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How much annual leave (paid vacation) do you get?

How much annual leave (paid vacation) do you get?

Jul 24th, 1999, 09:29 AM
  #1  
KAVEY
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How much annual leave (paid vacation) do you get?

Hi All

On reading another thread I noticed a post from someone, I think in the USA, who mentioned about working your way up to 3 weeks annual leave (paid vacation).

So is this really all you guys get? I was thinking of coming out to the States with my hub for a couple years to work to experience a different way of life, but I am seriously reconsidering.

In the UK the norm seems to be about 20 - 25 days annual leave plus national holidays.

Most jobs being 5 days a week only that means you get 4 - 5 weeks. And you dont have to work up to it.

I understand that French workers get even more, partly due to the strength of workers and the more socialist labour policies.

I also heard that in Australia you get a good number of days and someone was talking about some rule to do with extra payment if you usually do a lot of overtime then ou get extra pay when on annual leave the equivalent of the hours overtime you normally do... I have to assume they were winding me up on that one though...

I am just writing this because I dont know how I would cope on just 3 weeks a year, let alone 2.

Please let me know what your situation is around the world....

Kavey
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 09:45 AM
  #2  
bo_jack
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What you heard about paid vacation in the US is basically correct. The typical large company (I work for one) paid vacation policy is -- 0 days the first year -- 10 days for 1 to 5 (or 7.5 years) -- 15 days for 10-15 years -- 20 days for 20-25 years -- 25 days for 25+ years of service. Sometimes this is negotiable -- but most times is not. In this area of leisure time, the US is woefully behind the rest of the industrialized world. With my company, you also get 7 fixed holidays and 4 "floating" holidays. Currently, I enjoy (and I do mean ENJOY) 25 + 4 + 7 paid off-days; but I have a long time with the same company. Just hiring in, the policy is quite poor.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 09:47 AM
  #3  
bo_jack
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Correction to my previous post: Should have said 20 days for 15-20 years; 25 days for 20+ years.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 10:53 AM
  #4  
Kavey
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Zero days for the first year???

And that is legal?

My gosh, I am almost speechless...

I'll never bemoan my lack ofleave again. (In all the jobs I and any friends have ever had you get at least 20 dyas from when you start. The only limit is that if you start part way through a holiday year then you only get the appropriate percentage of leave, and if you resign, and have taken more than the number of days for teh part of the holiday year which has passed you must work longer notice, pay for them in money or something...

 
Jul 24th, 1999, 11:23 AM
  #5  
wendy
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My company gives us FIVE DAYS vacation for the first year. FIVE DAYS. I recently took a two-week vacation and did not get paid for a single day of it (but on the other hand, at least I got the time off).
However, the employees who work there five years are rewarded with an all-expense paid vacation - one of my co-workers just returned from a two-week vacation to St. Thomas.
Some companies start you off with three weeks - I know Disney does.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 11:49 AM
  #6  
Lori
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What you are hearing is normal for the U.S. We really lack behind everyone in vacation time off. I'm "lucky" in that I work for the state and get 4 weeks but you do not get that until you have been there several years. Most places start with 5 days off after one year and probably the average for most people is 10 days paid off per year. I worked for a very large corporation prior to my current job and also got 4 weeks, but you did not get that until you completed 9 years! Enjoy all your vacation time off and don't complain about not having enough ... I think most Americans, myself included, do wonders with the time they do get off. Many of my friends take time around holidays in order to get a few "extra" days. Frequently, if schedules permit, people can take time without pay but of course that is no where near as enjoyable as paid time off !!! I think the limitd amount of time people have off in the U.S. accounts for the sometimes hectic European schedules you read about on this Forum .. they are trying to pack the maximum into the minimum. Sometimes it works, sometimes not. Incidentally France is pretty liberal when it comes to vacation, but again it depends alot on your job. My husband has family there and they all work for the gov. consequently they get about 6+ weeks paid vac. a year (plus a number of other perks). A store clerk may only get three. Maybe someday the U.S. will get with the rest of the world on this. I believe in Germany, Sweden, etc. people often have 6 wks. paid vac. as well after a very short time on the job.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 12:12 PM
  #7  
bo_jack
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My first response was working from memory. This is quoting directly my company handbook on Employee Benefits:

Continuous Service Vacation
less than 6 months not eligible
6 months 1 week
1 year 2 weeks
5 years 2 1/2 weeks
7 years 3 weeks
15 years 4 weeks
20 years 5 weeks
30 years 6 weeks
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 01:40 PM
  #8  
wes fowler
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Kavey,
Bo-jack's last posting is pretty much on the mark, although you can usually add ten holidays to that figure. One other point regarding vacation time; rarely will a large company allow you to accummulate unused vacation and carry it over for use in the following year. Increasingly, policies are saying "If you don't take it, you lose it!"
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 02:14 PM
  #9  
Dave
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I've been working for a big corporation for about 13 months now. The basic figures are the same as those given above. I get 10 days for the first 5 years (plus holidays), and couldn't take any for the first 6 months.

It's very depressing to be nearly thirty and only get two weeks vacation. Its especially distressing because I came from academia. Do I ever miss those three month summer breaks! Last year I spent three weeks in the UK and three weeks in Turkey. This summer? - a measly 10 days in SE England.

