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How do you pronounce "Leicester" as in Leicester Square, from the song "long way to Tipperary" ?????

How do you pronounce "Leicester" as in Leicester Square, from the song "long way to Tipperary" ?????

Old Aug 11th, 2010, 09:45 AM
  #101  
 
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In the Elephant and Castle nowadays there is this statue:

http://srv-londonimages-1.londontown...44_429long.jpg

But hurry - it's being knocked down soon.....
Cholmondley_Warner is offline  
Old Aug 11th, 2010, 10:21 AM
  #102  
 
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>>Tsk Tsk

"...James and I were trying to interest..."
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Old Aug 13th, 2010, 08:23 PM
  #103  
 
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THe key is thr USAGE - you need to look back at writings of the time etc.

everyone is familiar with the concept of an elephant and Castle - it's in chess and war etc etc.......the use for that area I contend is a deliberate misuse of the expression by the locals because of the presence of the "Infanta".

"Charring Cross whilst not so humorous is another example of mispronunciation of a "foreign" phrase.


English is a very informal, organic language and the way that words come in and out of use can be surprisingly informal.

In Warwick for a short while the leading philately company "Warwick & Warwick"set up their HQ in the high street - their address was therefore Warwick & Warwick in Warwick High st, Warwick - a case of the company following the destination.

They actually didn't last long there - which just goes to show that "philately will get you nowhere"
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 01:08 AM
  #104  
 
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>>the use for that area I contend is a deliberate misuse of the expression by the locals because of the presence of the "Infanta".usage doesn't have any particular relatonship to the Infanta. Earliest instances relate to a public house called the "Elephant and Castle" in the mid-eighteenth century, about 150 years after the very temporary visit of the King of Spain's daughter.

>>Charring Cross whilst not so humorous is another example of mispronunciation of a "foreign" phrase.
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 02:32 AM
  #105  
 
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If you ever fancy a giggle get a jock to say "Charing Cross".

They can't.
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 02:36 AM
  #106  
 
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"If you ever fancy a giggle get a jock to say "Charing Cross".

They can't."

really? There's one in Glasgow an all......
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 03:04 AM
  #107  
 
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And they say it all wrong.

The bestest jock thing is to get them to say "banana".

It's the funniest thing ever ever ever.
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 03:10 AM
  #108  
 
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Well the Glasgow Charing Cross, they say right, but the London one, they say wrong.....
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 03:14 AM
  #109  
 
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Banana. Honestly - try it.
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 03:17 AM
  #110  
 
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Think I've lived here too long to notice!
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 04:14 AM
  #111  
 
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Banana.

It is a source of endless hilarity.
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Old Aug 14th, 2010, 05:15 AM
  #112  
 
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Especially when they are boots on Billy Connolly's feet.....said boots are in the People's Palace
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Old Aug 31st, 2010, 08:40 PM
  #113  
 
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It occurs i several places because it was a chain of memorials erected up and down the country in memory of "My dear queen" "Chere reine" - local French of the monarchy at the time.

IO still think that although the pub/inn and expression predate, that the name comes from the vernacular usage.

Finding something "earlier" doesn't necessarily indicate the commencement of usage and I'm not even sure your dates are right - however I'm buggered if I'm going to chase that up. I did so about 25 years ago whilst living in London. i know thinking can change but unless you have a quick reference I think I'm going to let that one lie.
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Old Aug 31st, 2010, 08:42 PM
  #114  
 
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BTW - as Castille means castle - you ae only changing one word - and of course it would have started as a verbal tradition.
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Old Sep 1st, 2010, 02:31 AM
  #115  
 
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>>It occurs i several places because it was a chain of memorials erected up and down the country in memory of "My dear queen" "Chere reine" - local French of the monarchy at the time.
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