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I want to live and work in La Belle France

I want to live and work in La Belle France

Old Jan 16th, 2002, 02:20 PM
  #1  
frenchcanadian
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I want to live and work in La Belle France

I am from Calgary, Alberta, Canada and I am completely fluent in French. I attended a French school, grew up in a small french town, and have maintained my French through the years. I have visited France on three seperate occasions, and fell in love with the land and culture. Now, I am looking into living and working in France. Could someone give me some advice or recount their experiences in making a move? A few details on me: I am 25 years old, male, single, currently employed at an investment bank as a corporate finance analyst (we do oil & gas mergers & acquisitions, financings, etc) and I have some money set aside to help me along in the transition. What are the challenges in buying a house or apartment in France? What are the income tax rates? Is there any compelling reason that I should not go? Is there any city other than Paris where I could get an investment banking job? Please reply with any advice you may have. Thanks a lot.
 
Old Jan 16th, 2002, 02:49 PM
  #2  
jimdandy
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First you need a job offer and a signed contract from a company in France. Then you need an attestation du travail from your company saying why they need a foreigner for this position. This then must be stamped by the DDTE (Department du travail et emploi). Once you have this, you must get a French work visa from your consulate in Calary. Then you have to present yourself to the prefecture in France to get your carte de sejour for a travailleur etrangere (this requires additional paperwork such as proof of residence, OMI medical exam, etc). This carte de sejour must then be renewed each year at which point they will keep asking for new documents.

On the whole the bureaucracy was not difficult to deal with. You should however assure that you have good relations with your employer and landlord as they must supply lots of paperwork.

If you are under 30 and want to work in France for up to a year, you can apply at the consulate in Calgary for a special program provided to young Canadians who want to work in France. This would probably be a good way to do some research and gather information for a longer stay.

I do not have any experience with home purchases.
 
Old Jan 16th, 2002, 03:45 PM
  #3  
frenchcanadian
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Thanks a lot for the information and the level of detail. The whole process seems quite time consuming and has the potential for some frustrations. It's comforting to hear that the bureaucracy is not difficult to deal with.
 
Old Jan 16th, 2002, 03:48 PM
  #4  
frenchcanadian
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Sorry, I wasn't finished...
Thanks for the advice regarding applying for the special program. I will certainly look into this, as well as any other information that may prove useful to organizing myself for the journey over the ocean. Once again, thanks for the valuable info Jim.
 
Old Jan 16th, 2002, 04:38 PM
  #5  
jimdandy
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The one-year work program is good because you don't have to go through all the hoops.

I found one of the most difficult things in France was all of the running around I had to do during working hours to keep myself 'en regularite' (a large company might help you by getting someone else to do alot of this). You really need an understanding boss and co-workers. I really enjoyed the French working environment and the people at work. Having said that, I don't deny that rudeness in everyday life (such as you see on some board postings) was a common occurrence. You will need a thick skin.

If you are married or know someone from here you can share this experience with, that will make it twice as easy.

If you have a permanent residence in Canada (i.e. own title to a home or apt) you can pay Canadian taxes only. Otherwise you will be filing a french return (french taxes are significantly lower)

No matter what though, I say go for it, and most importantly GOOD LUCK!!
 
Old Jan 16th, 2002, 07:27 PM
  #6  
frenchcanadian
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Thanks again for the great info. I really appreciate hearing from a person such as yourself who has actually gone through the process. I'm excited at the opportunity to live and work in a country that I so enjoy visiting, and I have a pretty good idea as to how "rude" the people of France can be, although I have come to appreciate why that would be. France is the most visited country in the world, and I'm sure that the people living there have had to deal with their share of ignorant or annoying people. I think their rudeness is a way of ensuring that they won't have to deal with so many of the aforementioned people.
Would it be possible to do the one year work program, and do the necessary paper work that is required under normal circumstances? I was also under the impression that French income tax is somewhat higher than it is in Canada, more specifically Alberta. I will have to research that area as well.
Thanks for your insights and suggestions.
 
Old Jan 16th, 2002, 10:35 PM
  #7  
jimdandy
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You would have to come back to Canada to get your work visa (provided you have the work contract and the ddte stamped attestation du travail) after your 1 year assignment. But this would give you the oppurtunity to meet with employers, interview for jobs, lease an apartment etc. while not worrying about paperwork. You should discuss options with the French consulate.

Canadian income tax rates are significantly higher than those in France. Cost of living on the other hand(particularly lodging and automobile) is higher in France.
 
Old Jan 22nd, 2002, 07:19 PM
  #8  
frenchcanadian
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Jim,
I have been having problems posting a reply to your last message. As such, I will keep this brief. Since my last post, I have done a fair bit of research with some great findings. I have found the French consulate in Vancouver, and a representative in Calgary. I also found info on the "Working Vacation" and on the steps necessary to get a working visa. Thanks once again for your guidance, and perhaps I'll run into you on the streets of Paris. Many thanks.
 
Old Jan 22nd, 2002, 09:01 PM
  #9  
Maurice
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I'm sure you've looked into this, but...
My parents are British. As a result, I am entitled to a red UK Euro passport, even though I was born in Canada. If any grandfather/parent was, you are entitled. Other European (EU) countries probably have the same rules.
 
Old Jan 22nd, 2002, 09:15 PM
  #10  
Rex
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There is (are?) at least one (or more?) book(s) published, specifically on the subject of buying a house in France.

Here's one, currently listed as available on www.amazon.com - -

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1901130908/qid=1011762104/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_14_1/103-9680906-7169445

I read this one (or maybe something similar once). The main thing I remember is that you DO need a lawyer (solicitor or "avocat", I think) - - and your heirs may be faced with some throny problems, if you die while still owning property, but not a French citizen. It doesn't pass straight to heirs as easily as you might suppose, apparently.

I realize that this isn't all that relevant to a 25 yr old single male, but others - - including those in retirement age might be reading this as well.

Meilleurs voeux,

Rex
 

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