If your in Strasbourg, you have to......

Dec 15th, 2013, 08:17 AM
  #21  
 
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Grandmere, I have been in love with the green-stemmed Alsace glasses since my early childhood, because I always observed how carefully my grandmother would bring them out of the china cupboard depending on the menu of the Sunday feast. Since she was from the Vosges, which is split half in Alsace and half in Lorraine, even though she was from the Lorraine side, she always respected the cultural mores.

I bought a set of the glasses in Obernai a number of years ago, and even though I rarely have a reason to use them, I am very pleased to have them.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 09:50 AM
  #22  
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Great memory - thanks for sharing, kerouac and now I am really intrigued. Will be on the lookout as something like these green stemmed glasses is the type of thing I like to bring home. I don't really like trinkets but if something is known/associated with a region, then I love having it as a reminder of a visit.

If you don't mind me saying so, kerouac, I decided a few years ago to stop saving all my nice stuff for a special occasion. You don't need a reason to get out your treasures.I say enjoy your lovely stemware, even if you are just serving yourself a glass of Riesling (and maybe have a toast to your grandmother).
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Dec 15th, 2013, 10:02 AM
  #23  
 
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You could also look for tablecloths and kitchen towels made of a typical and traditional Alsatian fabric called "Kelsch".

The green stemmed glasses are called "verres à vin du Rhin".
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Dec 15th, 2013, 10:16 AM
  #24  
 
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<< I decided a few years ago to stop saving all my nice stuff for a special occasion.>>

I agree 100%. For years, my parents had a full service of Limoges china (bought in 1960!) which was used maybe twice a year. In later years, they decided that it should be used every day because it was stupid to store it away. It quickly became chipped and 'normal' and that was completely fine. When my father died and I had to empty the house in Florida to bring my mother back to France (Alzheimer's), it didn't bother me at all to throw away all of the chipped china because it had served its purpose, with many happy memories.

As for traditional Alsace wine glasses (white wine only! Tt would be total heresy to pour red wine into such a glass.), here is what they look like:

http://www.myelsass.com/76-206-large...f-alsacien.jpg
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Dec 15th, 2013, 10:18 AM
  #25  
 
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To buy: pottery with a blue design (usually flowery) on a grey background.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 11:09 AM
  #26  
 
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Yes, the traditional Alsatian jugs and pots are lovely. What is really amazing is that I bought similar items on my first trip to Vietnam. Sometimes, the former colonial influences in various places can be amazing.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 11:22 AM
  #27  
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I know, we have lost some glasses here and there, and definitely have gottten a few chips. I always think it is sad to never use the special things...as if nothing is ever a grand enough occasion. So I am glad the Limoges got chipped in the creation of happy memories! Far more sad to be packing up china, etc....that was never used.

Thanks for the photo and so interesting to recognize the influence from Alsace in Vietnam (from A to V....). If I can bring some of the stemware back, I solemnly promise to never use if for red wine or even so much as a Rose.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 11:36 AM
  #28  
 
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Oh, denisea, your comment reminded me of the delicious rose vin chaud we had a the Christmas market in Strasbourg! I hope it is still available.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 11:57 AM
  #29  
 
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If I were in Strasbourg again, I'd go back to the cathedral. The views from the top are stunning.

Looks like you have more than enough recommendations for a day, though!
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Dec 15th, 2013, 01:01 PM
  #30  
 
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Strasbourg is such a wonderful place. Since Strasbourg right now is not the same as Strasbourg at other seasons, I had not posted a link to my previous thread about the city yet, but here it is now: http://www.fodors.com/community/euro...-september.cfm
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Dec 15th, 2013, 01:42 PM
  #31  
 
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There are two kinds of 'special' glasses that I use for specific reasons.

I'm a Gewurtztraminer fan and would never think of drinking a Gewurtz out of anything other than our 'Gewurtz' (as we think of them) glasses.

We had a little accident and one was broken. On a subsequent visit to the Trimbach store in Ribeauville, we were able to buy a matching 3 more as 'back up' and replacement of the broken one.

If you do consider buying some denisia, bear in mind that like most things,they vary in quality. Here is a selection to look at. You can buy a set quite cheaply with decals stuck on them or you can buy a set of cut crystal for far more money. http://www.everyverre.com/lang-en/11-verres-d-alsace
Those are all relatively cheap examples.

Also note the ones called 'Roemer' which refers to the stubbier and wider stem. That design is more traditional and actually dates back to the Romans who introduced the shape to the Alsace area along with 'toasting'. The Roemer is what many consider the glass to use when toasting.

