How hot can it get in late June/July?

Apr 7th, 2004, 05:36 AM
  #1  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 122
How hot can it get in late June/July?

My family (2 adults, 2 kids) is traveling to Italy for the first time in late June/July. We spend two days in Rome, pick up a car and head to a villa outside of Cortona for one week. Then it's off to Lucca for 2 nights, Florence for 3 nights and finally Venice for 3 nights before our flight back home.

My questions:
I have booked lodging in Rome (Fraterna Domus) Lucca (Villa Romantica outside of walls) and in Venice (an apartment Gli Angeli which I read about in a posting!)and at Hotel Casci in Florence. Since we will have a car in Florence and need to park it somewhere while we visit, I am contemplating looking at Villa Agape (monastery up near the hill of Piazzale Michelangelo) which would have parking, be less expensive BUT NO AIR CONDITIONING. Any comments? How toasty can it get and will we need a cool oasis after a day trampsing around the city. Friends were in Florence last July (of course a horrible heat wave) and said it was rough going.

From our base in Lucca we would love to visit the Cinque Terre. Does this seem possible? The kids want to see the tower in Pisa but I have heard it's a time waster and not much to see. Tips?

We have one night open - after leaving Florence and heading to Venice. Any thoughts on a good place to spend one night and visit?

Thanks for any input. I have already used much info I have read in the postings already.





karinw is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 05:47 AM
  #2  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,203
It can get very hot. That's why all the buildings have shutters to keep out the blazing sun and cool things down. Lucca is a great place but the surrounding countryside is fantastic. Some of the best olive oil in Italy comes from the area. The best olive oil I ever had I picked up at a vineyard just north of Lucca in the town of Matraia. If you're into food, you could stop in Bologna on your way to Venice, it's one of the culinary treats. Pisa is really not worth the trip.
buongiorno is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 05:54 AM
  #3  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 606
Let us pray there's not another record-breaking heatwave in Europe this summer. Italy was unbearable in early June last year!
sera is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 06:23 AM
  #4  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 6,098
It's not unusual for temperatures to top 100 F in Florence in the summer. Most Italians make do without A/C, but they also don't spend their time out and about sightseeing in the heat. It really helps to have an A/C room to come back to. The way Florence is positioned in the river valley, it is also prone to higher humidity than much of central Italy.

It's a pleasant drive to Pisa, and we enjoyed seeing the famous Tower, the Duomo, and the Bapistry (get someone to demonstrate the acoustics), but it wouldn't be a huge tragedy to miss it. Pisa is actually a pleasant college town, though the area immediately surrounding the Tower has some junky tourist shops, kiosks, etc.

I'd say that if the kids really want to visit Pisa, it would be worth it.
RufusTFirefly is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 07:02 AM
  #5  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 451
Every summer we have been in italy at that time, it has been VERY hot.
One can survive without A/Cobviously, but it is helpful if you are in the cities.
Out itn the country, it always seems more bearable.

as far as Pisa,
Tke the children!
My kids really wanted to go , so on our first trip there we did a day trip from Rome (via train) and all of us enjoyed it very much.
The buildings are beautiful !
Not just the Torre.
We climbed up to the top of the Bapistry , under the dome, as the Torre wasstill closed to visitors.
The view was exceptional!

there is a reason why some "tourist" spots are "tourist "spots.
Cause they are so wonderful!
nanb is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 08:43 AM
  #6  
rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 13,194
For the ten years of data available on www.weatherbase.com there have been an average of 14.4 days in the month of July above 90 degrees F (in Florence).

Varying data are available for other cities, but the same figure for Rome is quoted as 2. Seems suspect to me.

Just curious - - how hot does it get in July where you live? The geographic center of Italy is about the same latitude as the geographic center of Iowa - - Italy has more extremes in the summer due to its greater variety in altitude, but you will probably encounter summer weather similar to Iowa, since you are not going very far south, nor into the mountains.

Best wishes,

Rex
rex is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 09:06 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 57,890
Iwould assume you will see temps in the high 90s - if not 100 - although probably not for your entire trip. Would not reco staying anyplace without AC.
nytraveler is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 01:13 PM
  #8  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 6,098
Those temps are correct-Florence is a hot spot compared to Rome.
RufusTFirefly is offline  
Apr 7th, 2004, 01:34 PM
  #9  
Original Poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 122
I live in RI and it can get very hot and humid in July. Having traveled to India and South East Asia with our kids (Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand & Bali) I know what it can be like touring around all day and being able to come back to an air conditioned hotel. Traveling in Asia has been much less expensive so we had pretty palatial hotels. This trip to Italy is a bit more expensive all around so our hotel picks aren't so nice though I think we'll do fine.

