Historic London Pubs

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Feb 28th, 2006, 08:42 AM
  #21
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THE GRENADIER
18 Wilton Row, Belgrave Square, London SW1
The Grenadier, built in 1812, was once a mess hall for officers of the Duke of Wellington. Their stables were nearby and the "Iron Duke"'s stone mounting block still stands outside the pub. The pub was a favorite watering hole of King George IV. This is one of several supposedly haunted London pubs - the story has an officer being accidentally flogged to death for cheating at cards and his ghost is say to now haunt the pub. A bit of the original pewter bar is still intact and is thought to be the oldest of its kind around. The pub was in the limelight in recent years as a movie prop used in Around the World in 80 Days and several TV shows. Candlelight dining in the dining room.

NEXT: THE RED LION, one of many so-named pubs in the UK - this one is associated with the infamous highwayman Dick Turpin.
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Mar 1st, 2006, 08:58 AM
  #22
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THE RED LION
1 Waverton St London W1
In the heart of the posh Mayfair district a few blocks off Piccadilly St, the Red Lion was once a 1700s farmhouse and in later times was a watering hole of the infamous highway man Dick Turpin, the pub's main claim to fame. It also has a lauded collection of Staffordshire pottery, brassware, post horns, pots, pistols and tongs.
NEXT: THE MARLBOROUGH HEAD, another Mayfair institution.
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Mar 1st, 2006, 09:26 AM
  #23
 
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The Tea Clipper is veryclose to Harrods and would be a great place to pass the time if they didn't want to shop with their spouse!
Cross brompton Road (with back to Harrods) and turn left. Montpelier Street is the first right. There's a Pret on the corner of Brompton and Montpelier and the pub is just past Bonhams Auction house.

PalQ- what about the Holly Bush in Hampstead??
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Mar 1st, 2006, 09:32 AM
  #24
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THE HOLLY BUSH
22 Holly Mount NW3 Hampstead
Telephone: 020 7435 2892

One of the hidden treasures of Hampstead, the building housing the Holly Bush was built in 1643 and when you visit it you'll feel you've taken a step back to a bygone era.

In winter you can snuggle up to the real fire burning in the quaintly named Coffee Bar while in summer there are seats on the street at the front of the pub where you can enjoy our FEW days of warmth.

You can get that rare thing in London - a really decent pint - as well. The resident beers are Benskins and Tetleys and there are always a clutch of guest ales to warm the cockles of a CAMRA fanatics heart. Food is also available for the hungry.

For the cultured, there are regular Tuesday poetry evenings in the back bar. Dr Johnson and Boswell both drank here so the literary connections are strong.

In Victorian times the pub had seven bars but those are now reduced to four one of which was formerly the landlord's living quarters. Bare oak floor boards, ancient wooden furniture and wood and plaster walls give the place its unique atmosphere. This is accentuated by a clientele and staff with a pleasingly welcoming and knowledgeable attitude.
Highledge: Thanks for the reference about the Holly Bush - i just copied the above text from a Hampstead web site and have not been to the pub but it sounds neat - and I love Hampstead.
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Mar 1st, 2006, 09:34 AM
  #25
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highledge - do you know what CAMRA stands for - I assume it has something to do with real ales - Campaign for Real Ales? My guess??
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Mar 2nd, 2006, 08:47 AM
  #26
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THE MARLBOROUGH HEAD
25 North Audley St, Mayfair, London W1

Standing a few yards from the Marble Arch, once a gateway to Buckingham Palace until the arch was moved to its present location in 1843, is most known for its gates depicting St Geroge slaying the dragon - the gates are often acknowledged as the finest examples of their kind in the UK. The Inn's sign depicts John Churchill, the 1st Duke of Marlborough whose heroics in the War of Spanish succession earned him immense popular acclaim. so this pub's historic interest is mainly on the outside - its gates.
NEXT: THE SILVER CROSS - another of London's haunted pubs
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Mar 7th, 2006, 09:22 AM
  #27
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THE SILVER CROSS
33 Whitehall London SW 1

The ancient house that has evolved into the Silver Cross pub was licensed in 1674 to be a tavern. Today this long narrow building is distinguished by its interior wagon vaulting, walls festooned with Tudor Roses and a portrait of a Tudor Maiden above the fireplace - the maiden's ghost is said to still haunt the pub's upper floors!
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Mar 8th, 2006, 08:06 AM
  #28
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THE WITNESS BOX
Tudor St London EC4
The Witness Box, as it name implies, lies close to the Inns of Court and is a favored wateringhole of the legal community - the pub itself is not the attraction but its clientele and the many original newspaper articles of famous trials and prints on the walls depict at times gruesome punishments throughout the ages.
NEXT: THE CARTOONIST
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Mar 9th, 2006, 07:10 AM
  #29
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THE CARTOONIST
London International Press Centre, 76 Shoe Lane, London EC4
The basically modern Cartoonist pub's interest is not in anything historical but more in the hysterical - namely because it houses the largest collection of caricature cartoons in London. It's also the only London pub to change its outside sign every year, selecting a cartoon from the winner of the Cartoonist of the Year competition held in the pub annually.
NEXT: THE QUEENS HEAD; Hammersmith
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Mar 13th, 2006, 10:22 AM
  #30
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THE QUEENS HEAD
Brook Green Hammersmith London W6
The Quens Head pub existed at least as long ago as 1722 when it was called the Maiden Queen's Head - it's one pub to really retain an old world atmoshpere. It's reputed to be one of the haunts of notorious Dick Turpin.
NEXT: THE BULLS HEAD - Chiswick.
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Mar 13th, 2006, 08:52 PM
  #31
 
