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Here is my kids' teacher's version of "What not to Wear in Italy"

Here is my kids' teacher's version of "What not to Wear in Italy"

Feb 9th, 2008, 08:17 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
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I think it is a good way to show your kids to be tolerant, starting with respecting their own teacher. I would just explain that she feels this way but that they can pack jeans just in case. I would not undermine her authority before the trip even starts.

I know I would not take on the responsibility of 80 tourist teens, it would be a nightmare for me and I would be glad someone else took on the task.
SeaUrchin is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 08:32 AM
  #22  
ComfyShoes
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Kend, I seriously doubt you can actually be a "worse mood"

I don't find at least Italian men any better dressed than people I normally deal with (I live in the U.S.). Then again, I am a man who wears jeans may be couple times every month while shoveling snow or doing lawn work so what do I know.
 
Feb 9th, 2008, 08:36 AM
  #23  
MaureenB
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Telling high schoolers not to bring jeans and tennis shoes would mean they (meaning, their parents) would have to go out and buy new clothing for the trip. Just to make it even more expensive! (And they would be wearing new shoes, which is usually a bad idea, too.)
>-
 
Feb 9th, 2008, 11:36 AM
  #24  
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There are two teachers going on the trip-one male, one female. There are also about a dozen adult chaperones. Given that the teachers travel for free (adult chaperones pay full price), I don't think the teachers have real tough duty - one adult per 5 or 6 teens.

And a previous poster is right- I am NOT going to buy a number of paid of dress slacks for two kids who will never wear them again. (The cost of the trip is high enough.)

Of all the what not to wear advice, what not to drink advice, etc., I do think they are making one mis-step. Instead of each chaperone being responsible for the passports of the 5-6 kids in their group, each child is carrying his or her own the whole time. I am much more worried about my child's passport being lost or stolen than I am his or her shoes not fitting in.
missypie is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 12:04 PM
  #25  
 
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Missypie, are these 12 chaperones parents or are they teachers. Believe it or not, the chaperones can be worse or at the very least, useless if they are parents. The kids tend not to ignore other parents on these trips.
"Given that the teachers travel for free" This is not a vacation for teachers. They have an incredible responsibility and if anything goes wrong they are accountable. It is not a vacation for them at all. They will also be away from their homes and their families. Furthermore, they will probably spend many a sleepless night making sure the kids don't sneak out of the hotel or are not drinking alcohol. And dont think just because your kids are in the choir that they wont be tempted to booze it up.
With all do respect, you really sound ungrateful and if I were the teacher, I would not take your child on such a trip considering your attitude.
travelme is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 12:07 PM
  #26  
 
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"The kids tend not to ignore"

Should read kids tend to ignore.
travelme is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 12:19 PM
  #27  
 
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Here's my observation:

In major cities both adults and kids tend to dress with a litle more care. But teens in Italy and France etc do indeed wear jeans and "trainers" . It's universal.

What you won't see are Italian teens dressed like Britney Spears etc: that is, like junior streetwalkers. Not done, not much. American teen girls tend to dress to look about 5-10 years older than the boys their age. (Likewise, teen boys in Italy don't dress like little kids.)

Once you're outside major cities, kids dress more casually, to my eyes.

On this page
http://www.thefashionspot.com/forums...e-31123-4.html
you can stroll down to see the sort of mix you'll see on the streets of Italy (though I admit the many very well-dressed are not included here.)
tomassocroccante is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 12:26 PM
  #28  
 
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First of all, instead of bashing the teacher, why don't you have a one on one sit down and try to explain to the teacher with all your wordly travel knowledge that you impart, that in this day she just might have it wrong and give her reasons why. If that doesn't work, maybe you should go to a higher up, like the Principal of the school and try to impart some wisdom there. Hey, maybe the Principal is also a world traveler and knows what is good to wear. Travelme has a very, very good point. Instead of bashing the teacher, you should be thanking the teacher for organizing this once in a lifetime opportunity for many of the students going on this trip. As to the fact that the teacher is getting a free trip and they don't have a real tough duty is a terrible thing for you to say. Those teachers are the ultimate people responsible for 80 students that are in their care. They will do, and have enough things on their plate the whole trip 24/7 that they EARN that free trip. If a child has to be taken to the hospital at night, they will be doing it and staying there with them. If a child looses their passport, they will be the one's the child runs to and the teacher will have to deal with it and all the other problems that may potentially arrive. As a former teacher who did chaperone many student trips over 35 years, (including senior class trips from Pennsylvania to Disney World in Florida for a week) I am very upset over your comments that the teachers won't have a rough duty. There have been nights where we were up all night because of a problem and I mean ALL night and then had to continue on the next day with our planned activities. Some trips we only slept about 8 hours in 6 days, because we were very concerned, responsible, chaperones that took our duties very seriously.

