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How are those very small hair dryers I see at the stores? Looks like their VERY light in weight...

How are those very small hair dryers I see at the stores? Looks like their VERY light in weight...

May 19th, 2000, 10:36 AM
  #1  
Judy
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How are those very small hair dryers I see at the stores? Looks like their VERY light in weight...

I'm considering buying one of those extra light hair dryers such as the one at this web site: http://www.walkabouttravelgear.com/cyclone.htm. Has anyone used these? They're so small and light, but are they powerful enough? It would definitely save space in my suitcase and at only 8 oz, save on weight. (PS: I'm posting at this web site as I feel I'll get a bigger response here). Thanks!

 
May 19th, 2000, 11:01 AM
  #2  
elaine
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Hi Judy,
I'm not sure what country you live in (USA?) but if you are not European and want to spend a little on a new hairdryer, wait until you get to Europe and buy one there so it will work properly. It has been my experience for example that American
heat-making appliances like hairdryers and curling irons do not work well abroad, even if dual-voltage or used with the proper converter. I had one melt on me once, and in most cases they perform in a weakened state at best. By the way, f your hotels provide hair dryers and/or irons, you're ahead of the game, so check with them.
 
May 19th, 2000, 11:17 AM
  #3  
Thyra
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Hi Judy, I would agree with Elaine on this one but I will add this. I have one of those little dryers and a couple of times it's really saved me. They don't do a great job on my hair which is very curly and needs a gale force desert wind to dry properly, however even with the converters you'll need and the trouble they cause if you are hopping from country to country in Europe you may need one or more types of prongs anyway (for example a dryer you buy in London, may not work in Greece). I have been thankful for the little dryer on numerous occasions, frizz and all.
 
May 19th, 2000, 11:19 AM
  #4  
me
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I agree with Elaine. If you're going to Europe, buy one there. I fried my hairdryer on my first trip to Paris and bought one in a hardware store - works great, it's small, and no adapter needed.

I haven't had much luck with the wall-mounted hair dryers in the hotels - a lot of noise for a puff of air.

Also used to lug my clothes iron around (sorry, I have a thing about wrinkles!)and it would work fine with the adapter and then die as soon as I came home and plugged it in. So, last year I bought a small one in Italy and it's terrific.

Still using my own curling iron, but I suspect that will be the next to go!
 
May 19th, 2000, 11:28 AM
  #5  
Lori
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I've used a Conair hair dryer (small one) for years in Europe with a Franzus converter and adapter & I've never had any problems what so ever. I use the converter and adapter with my Conair curling iron as well. This past spring I did buy a hair dryer in London, people on this Forum were starting to make me paranoid about my converter & adapter It cost about $17 at Boots (pharmacy).
 
May 19th, 2000, 11:30 AM
  #6  
Thyra
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If your curling iron does go, as mine did in Dublin last year, they sell..get this, GAS powered curling irons! I couldn't believe it when my husband brought it back to the hotel. It's this curling iron that works by inserting a small tube of butane (sp?)gas and igniting!! And the darn thing works like a charm! I used it throughout the entire trip! Heaven knows where I will ever find the gas refills.
 
May 19th, 2000, 11:31 AM
  #7  
Judy
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Thanks everyone for your information. I'm from the U.S. going to Germany and France in a few months. How are the prices of a hairdryer in Europe? Will they be easy to find? I once took my curling iron to Spain and some places it worked and others it didn't. At that time I had a perm and had to go around with the frizz look. Ugh! Now is shoulder-length and straight. Quite frankly I could towel dry it enough in the a.m. and head out for the day with damp hair. I just liked the idea of an 8-oz product! I will see if the hotels have hair dryers. That would be ideal, but not sure about the budget hotels. And thinking about it, I could just go ahead and buy it and try it out in Europe. It can't hurt to take 2. My hairdryer is dual voltage but heavier.
 
May 19th, 2000, 11:34 AM
  #8  
Monica
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Thyra, I've seen the gas refills everyplace I've seen curling irons (drug stores, K-Mart, Target, etc). I don't know if I'd like the idea of packing butane in my suitcase. Do the airlines Okay it?
 
May 19th, 2000, 01:50 PM
  #9  
Nancy
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Judy, I bought a hairdryer in Berlin a few weeks ago. It's a small 1200 watt and cost about $10 at a large department store.
 
May 19th, 2000, 02:24 PM
  #10  
Thyra
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Monica, you have? Wow, I must not be shopping in the right places. As for taking in on the plane, I carried it in my little "carry-on" Back pack for the return trip so it was x-rayed and no one said anything. It was a very small amount of butane, (all that was left in the original tube) but still, if I was depending on that particular curling iron for a trip, I might call the airline in advance and ask them. Here's a question for everyone, that's along this original thread, anyone got any great suggestions for what to do with wet hair while on a boat that does not have enough electricity to power a hair dryer? I would love any clever input..sisters?
 
May 19th, 2000, 02:53 PM
  #11  
elvira
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If it's long hair, of course braids (French or otherwise), French twist and a bun (I found little "caps" for a bun in Paris - one is pearls, the other black metal mesh with rhinestone studs). I also found in Paris a set of two haircombs with long fingers (about 2 1/2") that grab your hair, then fit together to hold the hair. Snoods work well also.

I haven't used a hairdryer for years; take my word for it, the above are my tried-and-true methods.

For shorter hair, think headbands and barrettes (those headbands with the little scarves attached work really well), and hats (something with a large crown, you can put your hair in pincurls - ask your mother or grandmother about those).
 
May 19th, 2000, 04:20 PM
  #12  
Donna
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I bought one of the small travel blow dryers and returned in because my dual voltage Revlon weighs about the same and doesn't take up much more room. A model with a folding handle saves space. It's better to take a dual voltage model that bother with a converter. The fan on the "compact" model gobbled up my hair, which is not very long. I, too, love the butane curling appliances. My information is that you may take the butane cartridge in the appliance and one extra and that both must be packed in your checked luggage, not carried onto the plane. But, all in all the advice to move heaven and earth to find a hairdresser that can give you the perfect cut for your hair is well taken. I generally add a bit of gel to damp hair, spray it just enough to keep it in place until it dries, then "fluff" it out when it's completely dry. Once in a while, I take the butane curling brush to it if I'm getting dressed up. I don't mind carting a few appliances around, but I hate spending time on my hair when I went to get out there early every day.
 
May 19th, 2000, 07:37 PM
  #13  
diane
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I think the small foldable hair dryers are worthless. I bought one and returned it. The adaptors worked fine for me in England and Switzerland and Germany. I am wondering about Italy and France.
It's tough because you want to look and feel nice. But doing your hair takes time if you don't have easy hair or look good with it pulled back etc.. And some of us have longer hair and don't look good that way.
My way of dealing with it is. Take converters, get a great cut. Wash and style it one day. Live with it the next.
As for wrinkles... Take a small travel iron with steam capability. Try the hotel shower idea... If you're staying for more than a day spend 20 minutes ironing everything you'll need. Send out dirty clothes to the cleaners in the hotel... And then pack less clothes because you are re using them clean... And the idea of pin curls is not all bad--just takes getting used to. GOod Luck... I like the idea of buying a hairdryer etc... there. You can use it the next trip. Also I am buying a fan there for the heat... Many of the places I am staying have no ac.. One of the people taking Italian suggested that obvious hint...
 

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