Does anyone know anything about Villa Agape? I guess I won't really consider it without A/C but I was suprised I couldn't find anything posted about it. What about Cinque Terre? Can do from Lucca?

Also, I read about the Grotto of Pan at the Villa Reale east of Lucca which sounds interesting - hidden garden rooms with a "green theatre" everything made of box and yew hedges.

karinw is offline  
Apr 21st, 2004, 08:23 AM
  #10  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 13
Just want to echo some of the other comments regarding Pisa -it IS worth a trip. We've stayed there twice and are looking forward to visiting it again with our son who wants to see the Tower next month. We found Pisa to be a 'real' Italy city and once you move away from the Campo di Miracoli (the aptly named Field of Miracles) there are not many tourists but nice walks along the Arno and quiet piazzas and some good shops.
When in Lucca you can hire bikes and ride along the city's walls or out into the countryside which your children would probably enjoy, depending on their ages.
Regarding your free night - how about Bologna? We're going there this time and really looking forward to it. Not on the tourist trail but with a fab medieval centre.
Mairead04 is offline  
Nov 1st, 2004, 09:47 AM
  #11  
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 5
We stayed in the Villa Agape in mid October. The external temperature was between 75-80 during the day, but the villa was very comfortable. I don't know how it would be in the summer.

The villa was wonderful. I wouldn't recommend it if you mind walking -- it's a 10 minute walk to the nearest bus stop and about a 30 minute walk into town. A taxi ride was about 6-7 euro. We really appreciated being able to leave the noise, pollution, and traffic of Florence and retreat to quiet, beautiful surroundings.

Our room was about average size by European standards, but the bed was comfortable (not always the case in monasteries and convents!), the furninshings attractive, and there were numerous lovely common areas for visiting. The entire villa is surrounded by formal gardens. The rates were around 50 Euro per night, or 72 if you ate breakfast and dinner. Breakfast consisted of bread, butter, jam and coffee or tea--no variety but we were able to get sufficient coffee each morning. It was served between 8-8:30 each morning.

Dinner was a different story. We found the food to be tasty and filling. First course was a pasta or risotto and bread, followed by a green salad and vegetable appetizers (olives, grilled eggplant, etc.). The main course included a meat and several vegetables, then dessert. Water and a bottle of wine were also provided. After a long day of sightseeing, we were happy to eat at the convent and then retire to bed -- usually before the curfew (10:30, I think).

I have good memories of the Villa Agape and would definitely recommend it.
nandrews is offline  
Nov 2nd, 2004, 12:09 AM
  #12  
Melissajoy
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
We enjoyed pleasant weather in Italy during the last 2 weeks in June 2004. We were in Rome, Amalfi coast, Venice, and Florence, and Siena. I wore capri pants, short-sleeved shirts, and either sandals or walking shoes (athletic shoes) every day.

The only time I felt unbearably hot was on the public bus in Rome. It wasn't air-conditioned and the open windows didn't provide sufficient ventilation.

I was worried about the weather too, as I'm from San Diego were we have great weather. But we were fine in Italy.

It all depends on your luck...I hear that in June 2003 Italy had a record high for summer heat...But in the last 2 weeks of June 2004 we were comfortable in Italy.

Good luck!

Some of our hotels had air conditioning but we didn't always use it. We often preferred throwing open the shutters and enjoying the view. It wasn't that hot.
 
Nov 2nd, 2004, 02:05 AM
  #13  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 17,196
I can't stand hot weather. As far as I'm concerned, an English November is just about perfect, and I LOVE Milanese winters. I hate California because there aren't enough clouds or d``amp.

But I don't think I've ever felt the lack of air conditioning in the Italian countryside. While urban buildings without a/c are hell in the summer, most rural villas and palazzi have been designed around the problem - not just with shutters, but with windows positioned to get draughts (no Feng Shui nonsense), well-chosen surfaces (no carpets, and usually tons of cooling marble), and lots of long corridors.

If the villa's up a hill, it'll be even cooler. Today's (and recent Italians) have retained a lot of the Romans' know-how about dealing with summers. People were enjoying summers in the Tuscan countryside centuries before a/c was invented. And whining about the oppressive heat in the towns
flanneruk is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
chosebinne
Europe
12
Jan 7th, 2018 06:58 AM
ctinsle
Europe
17
Jan 7th, 2011 11:52 PM
oasisboston
Europe
13
Jul 1st, 2008 04:11 PM
carlata
Europe
34
Dec 3rd, 2003 05:17 PM
Ben San Jose
Europe
4
Apr 5th, 2002 04:24 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:05 AM.