Yes, the teacher might be wrong about the clothing issue, but why don't you try to work with her and fix the problem, instead of bashing her here as a lot of you ALWAYS tend to do on this forum.
I'm probably next!
dave
DinPa is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 12:41 PM
  #29  
 
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I don't think missypie's post was to bash this teacher. If she truly thought this woman were incompetent, I doubt her kids would be going on the trip. I think missypie was merely pointing out one piece of poor advice the teacher gave the group.

Further, and I might be wrong, but I don't think missypie was asking for any advice from us as to handle the situation. In the end, what the kids wear is neither a deal breaker nor a serious situation to warrant a long conversation with the teacher and certainly not a conversation with the principal. It's just not that big of a deal.

She and her kids know what to wear, and I'm sure she'll pass along the information to parents she knows well.
lucy_d is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 12:51 PM
  #30  
 
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<nor a serious situation to warrant a long conversation with the teacher> >

As a former teacher, my question is why not??

<and certainly not a conversation with the principal>

Again, why not??

<She and her kids know what to wear, and I'm sure she'll pass along the information to parents she knows well.>

Terrific, a parent who will break the rules, before the trip even starts! Work within the system and try to fix the problem, not become more of a problem.
There is absolutely nothing wrong with talking with the teacher and Principal about resolving any parents concerns. I know I would rather have that than have a parent bashing me behind my back and then decide to do her own rule making and breaking.



DinPa is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 01:12 PM
  #31  
MaureenB
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Missypie, I understand your frustration with the situation, and I didn't take your posting as a 'bash' on the teachers.

One thing I'd try to get changed, though, is the passport control issue. I would definitely rally enough support to convince those people in charge to assign an adult or two to keep all passports. That's the way our kids' high school trips were all handled. Otherwise, it could be a big problem that could affect the whole group's agenda if one passport gets lost.

I haven't read all the posts. Do you get to go along, too? I remember reading your recent trip report to Italy with your kids.
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Feb 9th, 2008, 01:14 PM
  #32  
 
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>>>Terrific, a parent who will break the rules, before the trip even starts! Work within the system and try to fix the problem, not become more of a problem.<<<<

missypie did not indicate that not wearing jeas was a rule. It seemed to be a packing tip, much like advising teen girls not to take all those hair appliances and toiletry items. No one is going to search luggage and confiscate a straighening iron is someone breaks that "rule."

I still think it was a suggestion and certainly not a huge issue. Yes, she could mention in passing to the teacher that she may be off base with the suggestion, but a long conversation with the teacher wouldn't be in order in my opinion because I don't think it's that big of a deal.

As a teacher myself, I would not be pleased if a parent went to the principal because of a wardrobe suggestion. An administrator has a lot more to worry about than whether or not a student wears jeans or khakis while touring Italy. It just makes the parent look like a complainer and a tattle tale.


>>>I know I would rather have that than have a parent bashing me behind my back and then decide to do her own rule making and breaking.<<<

That's not what missypie was doing.
No, I wasn't suggesting that she fire up the troops against the teacher or break any rules. Again, she didn't ask for any advice anyway. It's not like she is going to tell her kid not to wear the performance attire because she disagrees with it or break curfew because she thinks it's too early. She didn't agree with the wardrobe suggestion. Seriously, it's not that big of a deal.
lucy_d is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 02:11 PM
  #33  
 
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Has this teacher any experience in travelling in Italy. I don't think so as her comments reflect a lack of knowledge plain and simple.
Sorry I am with misspie on this one, I am really surprised this teacher actually the kids this information, it IS wrong, so where did she come up with it.

BTW, I think it is silly that the adults can't have wine with dinner, frankly if there is concern about an adult chaperones ability to control their drinking or their behaviour then why are they going?