(Guess what? I spent this afternoon printing resumes and cover letters
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 03:39 PM
  #10  
Maira
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I accumulate 6 hours of vacation every two weeks. Not bad. Also, I work 9 hours days to have every other Friday off (I love my Fridays off, specially when Monday is a holiday!).
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 04:32 PM
  #11  
sucker
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THe UPS man that delivers to my office gets 6 weeks a year and is on vacation this weeks. His replacement gets 8 weeks a year.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 06:04 PM
  #12  
dan woodlief
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My company gives ten a year, starting January 1, but by some odd system that I still don't quite understand, you don't get any when you start and don't earn any per month. At six months they give you five days for the rest of the year. When I got the job, I already had a trip to Europe planned, and since I had no vacation yet 4 months after starting, I had to take the leave unpaid. You get 15 days after ten years (this is what I find absolutely horrible, but the company has traditionally had a lot of very long-term employees) and 20 after 20 years. That is the maximum you can ever get. I know I won't likely stay for the 10 years.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 06:05 PM
  #13  
dan woodlief
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My company gives ten a year, starting January 1, but by some odd system that I still don't quite understand, you don't get any when you start and don't earn any per month. At six months they give you five days for the rest of the year. When I got the job, I already had a trip to Europe planned, and since I had no vacation yet 4 months after starting, I had to take the leave unpaid. You get 15 days after ten years (this is what I find absolutely horrible, but the company has traditionally had a lot of very long-term employees) and 20 after 20 years. That is the maximum you can ever get. I know I won't likely stay for the 10 years.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 06:17 PM
  #14  
lynn
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Kavey, I'm 37 years old, live in the U.S., and after working (although not for the same company) for 20 years, it was only two years ago that I was actually ALLOWED to take two consecutive weeks of vacation!

The vacation schedules listed here seem pretty accurate, but in my experience, many U.S. employers are loathe to allow time off because they must ensure that your job duties are performed while you are away. When you are operating on a downsized, skeleton crew, this can be difficult.

Even when we are on vacation, my husband is expected to check into the workplace and perform whatever duties are deemed necessary, no matter how remote the location.

After we were relocated by my husband's company last year, I decided to take a year off, cut way back on every day expenses and do all the traveling I'd dreamed of, but never had the time to do. And we did!! This past year has been one of the best of my life, but I had to LEAVE the workforce to have the time to travel.
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 07:38 PM
  #15  
LYNN
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Kavey -

I have a different story to tell because my husband and I are self-employed. We live in Southern California. I'm a native, he's a transplant.

We have pros and cons. We are lucky in that we take off any time we want. If we see a good deal come up on E-fares, we go if we can. We just did this at 4th of July to Hong Kong. Summer is slow for our business so we didn't miss much by going.

On the other hand, we don't get paid while we are gone. We have to make sure "all our ducks are in a row" before we leave. Generally, I have to pay bills up for 3 weeks in advance to make sure they are covered and I don't get clobbered with them the second I get back.

All in all, I wouldn't trade it for the world. I've worked for others and been an employee with someone hanging over my shoulder telling me what to do and I don't like it. I'd much rather work for myself and take the time off when I can and not take the time off when I can't.

Don't get discouraged about coming here. Like you said, it would only be for a couple of years. Or, set up your own business and then you can take off whenever you want!
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 08:02 PM
  #16  
lisa
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You should all think about coming to 'the lucky country' - Australia. I couldn't believe what I was reading! The norm for all areas of employment in Australia - is 4 working weeks (20 days)per year = 5 days every 3 months. After 7 yrs work, you don't receive any extra leave however, if you leave employment you get a bonus "pro-rata" payment. After ten years of service (some but only a few are 12 yrs)you get what is called 'long service leave' which is equivalent to 13 working weeks or 3 months paid leave. All companies are different regarding the taking of leave, my family is about to undertake a two month trip to Europe - due to my husband's long-service leave which was due four yrs ago, which he didn't want to take then. He presently has approx. 4-6 weeks of unused annual leave avaiable as well, and ofcourse will again be eligible to receive long service leave again in six yrs time. At many government offices after twenty yrs of service your annual leave increased from 4 weeks to 6 weeks. The best job of all probably is the Teaching profession who besides the fourweek break from Dec -Feb, they also get two weeks inbetween the four terms!
 
Jul 24th, 1999, 09:32 PM
  #17  
Seamus
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Kavey, your info is pretty accurate, and Bo_Jack's numbers are pretty standard. Many American companies allow accrual but not using of vacation until completion of 6 months service. Two weeks per annum is fairly standard, with a 3rd after a few years of service. A recent trend in to allow employees to accrue time off only up to the amount accrued annualy - in effect, a "use it or lose it" system. this paid time off is vacation, not sick time, accrual for which varies from 3 to 6 days per year. Some companies use a "paid time off" or PTO system which makes no distinction between time off for vaction, sick, or other reason. In such a situation a junior employee typically accrues about 15 days per year.
Sound pretty horrible? Well, yes - bit salaries do tend to be a bit higher.
 
Jul 25th, 1999, 03:25 AM
  #18  
Valerie
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Since my husband and I travel a lot, we would always have to plan our vacations around paid holidays and weekends. In the New York area, as CPA's for fair sized companies in middle to upper management, we were always only allowed 2 weeks vaction. Two weeks were always used up for one big trip abroad, and the little long weekends in London or Paris or Amsterdam we would have to do during a Fri or Monday holiday. I had always dreamed of having my own business so that I could go away for 3 weeks at a time or even a month and now that I do, I really can't because I am so busy! I have always wished of spending an entire month in France! I wonder what that is like?
 
Jul 25th, 1999, 04:45 AM
  #19  
Anna
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I finally got my 3rd week of vaction this year after 5 years of service with my company. In 10 MORE years, I'll get 4 weeks. At 25 years, we get 5 weeks. I wish the US would think more in terms of how the European countries and Australia
treat their employees when it comes to paid leave.
 
Jul 25th, 1999, 05:04 AM
  #20  
jeff
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Hi Kavey,
I only get 2 weeks of paid vacation per year. I don't think that it's enough, but if I take it all at once at Memorial Day, I get almost 3 weeks. I know that in Europe it's not uncommon to have a month or more vacation. It is not so in the US.
 

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