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In France is the trend now to serve water and wine in the same glass?

In France is the trend now to serve water and wine in the same glass?

Nov 14th, 2006, 01:41 PM
  #1  
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In France is the trend now to serve water and wine in the same glass?

In gathering my notes from our month long August trip to France, one of things my husband and I both commented on was the number of times we were not given an additional glass for our wine with our meal. I am wondering if anyone else had the same experience.

We ate in brasseries, cafes and small restaurants during our travels just as in previous years. We were in Stes. Maries de la Mer, the Alps, Lyon and Paris. We usually had the house wine plus a carafe of water. Often enough to be noticeable we were not brought another glass so had to decide whether we wanted to use our single glass for the water or the wine or ask for another glass. I thought a glass should have been brought to us without asking.

Has anyone noticed the same or was it because
a. we were there in August so tourists don't need extra glasses

b. water shortages require rationing glasses

c. because we didn't order bottled water and expensive wine, we didn't deserve an additional glass

d. it's a new trend and it's ok as your water glass IS your wine glass.


I am just curious, our trip was fantastic. Still haven't lost my rose colored glasses and I can't wait to return. Deborah

DeborahAnn is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 02:08 PM
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No such trend as far as I know. Just bad luck, I guess.

> I thought a glass should have been brought to us without asking.

Usually yes, but did you ask once for an extra glass? I would have done it every time they fogot give me one.
kappa is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 02:35 PM
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They probably thought you're in love and drink out of one glass
FainaAgain is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 02:47 PM
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Faina, never thought about that possibility
kappa is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 04:24 PM
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LOL, faina
Deb, that has never happened to us, no matter where in France.
cigalechanta is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 04:30 PM
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I've only seen it for children. And have never been given only one glass - always separate ones - except at more formal dinners - when there's a whole set.
nytraveler is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 07:14 PM
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That is so strange! No matter where we've ever dined, there have always been two glasses per place setting, even when the table is set (such as an outdoor table at a cafe) after we're seated. Everywhere we've ever gone, they've removed the wine glasses (since we never order wine). Never ever have glasses every been "brought", but always included in the table setting.
djkbooks is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 07:29 PM
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Deborah,

Yeah, that's the latest trend. Hadn't you heard? Where have you been?

Sincerely,
Please don't give me another thing to worry about
Leely is offline  
Nov 14th, 2006, 11:25 PM
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Hi DeborahAnn,
Funny, this exact thing happened to us at least 2-3 times on our 2-week trip to France (Rhone, Dordogne, Massif Central) last month! We also usually ordered a caraf d'eau, not bottled water. Each time we had to flag down our waiter or waitress and ask for more glasses. One time we saw the people at the neighboring table (also Americans) with the same problem and my dad pointed it out to the waiter and requested glasses for them too! I have absolutely no explanation for why this happened...
hausfrau is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 12:49 AM
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It is, in fact, becoming more and more common in the cafés, bistros, etc....
especially here in Provence. It's basically a water saving measure (as in washing fewer glasses ) since we've had pretty much drought conditions for a couple of years now, and town water prices are extremely high.

We either drink our water, then pour wine, in our glasses, or ask for a big glass of ice - fill it with water and share. In places where we're regulars, they always show up with extra glasses....

Patricia
PBProvence is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 02:48 AM
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It is quite common even in Paris to not automatically get extra glasses. However, all you have to do is ask.

For informal meals, one often uses the same glass. Many people will have a glass of water while waiting for the hors d'oeuvre, then they'll have wine once they've started eating. But it is not uncommon at all to alternate water and wine all through the meal, especially during the warm months.
kerouac is online now  
Nov 15th, 2006, 03:33 AM
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On our last visit we were given wine glasses and water glasses.

We did notice, though, that in both southern France and Paris the table was set with the forks laid tines down.

We hadn't seen this before.

ira is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 05:03 AM
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This happened to us in Montepulciano. In fact in one restaurant it was even posted in the menu that only one glass would be provided for water and wine and the waitress mentioned it when she took our order.
Micheline is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 01:16 PM
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What drives me nuts in France is that we are not given bread plates or a plate to put a roll on. It seems that the French just put their bread or roll on the table cloth. We often don't get any butter unless we ask either. Less plates to wash, I guess.
Margo is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 01:29 PM
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Drinking water and wine concurrently is a bit odd. But when you finish your glass of wine, what's wrong with pouring a bit of water into it, drink that water if you must, then going back to wine from the carafe? I don't see what the fuss is all about.
WallyKringen is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 01:47 PM
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When our French friends set a table, the fork tines go down.

As for the water glasses, we got them when we asked for water--tap or bottled. Except in fine restaurants, bread plates are not used--nor is butter, usually. The French love their bread without, but sometimes you will get butter Unsalted, of course...which is very good with a sprinkle of sea salt.
Underhill is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 02:39 PM
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Well, I am glad someone else noticed the lack of glasses on the table. I was starting to get a complex, like are we being targeted because we are tourists???

In the States, I can't remember ever using the same glass for water and wine.

Wally, Personally, I like to take a sip of either rather than quaff down one and then the other.

I can certainly understand if it is to save water. My husband and I strongly support conservation of all natural resources. I won't tell you the steps WE went through a couple of years ago during a summer drought in Maryland

Thanks for giving me your comments on what we experienced. Deborah

DeborahAnn is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 07:13 PM
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In September we spent a week in Paris, 3 days in Normandy, and 10 days divided between Provence and Burgundy. Not once were we expected to use our water glass for wine or vice versa. As a matter of fact, we were somewhat taken back by the constant exchange of silverware and plates. Too formal for my tastes!
mkdiebold is offline  
Nov 15th, 2006, 08:56 PM
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Well then, you were in the wrong class of restaurant for your tastes.
kerouac is online now  
Nov 15th, 2006, 09:42 PM
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While not having a bread plate doesn't bother me at all, I still can't get used to the habit of not using plates for breakfast! I know quite a few families that just put their croissant/brioche/tartine directly on the place mat or waxed/vinyl tablecloth. Crumbs and jam get all over the place!

The flip side to this is that when my French friends come to the UK, they are programmed not to use a plate for their bread - even if one is provided they will place their bread carefully on the table next to it!
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