Also I DO NOT feel sorry for a teacher who VOLUNTEERS to do a trip like this because they are not REQUIRED to , they VOLUNTEER, if its too tough then don't do it.

I also think passport control should be managed by an adult , not to make it easy on the kids, but , easy on the adults, if one child out of 80 mislays their passport one adult with have to deal with the situation , one on one, for days possibly and if it is near travel time they will have to remain in the country with the kid until new passport is issued. Who pays for extra hotel and transportation costs.

bozama is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 02:36 PM
  #34  
 
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Definitely agree with the passport issue. I worked last year for a missions organization that takes 3600 teenagers (we're talking as young as 11 years old here) every year to 27 different countries, and passports and other travel documents were never with the students when not needed. If there are a dozen or so adult chaperones in charge of 5 to 6 students, they should definitely be the one holding on to those docs! Last year, out of the 3600+ students we took, no passports or tickets went amiss.

Compare that to my high school trip where the students were responsible for their own documents to Italy a few years back. Out of forty five students, three of them lost their docs. I'm guessing that was NOT fun for our VP, who had to stay with the three girls for two extra days in Rome trying to get their passports replaced.

As for the jeans and tennis shoes issue, though I can kind of see where the director is going, everyone here is right in saying that two massive tour busses and a horde of teenagers pretty much equates to tourists.

Though as an ex choir kid myself from not too long ago, I'm not going to lie, I sure do hope that the director is worrying more about their repertoire than the students' fashion sense >-.
alecksonajetplane is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 03:34 PM
  #35  
 
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"Also I DO NOT feel sorry for a teacher who VOLUNTEERS to do a trip like this because they are not REQUIRED to , they VOLUNTEER"
Huh? Its not a question of feeling sorry for the teacher. You totally miss the point, Bozama. Its recognizing and more importantly, appreciating what this adult is doing for Missypies children. Most likely the teacher is going over her spring break or some school vacation. I don't know how you can call that a holiday. If that is the case, she is spending vacation time with children. Even if the teacher is paid a stipend, it still is a sacrifice. I am sure that the teacher volunteering to go because she is fully aware of the benefits the children will gain from this experience. It is still very admirable and if I were to send my children, I would be very grateful and appreciative.
travelme is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 03:54 PM
  #36  
 
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bozama wrote: "Also I DO NOT feel sorry for a teacher who VOLUNTEERS to do a trip like this because they are not REQUIRED to , they VOLUNTEER, if its too tough then don't do it."

There is a tone in this thread that I don't like. Two teachers, with the aid of a number of parent chaperones, are taking 80 kids to Italy. One of them makes a questionable call on attire, and cognoscenti on this forum join forces to ridicule them.

After a couple of posts suggesting that the teachers' efforts merit some appreciation, bozama posts the piece I quote above. That's the sort of attitude that discourages people from doing voluntary work.
Padraig is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 04:50 PM
  #37  
 
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<Also I DO NOT feel sorry for a teacher who VOLUNTEERS to do a trip like this because they are not REQUIRED to , they VOLUNTEER, if its too tough then don't do it.>
Not one person mentioned anything about feeling sorry for anyone. Apparently you have never been in a position to be responsible for the safety, welfare, and security of a number of students thousands of miles away from their home and family. It is a daunting task and should be appreciated and not belittled by anyone. No one ever said is was too tough, but they do deserve and earn whatever perk they get. To imply they get a "free trip" is basically being uneducated to the whole process.
DinPa is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 06:50 PM
  #38  
 
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How have they advised the kids to carry their passports?

Are they each getting money belts to wear under their clothes?
suze is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 07:11 PM
  #39  
 
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Actually I am not sure that these are teachers.

Missypie states "Two of my high schoolers are going to Italy next month on a choir trip". She than goes on to explain about what the choir director said regarding the participants clothing.

Perhaps I am wrong but I get the impression this is a church choir group not a high school group. Or perhaps it is a choir group of a religious high school so in fact the choir director is a teacher.

Hopefully missypie can clarify this situation.

LoveItaly is offline  
Feb 9th, 2008, 08:30 PM
  #40  
 
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Oh dear, now I'm more fascinated with the idea of 80 teenagers each being responsible for their own passports for the duration of this trip (than the original topic of jeans and sneakers)!!
suze is offline  

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