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How much money to bring to Italy for 10 days?

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Apr 30th, 2011, 10:20 PM
  #1
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How much money to bring to Italy for 10 days?

Hello all:

My husband and I are going to Italy in 2 weeks for 10 days. All hotels are pre paid and so are trains, cars, etc. The only thing we need to consider is food/drink and public transportation.

Itinerary is Venice for 3 days, Arezzo for 6 days and the last night in Rome. We will likely do a quick day trip to Florence. The 6 days in Arezzo are in a Villa where we will do the cooking ourselves. Given I have never been to Italy, I have no idea how much money to take along. Traveling from the US but an answer in Euros is fine, if that's easier.

Thanks very much to anyone who takes the time to respond. Much appreciated.
NataliyaNewYork is offline  
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Apr 30th, 2011, 11:47 PM
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You really don't need to 'bring' any money (in $ or €) w/ you. Leave your money in your checking account and use your ATM card to take out what you need when you are in Italy.

If you will feel better having some € cash on you when you arrive -- just buy a few € at your departure airport.
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May 1st, 2011, 01:24 AM
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Agree with Janis. Take one or two hundred euros and use your bank card for cash and/or a credit card for your purchases. Remember to advise your bank of your travel so that you don't have the card blocked the first time you try to use it.

If you're going to use a credit card, ask the bank if there is a foreign transaction fee. This can be from 1-3% of the transaction and will give you quite a shock if you're not aware of it in advance.

These days you really don't need to (and for safety's sake, you really shouldn't) travel with lots of cash. And don't get traveler's checks. Have fun.
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May 1st, 2011, 03:55 AM
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Depends what you're buying... with 35 million to spare, there's a nice place going on Capri?

http://www.positanonews.it/articoli/...e_ditalia.html

More usually I used to like having enough in Euro notes to cover the first couple of days' spending, but probably they were easier for us to get hold of in London.

Peter
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May 1st, 2011, 04:01 AM
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Dollars, enough to have "panic money" maybe 100
Euros, enough for the first couple of days which at worst is a couple of hundred but try to get your supplier to give you small notes, 1, 5, 10s are the best. If they give you two x one hundred notes they are almost useless
bilboburgler is online now  
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May 1st, 2011, 04:01 AM
  #6
 
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but I tend to pick them up at the arrival airport from an ATM
bilboburgler is online now  
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May 1st, 2011, 04:15 AM
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Get Euros when you arrive in Venice (at the airport). It couldn't be easier. Just like using the ATM at home.
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May 1st, 2011, 08:28 AM
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Credit cards and ATMs.
Thats all you need!
ured1975 is offline  
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May 1st, 2011, 09:56 AM
  #9
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Got it. Thanks all!
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May 1st, 2011, 03:01 PM
  #10
 
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I go against the boards on this. The first time we went to Italy -- 10 years ago. All our credit cards and bank debit cards were frozen. It took a few phone calls to straighten everything it all out and it was a 3 - 4 hour glitch. And yes, we had contacted every one of the banks saying we would be in Italy during the relevant time period.

There have been at least one time on every one of our trips since Italy when there were no banks around and they only would take cash.


So now I take $500 to $1000 worth of currency when we travel. 2/3 foreign currency and 1/3 US currency.
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May 1st, 2011, 04:08 PM
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<>

That's just plain foolish. There's an ATM machine on just about every street corner in Western Europe. Very, very occasionally, usually on Sundays, particularly in France, you can't withdraw cash for an hour or so - presumably because of some sort of interbank weekly "housekeeping," but apart from that, there are always "banks around," unless you're in the middle of the countryside, and almost anyone will take a credit or debit card unless it's for a tiny little purchase. And if you ARE planning on being in remote areas with few banks and the possibility of people wanting to be paid in cash, a simple trip to the ATM that morning or the night before takes care of that problem.
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May 1st, 2011, 04:38 PM
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Natalyia,

Just be sure to do two things.

Before you leave, and in addition to telling your bank your travel dates,get the phone number for their THRID PARTY SECURITY MONITORING COMPANY! Half the time, the bank doesn't bother to give your travel info to their security company and that is who cuts you off! Call them directly and make sure they enter your travel dates and country into their system....