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How about THE BLACKFRIAR PUB at the North side of the Blackfriars Bridge? a wonderful Arts & Crafts style pub.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 09:40 AM
  #32
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Thanks booklady: i'm not familiar with the pub but according to this web site's comments it has a smashing interior.
Blackfriar, Blackfriars, London - pub details # beerintheevening.comBlackfriar, Blackfriars, London - pub details - beer in the evening - search for pubs, add your own comments and suggestions, generate pub crawls.
www.beerintheevening.com

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Mar 14th, 2006, 09:57 AM
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And . . the Boot and Flogger . . 10-20 Redcross Way . .

Alleged to be the oldest continuously operated pub in London

Great wine selection and good cheese plates

Rich
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Mar 14th, 2006, 10:17 AM
  #34
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Richard - thanks for this reference as sounds really neat and totally unique: I copied below from Southwark web site:

Historic Boot & Flogger under threat
THE UNIQUE status of Southwark's Boot & Flogger wine bar is under threat. At present the the bar in Redcross Way is the only premises in the UK allowed to sell wine without having to apply for a licence.

John Davy trades as a 'Free Vintner' being a Freeman of the Vintners' Company based at Vintners' Hall on the north end of Southwark Bridge and in the City of London. The little known Vintners' privilege covers the Square Mile and three miles beyond the City. Also covered are some towns on the road between London and Dover and London and Berwick. Some port towns such as Sandwich and Weymouth are also included.The bars may not sell beers or spirits.

The Boot & Flogger operates under the special dispensation confirmed by James I in 1611. Indeed The Boot & Flogger claims that the right to sell wine without a licence dates from a charter of 1567 granted by Queen Elizabeth I.

The change is proposed in the white paper on licensing called Time for Reform: Proposals for the Modernisation of our Licensing Laws. A Home Office spokesperson says: "The point of this legislation is to streamline and simplify the over complex laws regarding liquor licensing."

"It is a great shame" says Vintners' Company Clerk Michael Smythe. "It is being done away with for none other than uniformity. It's totally unnecessary"

If legislation is passed John Davy is certain that it would spell the end of the historic wine bar.

The name Boot & Flogger refers to a corking device. The leather boot holds the bottle whilst the wooden flogger 'flogs' in the cork. The Boot & Flogger, just off Southwark Street, is open Mondays to Fridays 11am to 8pm. Regulars and visitors have been eagerly coming forward to sign a petition to be presented to the House of Commons before any legislation is debated.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 10:22 AM
  #35
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A review of the pub i saw on web:

Love this place - big chesterfield sofas, wood panelling, it looks like a traditional gentlemen's club. They serve Champagne in wine glasses - so much cooler than champagne glasses! i'd suggest to anyone who are planning to go - dress up a bit, you'll feel much more comfortable. There are a lot of suited men there. The manager looks like he also runs a tailor's shop in saville row. Food is traditional.boiled scallops with bacon - anyone? great place.
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Mar 14th, 2006, 10:31 AM
  #36
 
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I guess I forgot they did not serve beers or ales . . I was taken there on a business dinner in the mid 80's . . had my first "Cold Game Pie" . . and a glass or two of their Claret. Followed by a plate of Stilton Cheese with a very nice ( and I expect expensive ) glass of Port .

A very comfortable and relaxing dinner.

Rich
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Mar 14th, 2006, 12:57 PM
  #37
 
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PalQ, this is wonderful! One of the reasons I love London are all the things that have not changed. First, I don't go to pubs very much, so have only been to a few. But, on a previous trip to London as a friend and I were near the London Silver Vaults we happened on a pub and stepped in to revive ourselves after hours of looking at silver. I looked at the Silver Vaults map, and I think it was near the Chancery Lane tube stop on Holborn. For me, I felt I had stepped back in time. The pub was dim(it was early afternoon-ish) had private booths, and heaters to stand around. Also had old barrels sitting up on shelves up high. I was awestruck. And as I recall, I think everything was a soft tan color. If you don't know the name, I'll check it out when I'm there in April.
Thanks
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Mar 16th, 2006, 08:20 AM
  #38
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THE BULLS HEAD
Strand-on-the-Green, Chiswick London W4

The Bulls Head pub has existed since at least 1642 and it's thought it could be much older. Oliver Cromwell supposedly held court here - betrayed to Royalist troops by Moll Cutpurse, Cromwell apparently escaped thru a hidden tunnel from the pub to an island in The Thames - the island is now called Oliver's Eyot. The pub has a nice view of the Thames - there is only a footpath in front of it.
NEXT: THE GOAT
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Mar 21st, 2006, 05:43 PM
  #39
 
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Thanks for the info. I'll have to escape through it once. For my trip next month I'll take your list with me, and will pop into one or two.
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Mar 23rd, 2006, 07:07 AM
  #40
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THE GOAT
3 Stafford St London W1
The Goat dates back to the 17th century and stands on the site of Clarendon House, which was later incorporated by Sir Thomas Bond into the now famous Bond Street shopping district. But the Goat remains much the same - Lord Nelson met Lady Hamilton here - during WWI it was a naval officers watering hole but was declared off limits after heavy losses at sea were attributed to careless talk here!
NEXT: THE FRIEND AT HAND
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