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Is it just me or do you hate staying in European hotels that have American names?

Is it just me or do you hate staying in European hotels that have American names?

Old Aug 26th, 2001, 03:51 PM
  #1  
steve
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Is it just me or do you hate staying in European hotels that have American names?

Like the Beverly Hills in Rome, the California in Paris, the American in Venice. Makes me feel like more of a tourist than I am. I will stay at American chains that have authentic European names, like the Flora (Marriott)in Rome, but not European hotels with Americian names. Anybody else have the same qwirk?
 
Old Aug 26th, 2001, 04:02 PM
  #2  
holly
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Steve -

Thankfully, no. You have just told us that the label of the hotel is more important to you than the actual nature/character of it. You could be the poster child for what is wrong with "form over substance" and "image is everything." Maybe I'm missing something. Why do you feel this way?
 
Old Aug 26th, 2001, 04:12 PM
  #3  
matt
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I've got to admit I kinda agree with Steve. It's silly & doesn't make sense. Yet I do avoid any European Hotels w/American names.

Holly -- you need to consider that hotels are part of service industry and marketing (a/k/a form over substance) can be critical to their success. Obviously they must actually deliver the goods. But perhaps hotels purposely choose American names to lure that lucrative American tourist market?
 
Old Aug 26th, 2001, 04:22 PM
  #4  
Ed
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I wonder if some are forgetting that at one time "American" was not a dirty word in Europe, and that in fact it was chic to like America and Americans. Many of those hotels, e.g. the Beverly Hills, go back to a much earlier, and more pleasant, time.

It appears that some Americans have grown to consider American a dirty word as well.

Alas!

twenj
 
Old Aug 26th, 2001, 05:15 PM
  #5  
Austin
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From the beginning of time European hotels were given names that were intended to make foreign visitors--especally the English a large tourist market--comfortable.

Paris is a good example and some of these go back a long long way:

The Bristol; the Brighton; The George V; the Prince de Galles (Prince of Wales); the Lord Byron; The Queen Elizabeth; the Mayfair; Westminster; The West End; The Lord Byron; Lancaster; Warwick and on and on.

Then when Americans started to make an impact on the tourist business you got: The Lindbergh;
The Franklin Roosevelt;
The California; the Beverly Hills; Florida Etoile; Baltimore; Eiffel Kennedy and many more but no where as many as the English names.

AH



Since the English were the big market
 
Old Aug 26th, 2001, 05:28 PM
  #6  
Andrea
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I am absolutely with Steve. It has nothing to do with the fact that I think anything American is embarassing, it's just that I go to France to have as much of a taste of French life, culture, and language as possible, and I feel a bit "cheated" when I stay at the "Welome Hotel" (an adequate budget find in the 6th).

I admit, as Steve does, that it's a bit silly, but I TRY to have "authentic" experiences when I'm in foreign countries, and staying in "The New Yorker" just doesn't add to my feeling of adventure.

I certainly would NOT avoid a hotel that received high recommendations from people because it had an "American" name, but all other things being equal, if I have the choice between "Bienvenue" and "Welcome", I'll take "Bienvenue" any day.
 
Old Aug 26th, 2001, 11:08 PM
  #7  
Patti Suttle
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I could not agree more with Ed-thank you!
Patti
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 06:02 AM
  #8  
steve
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Ed: I think you mis-understand the motivations.

I would hate to come home from Europe and when someone back home asks the name of the hotel I stayed in, have to answer "the Beverly Hills in Rome". Sounds pretty pathetic. I equate it to someone from Italy visiting New York City and staying a the Hotel Roma (if one existed) or someone from France staying in the Paris hotel in Las Vegas.

Just seems to me that it shouts out the fact that you are so intimidated that you have to ferret out the hotel with the name that most resembles a place in your native country.

Let's face it there are so many choices that it seems interesting than someone could find no other comparable choice except the California Hotel in Paris.

As for me, I immediately discount a hotel with a name that doesn't hit the right note with me. But to each his own.



 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 06:07 AM
  #9  
Ed
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No, I understand, Steve. That's the reason I wrote.

Your friends, apparently, think anything that sounds American in Europe must be second rate, and you depend on your friends to rate your vacation in Europe.

As you say, to each his own.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 08:14 AM
  #10  
Joe
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It is unfortunate that a comment as innocent as Steve's had to deteriorate into attacks and sarcasm. I must admit that given a choice between "The Americana" and "Bello Giardino", all things being equal, I will stay at the latter every time. It isn't rationale, but I don't apologize for it either. It is just some subconcious attempt to make the trip as complete as possible. I am an incurable Romantic. I don't give a fig about what "other" people think. But, Bello Giardino adds to the charm of a destination in a way that Americana never can.

