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How do you wish the US were more like Europe?

How do you wish the US were more like Europe?

Aug 9th, 2001, 11:29 AM
  #41  
Doug
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Any place you go when you're on vacation is gonna be romanticized in your mind's eye. It always seems sunnier, nicer, friendlier when I'm off on holiday. Hell, even NYC seems like a cool place when I go as a tourist rather than for work.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 11:40 AM
  #42  
Mom
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More time off for birth of a new baby.
Currently only 12 weeks, unpaid.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 12:39 PM
  #43  
Roger
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1) A better railroad system for personal travel at a decent price.
2) More leisurely dining.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 12:50 PM
  #44  
Roger
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Yikes, saw the typical dispute on the health care. The chief reason for the slight disparity of life expectency when USA is compared with Europe-- we have a larger Third World population by far than any European country. Get it through your noggins. And I mean indigenous Third Worlders and those who have swarmed the Rio Grande for the past 30 years.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 12:57 PM
  #45  
laura
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Geez Laura(ahem myself), quote"I don't see a country more family-oriented than the US"...You have not been to a LOT of different countries yet have you?? Or shall I say really experience how to live in a certain country to make those comments. You probably have just touched the surface of a city, town or village when you go on one of your European trips!!! Have you seen the closeness of a Chinese family? or Japanese? or Spanish? or even French?? Have you seen how they all gather around to the family house when everybody drives down from Paris or Madrid or Tokyo to have sunday lunch; have you noticed how the grandparents are being taken care of family members when they are old and not push to an assisted-living facility?? have you seen how an Indian matriarch just cooks for her children, married or not and brings the food over to their house without a bid deal? and on and on and on. So don't EVER make a statement that the US is more family-oriented than any other country, European or not, without delving into their social and cultural aspect first! !Get that!!

Now I expect a tirade from you, AS USUAL.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 01:04 PM
  #46  
Laura
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Um...that was not me in the last post with my name....

And whoever you are that posted that...please read a little more closely....I never said the U.S. was MORE family-oriented than other countries...only that we are at least as family-oriented as other countries are. A mom is a mom and a dad is a dad the world over.

I don't think you really want to know the countries I have been in, but you are wrong about that, too.

Gee whiz....I do my best to not make generalizations (except, of course, the above one about parents being parents)...but you have to do your part, too, and read what someone has to say a little better.

 
Aug 9th, 2001, 01:08 PM
  #47  
mark
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Surban sprawl does exist in Europe - in fact there are suburbs outtside Paris that are as bleak as some of the wards in Newark, NJ. I do believe that there are tighter restrictions on development in Europe because there is so little land available. While some real estate developers would decry tighter development restriction ( READ: less money in their pocket), strict guidelines have been found to be in the long run, more beneficial to the area and creates a more sustainable economy.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 01:16 PM
  #48  
mark
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One other note:

Did anybody else find it ludicrous that the morons in DC voted down a bill making the auto industry produce more fuel efficient SUVs but passed a bill allowing drilling in Alaska?


 
Aug 9th, 2001, 01:23 PM
  #49  
not a laura fan too
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Laura:

YES you do make generalizations (and not only about parents). Please re-read all you have posted so far!!
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 01:36 PM
  #50  
Capo
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Mark, yes I find that ludicrous too.

Of course, on the other hand, this is America, where many people feel it is our God-given right to burn as much gasoline as we want.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 01:37 PM
  #51  
Happy Medium?
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As for being family orientated in the U.S., I don't think it is meant that the family's themselves are not orientated towards family, but there can always be exceptions & those exceptions can cover large amounts of people. But from my perception it seems to be that a part of the business community has created an atmosphere where business/work/job must almost always come first before family, & that comes from pressure (sometimes subtle & sometimes not so subtle) from various bosses/managers/co-workers, to never miss work for sick kids, personal illness, vacations, doctor visits, etc, even though the sick/vacation time is very much available. Or you don't make yourself available for every bit of overtime, even though, throughout the year I work as much overtime & on-call time as everybody else, the facts are in the records. But because I have kids that need to be tended to EVERY day, until the kids get older, & I try to keep that obligation to family, that is looked upon by the business community as a negative, even though the work gets done & the hours get put in. I know this from personal experience for myself & other people I know. That can put alot of stress on families & work related things. I know I will take flack for this, but single workers & married workers without children, while having their own types of stress, may not understand this type of pressure from a place of employment.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 02:22 PM
  #52  
Escritora
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What a lot of very interesting responses! So many thoughts from working parents about how obligations to work require them to sacrifice obligations to family. Makes for quite a juxtaposition with all those who insisted that a husband would be selfish not to take on child care solo for 2 weeks while his wife visited Europe with her parents. The consensus here seems to be that our employers would make that nearly impossible. As for the man whose wife has breast cancer: I actually know a woman who was the most-tenured person in her position at her company, where she'd worked for nearly a dozen years. She got breast cancer and on the day of her first chemo treatment was laid off in absentia (part of a 20% workforce reduction) and not even informed until she arrived at the office the next day to find herself locked out. A New Yorker and lifelong non-driver, I'm appalled by the SUV standards and the Alaskan drilling, yes.

