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-   -   Ireland trip - need a camera! (https://www.fodors.com/community/europe/ireland-trip-need-a-camera-29692/)

Amita Jul 30th, 1998 01:33 PM

Ireland trip - need a camera!
 
Sorry if this is out of line for this board, but I'm looking for a lightweight point & shoot camera for my trip to Ireland. Can anyone give any tips - favorites or models to stay away from? There are so many choices! <BR> <BR>Thanks, <BR> <BR>Amita

Jen Z Jul 30th, 1998 02:13 PM

I have a Samsung camera with a considerable zoom on it for an automatic. It's a Samsung AF 1050 (a few years old, but I'm sure they make similar ones still). I love it. It's got a whole bunch of options that I never use, of course, but for travelling it was nice to have for a number of reasons: <BR> <BR>1. the zoom. Often you can't get that close to whatever it is you are taking a picture of, so a zoom is pretty important. I like to minimize on empty sky space, or a not-so impressive background...makes pictures more interesting. <BR> <BR>2. Self timer. IE: one person sets it up and then runs into the photo, so you can always get shots of yourself if you are going solo or both of you if you're going with someone else. <BR> <BR>3. Backlight control. IE: say you're taking a picture of a big building from the side that's in the shade and the sky is very bright behind it...usually the building will be very dark or washed out in the photo. Well, this camera evens it out. <BR> <BR>4. Landscape/Infinity Mode: Say you're taking a picture of the view from your hotel window, or a landscape of some sort. Usually the camera focuses on what's in the middle of the viewfinder. This option focusses the whole shebang. <BR> <BR>5. Similarly, it has a 'focus lock' where you can put, say, a person, in focus, but not have them central to the photo. This is nice when you want to take a picture of a building or something big like that, and don't want the person as the focal point. (My husband and I used this a lot...we have many photos that we call our "Where's Waldo" pictures; one of us out in a crowd, dwarfed by some huge structure or scene -- they add more fun to our photo albums). <BR> <BR>Anyway, I'm sure there are other cameras that have these same options, and I recommend you find one with at least these five, and especially the zoom. I have never taken a photography course, and only had my camera for about six months before my first trip, but when I showed people my photos I got lots of compliments! Some people assumed I had a really fancy camera, but it's very simple. Just read the instructions carefully, take extra batteries and film (often very expensive over there) and then take zillions of photos!!! Good luck!!!

JOAN DOYLE Jul 30th, 1998 06:01 PM

Dear Amita: I have a new Samsung which seems convenient and satisfactory--but I've not finished my first roll yet. My tried-and-true trip camera is a tiny Olympus. If you can still get one, DO. They take great pictures and fit in one's raincoat (you will also definitely need one of those) pocket. You will see more icture opportunities in Ireland than you ever imagined possible--so take lots of film and have a great time! Joan

dan Jul 31st, 1998 08:42 AM

I am into photography a lot myself and have frequented many web sites dealing with such issues. Look into Yashica and Olympus brands, especially the first one. If you are interested, check out photo.net. Click on Q&A, search, and "point." There is also a section of the website on camera choices too. Regardless of what they say there though, get one with a zoom if it is the only camera you will take. <BR>

JOAN DOYLE Jul 31st, 1998 06:16 PM

Dear Amita: This is a P.S. I visited my local Wal-Mart today and they had one of the little Olympus cameras I mentioned above for less than$100. I definitely reommend them for good pictures and sheer ease and convenience of use (and I own a bunch of fancier 35-mm cameras. I take only the Olympus these days. Hope you can find one. Joan

Seamus Jul 31st, 1998 06:24 PM

Ditto Jen's comments above. I've also a Samsung - may be the same model, as it also is an "AF" model. The camera itself bears the words "Maxima Zoom 70i" I've used it all over Europe, in just about every condition you can think of, with great results. Particularly helpful are the adjustable zoom, as opposed to some models which feature just a single "closeup" setting" and the backlight feature as so well described by Jen. And to echo Joan's comments, by all means get ready for more pituresque settings in ireland than you'll believe! One last tip - film is usualy cheaper in the States, so take it with you rather than buy there.

Seamus Jul 31st, 1998 06:26 PM

Ditto Jen's comments above. I've also a Samsung - may be the same model, as it also is an "AF" model. The camera itself bears the words "Maxima Zoom 70i" I've used it all over Europe, in just about every condition you can think of, with great results. Particularly helpful are the adjustable zoom, as opposed to some models which feature just a single "closeup" setting" and the backlight feature as so well described by Jen. And to echo Joan's comments, by all means get ready for more picturesque settings in Ireland than you'll believe! One last tip - film is usualy cheaper in the States, so take it with you rather than buy there.

s.fowler Aug 1st, 1998 04:13 AM

I'm a big fan of the Olympus Stylus. It has a zoom and fits in my purse or pocket. I used to carry a single lens reflex and 3 lenses. No more. The newer models have multiple focus points... a nice feature as the cross hairs in the center aren't always where you want the focus to be in your shot and I haven't found a way to "fool" it yet!

