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How did you find the passion for travelling? ravel?

How did you find the passion for travelling? ravel?

Old May 11th, 2001, 05:30 PM
  #1  
adeleh
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How did you find the passion for travelling? ravel?

I would love to know what has made you guys love travelling this much? how can we inspire our children to want to explore and enjoy the world? I think the fact that I have come to a different country to live my life has made me appreciate new places. How is it that some people don't have any desire to go beyond Florida?
 
Old May 11th, 2001, 05:51 PM
  #2  
Jim Rosenberg
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Actually, it was our daughter that got US to travel with passion. When she was 10 years old, she came home from school and announced "I'm going to France next year!" Up to that point, we had done some of the more traditional, domestic, spring-break-type travel, but nothing like that. Of course, we all had a lot to learn and the more we learned, the more captivated in the student exchange program we became. After the exchange, we all went to meet the family in France. Then they all came to the U.S. Our travels branched out further as we gained confidence and competence. We met more people, made friends, had exciting new experiences in different places -- and the rest, as they say, is history. As for the second part of your question about other people, that is a difficult question to answer. There were a couple of dozen other families involved in the exchange program on our end and sometimes, I read the French letters for them from their respective families (part of this experience for me was the need to learn French, a very difficult, but satisfying experience that will never be completed...). In those letters, people were obviously reaching out and the opportunity for new experiences and relationships was clearly there; the doors were open. So far as we know, nobody else walked through those doors or got caught up in a continuing experience the way we did. Different priorities. C'est la vie.
 
Old May 11th, 2001, 07:21 PM
  #3  
JOdy
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Lovely post, Jim. We allshould have children like yours!
 
Old May 11th, 2001, 07:56 PM
  #4  
Audrey
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Two things:

First, all my life I grew up hearing stories about all the places that my Grandma had gone when she was growing up in Europe. She introduced me to classical music, exotic food, opera and dance, and a way of life that was different and exciting.

Second, studing art history in college. I am facinated by art and history and this naturally grew into a PASSIONATE love of travel. To see the things that I have studied, and to have some idea of the history behind them, is something I will never grow tired of.
Audrey
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 01:48 AM
  #5  
Melissa
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I'm not writing for me, but for my niece. She had lived a very sheltered life, and despite being a valedictorian, did not want to try new things or learn about the world around her. She had a travel stipend as part of her scholarship, which she was willing to throw away because she didn't want to go anywhere. Well, we DRAGGED her to Europe last year.

We went to Munich, where she learned that Germans are NICE friendly people; we went to Austria, where she saw incredible scenery; we went to Venice, so she could learn some history; and we went to Paris, where she could take in one of the world's most beautiful cities.

Miss Picky Eater was flexible enough to try anchovies, German sausage, deer meat, and all kinds of wonderful Venitian chichetti off the beaten path. She loved it! I was so proud of her! She came home very excited about world travel and happy to have discovered Europe. She's going to Japan this summer, and now we are talking about Spain next year.

Sniff, sniff! Our baby is growing up!
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 02:21 AM
  #6  
Philip
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I hear a lot of stories from people who had traveled extensively. They made the places sound like so much fun that I began making a list of all the places I wanted to go.

I think there are a lot of people that would like to travel more, but are scared to do it, they think about what "may" happen to them rather than the fun they will have. And some people are just happy sleeping in their own bed.

Adeleh, please encourage your children to learn a foreign language or two. I know it's a bummer when you are a kid but I wish I had taken it more seriously. Helping them to learn a foreign language stimulates their imagination to go and actually use the language one day.
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 02:41 AM
  #7  
mari
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i like this thought-provoking post! in my case, my mother was a teacher, so every summer my father would coordinate his vacation time and the whole family went somewhere--to other islands at first (grew up in hawaii), then california, east coast. as a teenager i spent several summer homestays in japan, and ended up in tokyo as a journalist after college. believe me, expat journalists travel A LOT. no second thots about getting on a plane and heading for destinations unknown. since then, i've lived in honolulu and saigon and traveled extensively in asia, europe, u.s., picking up ability in jpnese, vnese and some french along the way. each language opens more of the world to me and erases fears of trying out thai, italian, or whatever's spoken wherever i happen to be. hope i never lose the travel bug. my advice: get ur kids out there!
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 06:38 AM
  #8  
Angel
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I got it from my parents. That's all we did is travel, a "big" trip at least every other year. Now I'm going to Italy in 11 days, and have to leave them behind But someday, I will repay them for everything, and take them with me when I return. (And I *will* go back, I'm already sure!)
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 07:11 AM
  #9  
Ann
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I cannot imagine life without travel. Almost 50 years ago my mother took her two small daughters, one a baby of 6 months, to join her husband working in Africa. That started a nomadic type of life which has instilled in me a love of somewhere new - new experiences, new cultures. I can't get enough of it.
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 07:12 AM
  #10  
Maira
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My father was a U.S. Army veteran that travelled to Germany and other places in Europe thanks to Uncle Sam. While growing up with my brothers and sister in a small coastal town in Puerto Rico, we used to loved to listened to him telling stories about the places he had seen and the people he had met. That is where I found my passion for traveling. He encouraged us kids to get an education, so one day we travel and see the world on our own. To me, joy of travel is one way to still connect with my father, who just recently passed away.
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 07:53 AM
  #11  
Betsy
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I didn't grow up wealthy or anything. But! No matter what, every summer my family took a 2 week vacation to somewhere, even if it was only 100 miles away. I now realize, we went whereever we could afford.
My dad is also the reason I love to travel. Growing up atlas's and travel shows were always around. SO to discover new places was an exciting adventure, not something to be afraid of.
My parents have more money now and can afford to travel abroad. They are in Paris this week. They travel all of the time and so do I. Travel is a connection we all ahare and is one thing all of us can talk about at any time.
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 07:53 AM
  #12  
Jeanette
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I certainly didn't get it from any of my family. My family going back two generations on either side were people who worked day and night- literally. The work and responsibility ethic were so high that everything else was totally secondary. I love them but don't love the philosophy. My children are split and some travel and some do not, although I sacrificed hugely to get them the most "views" that I could.