What galls me is the way we squander the incredible resources we have in this country. There's always been poverty and hunger in the world, yes, but there's just no reason for there to be so much of it here. We have such wealth, and yet we're OK with allowing more and more to go into fewer and fewer hands while an obscenely high percentage of our children go to be hungry each night. That our "values" permit this is what disturbs me most about the US.

Finally, Bush's taking a month-long vacation that his big business cronies never would allow for the likes of us is ironic, sure, but only until you consider how much more essential you are to your organization than Bush is to his. President Cheney is, after all, still in DC and at the helm!
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 02:23 PM
  #53  
Steve Mueller
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One of the "God-given" rights that does exist in the US is free speech, which includes bitching and complaining about next-to-nothing. Some Europeans may be foolish enough to believe that the world is going to end because atmospheric carbon dioxide levels increase from 270 parts per million to 310 parts per million, but most Americans have better sense. And anyone that tries to base a case that the US is the evil empire on the fact that we serve larger portions in restaurants is an unmitigated nutcase.

The notion that the US is more materialistic than Europe is absurd. If you want to see wanton materialism, visit a fashion show in Paris or Milan. You will see endless examples of clothes and shoes that serve no useful purpose, other than to demonstrate the wealth of the wearer. One person in this thread complains about how conscience Americans are about their appearance, while another person complains about how we are a nation of sweatshirt-wearing slobs.

Some Europeans will always be critical of the US regardless of what we do because the fact is that American success has progressively marginalized the European continent. It is difficult for them to say a kind word about something that damages their pride so deeply.

Concerning the US health care system, Europeans (as well as the rest of the world) should be grateful that it does not conform to the socialist model. Only the American health care system is dynamic and comprehensive enough to produce advancements in diagnostic and theraputic technologies. Does anyone seriously believe that the first successful treatment protocol for HIV, or the new generation of cancer drugs, could have arisen from the stagnant mess that Europeans call health care?
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 02:27 PM
  #54  
Roger
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...and, Capo, I guess it is the God-given rights of Americans to abort(aka. kill) 1.4 million unborn children every year. I think liberals did a lot of good in this country... until they embraced the wickedness of the butchery of the unborn in the 1970s.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 03:05 PM
  #55  
Capo
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Roger, since this thread is comparing the U.S. to Europe, what's your point?

My point with my "God-given right to burn as much gasoline as we [Americans] want" comment, is that Europeans do not buy gas-guzzling behemoths to the great extent that Americans do. (Perhaps they would if their gasoline prices were lower, but I tend to doubt it.)

Anyway, are you suggesting, with your comment, that countries in Europe do not have legalized abortion? If so, you might want to check out this website, Abortion legislation in Europe.

http://www.ippf.org/regions/europe/c...egislation.htm
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 03:17 PM
  #56  
TooMuch
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Laura:

I think I am capable of determining how many questions were asked in the beginning of the post! As far as my "having lunch" is concerned, it will take a lot more than an American Big Mac to keep me from being cranky. I'm fed up with the inability of posters on this forum to discuss a subject (supposedly on travel related issues) without getting political and/or fanatical. We are now getting into the pros and cons of abortion.

Lady, don't tell me to have lunch; I think you're out to lunch if you can't see what has happened here!!
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 03:18 PM
  #57  
z
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You have to admire how the Italians handled the idiot protesters in Milan. Shoot 'em then run over 'em.

Why can't we do that here?
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 03:27 PM
  #58  
TooMuch
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Hi Z:

Any relation to Laura or Ryan?
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 03:57 PM
  #59  
anon
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I have you in my cross hairs Z and my foot is on the pedal - prepare to kiss my car grill.
 
Aug 9th, 2001, 04:38 PM
  #60  
oldandseensome
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My parents came from Europe to the USA because of the EXTREME POVERTY. No chance at school at all for them or for their children. Inscribed into armies to fight their cousins on the other side of the mountain. None of my elderly relatives from either side would even go back to visit. AND you want "wider political" venues. And ironically this "exciting difference" comes from the same kind of thinking that has caused acceptance of a rigid "political correctness" policy- that is not about easing cultural differences at all but about getting your own way politically and economically with the most media attention to grease your squeaky wheel.

And as far as "perceived undesirables" on public transportation, I wish you could have stepped up into the bus with me in Chicago during the '60's when I had my face sliced with a razor and bled all over my good girl Catholic school uniform- and why because I was there and I was white. Read your wonderful "more urban" crime statistics. I love the suburbs and love my "sprawl." They are a wonderful place to raise kids without the terror and injuries I have lived through. European cities also have their crime rates and big city corruption.

Europe holds some cultural realities like the vacation time and walking / small town lifestyle that are to be admired. But don't tell me how kid friendly they are! Why do you think their birth rates are so low if that is the case. My Italian relatives thought I was nuts to have so many kids. I've raised 6 and have 10 grandchildren. Ryan and Laura are right and said it better than I. My girlfriend has just become a 3 year survivor of a very bad breast cancer. The drugs that she got in chemo are a pure development of capitalism. Socialism and Communism are not successful economic systems over time because initiative and inventiveness are not developed and rewarded.

We could learn from Europe in a couple of ways that are mainly in attitude. You don't need to look/ dress/ act like everyone else. You don't need to own so much and it doesn't have to be new. You can have pride in doing the street sweeper job if you are good at it. But please, not their politics- ever.
 

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