Owen O'Neill Aug 1st, 1998 06:51 AM

Although I've been away from the "business" for a few years, I spent 8 years selling cameras. Most of the advice given thus far is valid and I strongly support the suggestion of a small Olympus. Look for a Stylus model w/zoom and if one is available that is "weather-resistant" (not water-proof but very good in high humidity areas or when a minor spill hits the camera). Others may disagree, but I tend to prefer models by the tried and true major names: <BR>Olympus, Nikon, Minolta and Canon. Have heard good reports on Samsung and Fuji. Be cautious about getting one of the new "APS" cameras - they're very appealing but the film canister is slightly different than standard 35mm; both film and processing tend to be significantly more expensive. One last tip: if you haven't yet tried the photo processing service at "Sam's Club", then do so. It's unbelievably cheap and the quality (thus far - I've used them on 5 occasions) is consistent. I just got back a roll of 24 exposures 4x6 prints (1 of ea): total price $2.64 (NOT a misprint!!).

Dave Aug 2nd, 1998 01:22 PM

If you want to do it right, read Consumers Reports. <BR>

John Aug 2nd, 1998 10:02 PM

While it is true the film and developing of the aps system is more expensive there are significant advantages to the aps system . The ability to change from 4x6 to 4x7 to 4 x 11 with the touch of a button on the same roll of film is REALLY nice. Also if you want to use different film speeds the ability to change film mid roll and then put the partially exposed roll back in and have the camera go back to the right spot to finish using the roll can come in handy. Also aps cameras are smaller my Nikon has a zoom that goes from 37mm to 156mm and the camera is smaller than my old 35mm camera that had a 30mm to 80mm lens. So decide if the features are woth the extra expense if it's a trip of a lifetime to me it definetly is worth the extra money. I hope you enjoy your trip. <BR>

greg Aug 3rd, 1998 12:06 PM

Additional comment on APS vs 35mm film. The APS canister is smaller and does come in 40 exposures. If your space is premium, it is a consideration. I use both 35mm AND APS cameras. I trade off quality, price, space, and bookkeeping ease (APS prints date/time and canister ID on back.) depending on where I go and how much I can carry. <BR> <BR>Also, for a country with so much green, be sure the film/processor combination you would be using would render the green the way you want to come out. Fuji and Kodak in conjunction with whoever process them will produce visibly different greens on prints from negative films.

Amita Aug 4th, 1998 02:15 PM

Thank you all for your input. It's interesting that a lot of you recommended the Olympus Stylus and that's one of the ones I'm interested in, although I haven't actually gone camera shopping. <BR> <BR>Re. the APS issue: I was very interested in APS cameras despite the film & processing costs until a friend of mine told me that sometimes the film is bad and doesn't capture any pictures, and you don't know until you process the film. Any feedback on that? Thanks again...

peggy Aug 4th, 1998 05:55 PM

I went over last year and took 3 cameras....1 35mm for color, 1 for B&W,and one APS for something light wait and easy to carry. The APS I have is a Minolta Vectis. I've never had any processing problems, missing images. I love the panoramic funtion....it's lot's of fun and I got some great vertical images. It's nice to be able to toss this my purse or a pocket in my jacket. <BR> <BR>You've received alot of good advice already, small zoom, self-timer. Just remember to remove your film from the canisters and put it in a heavy (freezer) bag. It is easier for ask for it to be hand-checked at the airport. <BR> <BR>Have a great trip and take plenty of film.

Jorge Aug 5th, 1998 09:44 PM

The following cameras are KING: <BR>- Ol;ympus Stylus (no zoom) <BR>- Olympus LT (38-105 zoom) <BR>- Yashica T4 (no zoom) <BR>- Leica mini (no zoom) <BR>- Fuji Fotonex APS cameras (3500ix) <BR>There are a couple of other exotic cameras that go for over $700 that are excellent, but most people don't like the idea of spending that much for a compact. <BR>As for full size 35mm SLR type cameras... there is only ONE - The Nikon N90s or F90x depending on where you are. If you can afford it, get it with the AF 28-70 Nikkor zoom. All other cameras ie) Canon Rebels, Minoltas, Pentaxes are simply "CaCaPooPoo".

dan Aug 6th, 1998 04:21 AM

I don't want to start a Canon vs. Nikon war here, since that has little if anything to do with the question asked, but Canon does have a super autofocusing system (the USM lenses are so quiet and fast) on its SLR cameras. Nikon is only one of the best two mainstream brands. Yes, I do use Canon. <BR>


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