Re cheeses, a trivia question since a few cheese lovers seem to be on this post. Have you tried 'Tete de moine' cheese? It's Swiss so nothing to do with the Alsace but one of my all time favourite cheeses so I just thought I'd throw it in here.

Besides it's great (strong) taste which is definitely unique, the way of serving it is also unique. You need a 'girolle' which allows you to make rosettes. https://www.google.ca/search?q=tete+...w=1280&bih=687

So here's my trivia question, what is the world's most 'decorative' cheese? To which I believe I have just given you the answer.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 04:06 PM
  #32  
 
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Kerouac, it's nice to hear that you and others like the green-stemmed wine glasses, too.

I've been thinking about getting out my old Limoges china and using it for everyday, too; maybe this thread will be the impetus I need to actually do it.

Denisea, if you like pretty tablecloths, napkins, runners, etc., there are beautiful ones that are made in Ribeauville under the brand name Beauville. With just one day you won't have time to go to Ribeauville, but I'm sure the shops in Strasbourg must sell them. Upscale shops here in USA sell them, also, and charge even more, of course. They are not inexpensive in Alsace!

MIchael, I believe you are referring to the salt-glazed pottery of Betschdorf. Love it, too.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 07:36 PM
  #33  
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Have never had vin chaud with rose and Judy, will check for it. Yankygal- I am a sucker for a view...will try to sneak that in. Can already tell, I will need to get back to the area for a longer stay.
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Dec 15th, 2013, 07:40 PM
  #34  
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Just checked the link for the tere de moine....too cool. So much to learn and enjoy about this area! Thanks dulci...
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Dec 22nd, 2013, 11:49 AM
  #35  
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Just have to say tgat we samples tere de moine today in Paris. Very pretty and quite delicioius ...partbof a great heese lovers tasting box from Fauchon. Tomorrow is our day in Strasbourg!
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Dec 22nd, 2013, 01:30 PM
  #36  
 
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Umm, just for clarity.

It's TETE de moine, not TERE. Tete of course means Head and de moine means of a monk. So Monk's head cheese.

It is a SWISS cheese, not a French cheese and not from the Alsace region of France obviously.

That doesn't mean you might not find some in a good cheese shop in Strasbourg but you may or may not.

Supermarkets like Migros in Switzerland often sell it pre-scraped in those little foam trays with cling film covering. A handy little 'snack pack' so to speak.

I don't know how it would have been in the Fauchon box denisea, but it does go stale once you scrape a 'rosette' off the block. So it's best to eat it freshly scraped on the girolle.

The other problem besides having to buy a girolle, is that it is a large cheese and so not conducive to small amounts for eating. We have cut the cheese in half and tried freezing one half. Not a good idea as it didn't freeze well and didn't scrape well once thawed out. So unless you can find a place that will cut one in half for you and sell just a half or less, it becomes an issue of how to eat so much of it in a reasonable amount of time before the cheese starts to go off.

Where it shines of course is at a wine and cheese party with lots of people. Some years ago, my wife and I took one to a wine and cheese party at a friend's house. All went well until someone thought you were supposed to cut a wedge from it. They lifted the scraper off the cheese and used a knife to cut a wedge out. Once they did, you could no longer scrape a rosette since you would come to the missing part every revolution of the scraper. So moral of the story, don't let an idiot near a Tete de Moin cheese and Girolle board.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=tete+...iw=786&bih=645

This site appears to be willing to cut by weight and also sells the Girolle.
http://www.murrayscheese.com/tete-de-moine.html#

They have obviously figured out the problem of it being too big as a whole cheese. Their prices for both the cheese and Girolle look reasonable to me.
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Dec 22nd, 2013, 01:34 PM
  #37  
 
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That doesn't mean you might not find some in a good cheese shop in Strasbourg but you may or may not.

Any large city in France will have a decent cheese shop, and La Cloche à Fromage in Strasbourg definitely qualifies.
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Dec 22nd, 2013, 01:34 PM
  #38  
 
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Sorry meant to add this link rather than the photo link.
http://canadacheeseman.wordpress.com...l-combination/

It really is as they say a 'show stopper' at a party.
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Dec 22nd, 2013, 01:37 PM
  #39  
 
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One more note.

If you are tempted to take a Tete de Moin cheese home from Europe, don't.

It is an unpasturized cheese and as such is not allowed in by Customs.
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Dec 22nd, 2013, 10:22 PM
  #40  
 
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It is an unpasturized cheese and as such is not allowed in by Customs.

Not true. Travelers may bring in any cheese for personal use. That's the policy. Whether the Ag agent who finds the cheese knows this is another matter.
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