Now, for the disclaimers. See, you have to include comments on every posible interpretation of your comments or someone will be quick to interpret said comments in a negative or distorted way. I wonder. Do people really feel better when they have been negative or mean spirited? Oh well, there is the "fig", so, I think I'll pass.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 08:43 AM
  #11  
janice
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Steve, I understand your feelings, and although it's pretty irrational, I have the same feelings. I'm trying to get over it though, because I've become a big fan of the Hotel American in Venice. There nothing American about the place at all - it's just that when you come home and say you stayed there it feels sort of.... lame, I guess. It just doesn't sound like the same sort of "close to the natives" experience some of us are looking for when we travel. But we shouldn't judge by names, eh?
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 08:51 AM
  #12  
Non Parlo Bene
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Frankly, I'm not sure I'd be too impressed with a hotel in Italy named Bello Giardino, since that's grammatically incorrect. It should be Bel Giardino.

Does this work both ways? Would you be unwilling to stay in an American hotel named Villa Firenze or something? I doubt it. What a triumph of sound over substance!
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 08:59 AM
  #13  
xxx
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For reasons having nothing to do with America's reputation abroad or goofy marketing, I balk at staying at Hotel Miami in Rome even though it has come HIGHLY recommended by someone I trust. I won't try to explain it. It's just a gut reaction based on nothing in particular. I wouldn't balk at staying at Villa anything in the US for the same intrinsic reasons. Can't explain it. It just feels wrong. I think it is really interesting that huge housing developments are going into my town with Italian names and streets like Via Borghese.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 09:35 AM
  #14  
steve
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Non Parlo: Your example in reverse doesn't work. I'm sure it would be perfectly fine for an Italian living in Rome and visiting Venice to stay in the Hotel American, rather exotic. That is the same as someone from the United States staying in the Paris Hotel in Las Vegas, which seems perfectly fine to me. But a Parisian visiting Las Vegas and staying at the Paris with the fake Eiffel Tower, I don't think so.
Besides you will note that most of the American chains, Marriott, Westin, etc., keep the European names, Flora, Danieli, Gritti, Europa Regina, Minerva, etc.
I seems to me that the 3 star properties and below use the hokey American names. Just an observation.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 10:41 AM
  #15  
ellen
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Oh Steve! I couldn't agree more. I am booking a trip to Paris, and I couldn't even bring myself to look at the website for Hotel California. I think I was afraid it might look great, and then what? Instead of humming French tunes until my departure, I wouldn't be able to get the Eagles out of my head. I guess I am just a true, shallow shallow person who buys the product for what the packaging does for me. But if it makes me happy, what the heck. If I have to have a vice, it might as well be this and not smoking.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 10:49 AM
  #16  
arosebyanyothername
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I have yet to read a substantive explanation for why this bothers so many posters, or how it actually affects their trip, other than not wanting to tell people back home because it sounds "lame." In fact, many of you have admitted that it lacks any basis in logic. How does the NAME of a hotel makes a person more or less adventurous?? In many other threads on this board, there has been commentary that many posters here are all about trying to impress others, superficiality, etc. Maybe it's true.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 12:30 PM
  #17  
Thyra
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I certainly don't stay away from hotels because of their names alone, but I really try to avoid chains that I associate with America... like Best Western, which is really foolish since I know Best Western, buys a lot of history properties and they retain a lot of their flavor... so it's a weird prejudice on my part... for the record I am not even sure that Best Western is American owned. I prefer mom and pop places in general.. small hotels etc... but if I found a great one that was star and stripes I'd stay there regardless of name.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 12:48 PM
  #18  
PhilKnight
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I heard someone say recently that there are many people in this country who would buy a piece of s*** if it had the Nike "swoosh" on it. I don't normally like to be crude, but I think there is a lot of truth to this point. People place far too much importance on labels. What I find strange is the number of absolutely sedentary people walking around in Air Jordans and t-shirts that say "just do it." The trappings of an athlete will not make an active, athletic person, just as a local sounding hotel name will not make you less of a tourist. How much "authenticity" you derive from a trip to a foreign country depends on what you actually DO on your trip, and the actual NATURE of the places you stay, eat, etc.
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 02:30 PM
  #19  
top
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top
 
Old Aug 27th, 2001, 03:25 PM
  #20  
Joe
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Dear "Non Parlo": If your focus is on the fact that Bello Guardino is grammatically incorrect (I can make my way in Italian, but I don't pretend to be fluent) then you miss the whole point. But, whatever makes you happy. I just employ the "fig".
 

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