNICH AND PARIS WITH TWO CHILDREN WHO WILL NOT DRINK WHOLE MILK. ARE WE IN FOR A MILK FREE VACATION?
 
Old May 31st, 1999, 11:29 PM
  #2  
Jan
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Skimmed milk is available in supermarkets the UK no problem.
 
Old May 31st, 1999, 11:30 PM
  #3  
Jan
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Skimmed milk is available in supermarkets the UK no problem.
 
Old Jun 1st, 1999, 01:38 AM
  #4  
Vincent
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In France as well : "lait écrémé".

P.S. : You know, Europe is now rather developed. No need to bring toilet paper or toothpaste either...
 
Old Jun 1st, 1999, 06:11 AM
  #5  
Martha B
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Most of the milk sold in France is UHT (ultra-high-temperature pasturization.) If your kids will drink it, it will be more convenient for you. It can be stored unrefrigerated until it's opened, and even then it doesn't turn sour as quickly as fresh, pasturized milk. The taste is slightly different from what you're used to, but it does taste more like fresh milk than like anything canned or powdered.
Hope this helps.
 
Old Jun 1st, 1999, 07:42 AM
  #6  
Molly Donnelly
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Cathy, we haven't had much luck getting skimmed milk on any of our travels except for in Scandinavia. You can get skimmed milk in stores in the UK but most milk served in hotels and restaurants in the UK and Paris will be either whole or "semi-skimmed" which is like 2%. We just got back from Germany and can tell you that there wasn't either skimmed or semi-skimmed milk in sight at any hotel or restaurant we went to. We did have a milk free holiday there because we too, can't deal with whole milk! If you have refrigerators in any of your hotels, you might want to get some milk at a grocery store to drink in your hotel rooms. Good luck and have fun!
 
Old Jun 1st, 1999, 12:18 PM
  #7  
Walter
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Vincent- It's a legitimate question. I do not know if the original poster is an American or not but Americans are very big on drinking milk with meals. When I'm in European hotels (3-4*) at the buffet breakfast I've noticed the milk is not with the juices but put out with the cereals and coffee for their use. And I usually seem to be the only one getting glasses of milk at breakfast. In the US getting whole or skimmed milk in a restaurant or hotel wouldn't usually be no problem. I don't know the answer, but would most Paris/London/Munich restaurants and hotels have skim milk available? Regards, Walter
p.s. Lighten-up she was asking the question with *regards* to her children.
 
Old Jun 1st, 1999, 03:38 PM
  #8  
Richard
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HUH??? We never saw any'lo fat' milk or dairy n europe.
 
Old Jun 2nd, 1999, 07:51 AM
  #9  
Vincent
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Walter : my boss, who is 300 % French, funnily needs a big glass of cold milk at breakfast. When on business trips, we normally go to the same kind of hotels you are mentionning, and it is true that milk is only for cereals or coffee. But each time my boss asks the waiter for the famous glass of milk, and he gets it without any problem. As for having milk at any other meal in a French restaurant... it's OK for kids, but for adults, be prepared to get that famous "what a bunch of Barbarians" French look ! As for skimmed of half-skimmed... well, if I go to an American restaurant and ask for wine, and am not able to get my favorite tain-lhermitage, vouvray, or cahors (which I would never ask for anyway), I'll just take California wine, thinking that after all if me and my family have travelled thousands miles from home, we can put up with not having exactly the same kind of beverages as we do at home.
 
Old Jun 2nd, 1999, 06:01 PM
  #10  
Diane
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If skim isn't that available, you might consider watering down what ever is. With some kids it is the consistency that bugs them. Traveling with picky children isn't easy. One of mine went through a stretch where I simply had to pack a box of chocolate so he could have chocolate milk. It at least kept him happy and quiet when dining out.
 
Old Jun 3rd, 1999, 03:52 AM
  #11  
Tracy
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Hey fellow milk-drinkers,

The deal with milk in Europe is that it's usually pasteurized, but *not* homogenized (like milk in the US). Because of this it goes bad a little quicker than the huge cartons at home, and tastes different.

When in Europe, do as the Europeans...get your calcium by having a yogurt or 2, and bail on the hopes of getting a big glass of milk.

While I'm ranting, you'll also find that juice is treated like a precious commodity, with tiny juice glasses put out for breakfast -- and, even worse, juice containing very little real juice (they call it juice drink or cordial, watered-down neon chemical drinks). Look for 'pure orange' in Britain, and 100% juice with no sugar added elsewhere in Europe . . .

Just my $.02
xo
T
 
Old Jun 3rd, 1999, 10:17 AM
  #12  
pauline
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It's called 'fettarm' in German. It's usually in the fridge next to the whole milk - 'Vollmilch'
 
Old Jun 4th, 1999, 11:17 AM
  #13  
Christina
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hmmm... I wonder where Walter is from. I think drinking milk as a beverage, other than by children, isn't really an American thing but more likely a small town/rural/Midwestern US thing. I'm American and have lived my entire adult life in large West and East coast cities (NY, LA and Washington) and I can't recall the last time I ever saw an adult drinking milk alone as a beverage, rather than something to put on cereal or in coffee. But, all my relatives came from small-town German immigrant areas in the Midwest and when I visit there, they do seem to drink milk a lot. Well, even there, adults don't usually drink it, but children through teen years might. So, if one is going to generate stereotypes about Americans and milk, I think it would be better to say American children or Americans from rural areas are big on drinking milk. (I am also one who gags on whole milk where you can taste it a lot, like in cereal rather than in coffee or cooking where skim doesn't work as well, so I can appreciate the query)
 
Old Jun 4th, 1999, 01:25 PM
  #14  
pauline
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Interesting topic...


In Europe it's a north/south divide for milk drinking/availability.
In UK/Ireland/Scandinavia there are plenty of good grass-growing areas=lots of cows and in the pre-fridge era, it was still possible to keep raw milk for a few days because it's rarely too hot.

As you go further south, the higher temperatures means that historically, it was important to preserve all the milk by making joghert/cheese. Hence no tradition of drinking milk.

I'd guess that your mid-westerners got their milk drinking habits from their Swedish ancesters.
 

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