My desire came over time and from lots of reading. When I was about 8 or 9, I was already reading lots of historical fiction and wanting to see the places I have read about eventually secured the desire. But the real love came only after I had gotten in some big trips in reality. Those first few trips out of the USA didn't happen until I was almost 40, as responsibility for other things was much greater. But be inspired that regardless of some severe health problems, it might never be too late to feed the passion. My mother's friend is almost 80 and has had 4 years of system failures and pancreatic cancer to deal with and is, as I type this, checking herself out of the hospital again to get on a plane.
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 07:57 AM
  #13  
Kathleen
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We have always loved traveling, and done it despite limited funds and time, and small children. The trick is to realize the boundaries of the age group you are with, and plan accordingly. If you have teenagers, plan on stopping at EVERY ice cream place, or providing snacks. Don't stretch their attention spans by endless museum trips, let them sleep in while you do the morning errands, and let them own part of the trip. We spent hours in Sarlat looking for a basketball so that my budding star could have a chance to show off HIS specialty after watching little locals play soccer at a level my son could only dream of. Now my kids are in college, and imagine, Art HIstory is "easy" because even though at the time it seemed that all he looked at were playing cards, he has "seen them all, they are like old friends".

But, no matter where they travel, Oregon still looks the best to come home to...thankfully
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 11:13 AM
  #14  
Sue
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What a great thread, Adeleh! I think the secret to creating adults who want to travel is to take them on trips when they are children. My family could not afford vacations but I was fortunate enough to be allowed to go on vacation with my friends and their families.

The biggest reason I forego the first 2 wks of my summer vacation as a teacher taking middle school students to Europe is to instill the "travel bug" in them. When kids visit other counties, they go home less egocentric and with a deeper understanding of how fortunate they are to be Americans. Until they see how others live, they can't seem to appreciate what they normally take for granted...their rights, culture, economy...and ice(it always tops the list of things missed most) Also they tell me that history, music, art, etc classes are so cool now b/c they can bring in a picture they took of the "David" or explain how troops landed at Normandy or tell first-hand why the Rosetta Stone is an important link to languages. I think travelers feel closer to history which makes them feel more responsible for the future of the world.
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 11:42 AM
  #15  
Melissa
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I forgot to make a suggestion for young children: Richard Scarry's "Busy, Busy World."
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 11:50 AM
  #16  
natalie
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I think I was born with the love of travel. I was raised in a tiny town and my whole life I couldn't wait to get out & see the world. In adolescence I felt as though the whole world was passing me by as I would watch tv shows of wonderful places to go and people to see. I am so proud of myself today that I go to Europe a few times per year and visit other places around the world. My oldest childhood friend still lives in that tiny town and enjoys it with no desire to experince different cultures and ways of life. I don't understand it! Maybe it's astrology? All I know is that travel is my true passion in life! Great post!
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 12:27 PM
  #17  
Leilani
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I grew up near cosmopolitan cities -- Honolulu, San Francisco, Washington, D.C. -- and as a child met people from different parts of Europe and Asia, which made me curious about those places. My dad put up a map of the world on my bedroom wall, and we had an ongoing competition to see who could remember more capital cities.

When I was in high school, I was active in the American Field Service, which sponsors exchange students; their motto is "Walk Together, Talk Together." Through that organization, I met wonderful teens from all over the world, and talking to them whetted my appetite for travel.

My advice is: give your children a global perspective. Read them books about other countries, teach them songs in other languages, give them the opportunity to talk to people from other cultures. Let them know that there's a big, exciting world out there, and they'll look forward to exploring it for themselves.
 
Old May 12th, 2001, 12:40 PM
  #18  
Art
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A girl made me do it. When I was in school, I meg a girl in Cape Cod in the summer. She had just graduated and was starting a job in DC in the fall. I visited her several times and while visited many of the sites in the area. Shortly after I was asked by Uncle Sam to travel the world and ended up in Germany. Things were so close there that I started taking weekend trips. I met a young German woman to whom I became engaged. She was originally from East Germany and had escaped and was interested in seeing places that she had had no chance to do from Libsich. We went to Paris, the Netherlands and I was hooked. After returning to the states and having a son, we started traveling the states and have been in 47 of them. Could not really afford to go to Europe during that time. The last 4 years now Iíve been returning to Europe, and as many of you regulars know i am visiting Poland and Romania this year.

 
Old May 14th, 2001, 04:44 AM
  #19  
Bob
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Back in 1972 my wife and I had never even been on a Plane. But we took a trip to the holy land and after that we were hooked. Our first stop was two days in Rome, we didn't want to leave because we hadn't seen it all. After all these years we still haven't seen it all. But that gives us something to look forward to each year.
 
Old May 14th, 2001, 05:12 AM
  #20  
B
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Until July -69 I'd spent most vacations at Norwegian shores or by walking the mountains. Accidentally I watched a TV-program showing two American guys walking on the Moon. "If they can, I can" I thought by myselves. But I decided to pick up some livlier and not so desolated places. Has been fun so far.
B, Oslo
 

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