Also, check what "network" your credit and debit cards are part of. The last time I went, my bank had changed networks (unoticed by me) and I couldn't get cash at most of the "Bancomats" that are literaly everywhere. I had to find larger banks in cities (Rome, Naples, etc.) in order to find one where my cards would work. This was a big inconvenience, although I was OK once I found a bank in Positano where I could get cash.

If you take care of these two items, you should be just fine.

Buon viaggio!
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May 1st, 2011, 04:46 PM
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Maybe it's a Canadian thing but my Canadian bank does not want to know when I am travelling. Visa wants to know. But not my bank for my bank card.
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May 1st, 2011, 08:44 PM
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Never take more cash then you can afford to loose
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May 1st, 2011, 09:04 PM
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i have just returned from italy and i can tell you the prices are outrageous.... this includes grocery shopping... cheeses for instance seemed to be about twice the us price...meats about 25% more.... some produce was cheaper...

eating out is really expensive.... $15 for a medium pizza which in us would be about $8... $20 for one with good toppings....

wine was the one cheap thing....at least 2 locals told me it is not necessary to pay more than 2-3 E for good wine and that is true.... we usually paid 6-7 for excellent ones...

eating simply is the key...
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May 1st, 2011, 09:46 PM
  #16
 
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Natalyia,
Listen to Dayle and Klgallo. Having that currency is a comfort zone. I have experienced the blocking of transactions even though I call the credit card company and bank before EVERY trip. There are glitches, and you should be prepared. Your time is precious while on vacation, and you may not have the time or opportunity for whatever you are endeavoring to purchase. But I usually use ATMs and credit cards on a daily basis for most of my expenditures.

We have always felt comfortable budgeting ourselves for $100 each per day for food, transportation, and incidentals. If breakfast in included at the hotel, that is a break. If not, just a juice, cornetto, and cappuccino may cost you almost $10.00. At the end of a long day, a metro ride may not be as inviting as a taxi.....and there goes another $10.00. A glass of wine before returning to your hotel to change for dinner....and you have spent another $10 to $15. It all adds up rather quickly. We are on vacation and anticipate nice lunches and dinners with wine. While we do not always spend that much money per day, we like to be prepared mentally. You can always go a less expensive route with just pizza or panninis for lunch, and maybe just antipasto and pasta for dinner. It doesn't always have to be upscale dining. Ask the local shop keepers and personnel for recommendations for that "treasure" of a trattoria. Like anything else, hotel concierge suggestions can be hit or miss. But don't forget your daily treat of gelato or "dolce". You will be in Italy, and you will not be indulging like that when you are back home.
Vacations and hard-earned trips are just that. You do special things that are meant to provide an enjoyable time and wonderful memories.
Have a great time.
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May 2nd, 2011, 02:48 AM
  #17
 
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>>> i have just returned from italy and i can tell you the prices are outrageous....

We've been living here in Italy for eight years now, and fortunately - aside from the effects of fuel rises - most prices are relatively stable; it's just that many currencies (the British and American ones particularly) don't buy as many Euro as they once did... more's the pity!

Peter
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May 2nd, 2011, 02:40 PM
  #18
 
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kiggalio, I'm curious to know why you take US dollars with you. I'm not being critical, I just don't understand. What do you do with the US dollars as I can't imagine they would be of any interest to shopkeepers etc?
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May 2nd, 2011, 02:50 PM
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cold - the UK banks are the same - they have no interest in my visits abroad, and this includes VISA transactions.

I don't quite understand why US banks are so vigilant and ours so lackadaisical.

kiggalio - I would take some $ with me, just in case the ATM ate my card. otherwise reckon on hitting the first ATM you find at the airport.

cathies - that's why I take some £ with me - if I hit a snag, I have some money I can change. no need for cards etc. but i am also able easily to take € with me as they are readily available in the UK. for my up-coming trip I will need €300 immediately when I get there to pay for the course i am doing, so as I won't be able to get as much as that out of an ATM all in one go, I'll be taking about €400 with me, which will cover the course fee and the frost few days.
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May 2nd, 2011, 03:16 PM
  #20
 
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"Dollars, enough to have "panic money" maybe 100"

Panic money?

"Euros, enough for the first couple of days which at worst is a couple of hundred but try to get your supplier to give you small notes, 1, 5, 10s are the best."

Pardon me, but is there such a thing as a 1 euro banknote? I thought they start with 5.
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