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HELP -- Travelling w/Kids ---- Does the milk taste different?

HELP -- Travelling w/Kids ---- Does the milk taste different?

Jun 1st, 2005, 06:40 AM
  #1  
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HELP -- Travelling w/Kids ---- Does the milk taste different?


I tried doing a search on this and didn't find anything so I'm asking all of you helpful people about milk (whole or otherwise) in Italy. I know I didn't like the milk in Britain when I visited as a child. Is Italy similar? I have a 7 yr old who will be fine but a 4 yr old who will need it regularly. I have taken Parmalat milk boxes to other places but we need to travel light to Italy so I don't want to pack those. Any thoughts?
sbrooks is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 06:51 AM
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I don't think I've ever drank plain milk, but maybe you could pack some chocolate milk flavoring, just in case...
Travelnut is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 06:53 AM
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I didn't notice a difference in taste in Italy, however the milk is not kept as cold as we are used to. That is really the only difference I noticed.
TexasAggie is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 06:53 AM
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I found the milk in Italy to be delicious. The whole range is available from whole milk to non-fat; just read the fine print on the box. If you are going to be in Italy only for short vacation, it is unlikely that your child's health will be impaired if he/she doesn't like the taste of the milk and refuses to drink it. I see no need for you to pack milk to take along. Additionally I would suggest that you not indicate to the child that he/she may not like the taste of the milk in Italy, Rather, just assume that he/she will accept it.
Betsy is online now  
Jun 1st, 2005, 07:12 AM
  #5  
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Thanks for the info. Luckily, my son likes his milk just a tad below refrigerator cold. My daughter doesn't but she'll doesn't require milk...it's only 2 wks. As for telling my son, we never planned on cluing him in to any differences....I know that can be a real mistake!! He only drinks milk or water (doesn't like juice) so that was my concern but I feel better now....thanks, again!
sbrooks is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 07:17 AM
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I do remember the milk different as a child as well here in Ireland when we visited but all milk seems to be processed the same way unles ytou get it fresh on a farm straight from the cow! In ireland we seem to have all the varities that are available in america maybe mmarked a bit different. Also some mils have added vitiamins or folic acid. Should not be a problem for you .
SiobhanP is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 07:19 AM
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You will be able to find Parmalat at any grocery store in Italy. This is what I buy while in Italy. As I understand the kids already like this.
zizi is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 07:34 AM
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sbrooks, you DO realise that Parmalat is Italian, don't you? It's from Parma in Italy - parma-latte, get it? You can buy it in shops all over.
Kate is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 07:57 AM
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My two kids frequently say the milk tastes different when we travel and last summer in Italy was no exception. I agree with Betsy that for a short vacation it is not worth stressing over. Try the regular milk when you arrive, purchase some Parmalat if necessary.
sprin2 is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 07:59 AM
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sbrooks & Siobhan : I don't know how old you are, but is it possible that the milk you tasted in Britain/Ireland as children was sterilised as opposed to pasteurised ? It used to be a lot more common - came in taller, thinner bottles with a crown cap as opposed to a foil cap. I didn't like it either. From what I remember it tasted more like UHT milk does now - kind of creamy, but not in a good way.

I don't know if sterilised milk is still made but I think I remember noticing that shops in Italy & France seemed to stock more UHT milk than shops here, so be careful not to buy that by mistake (assuming that's not what you buy at home).
caroline_edinburgh is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 08:01 AM
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Now Kate, do you really think she would have posted her question, if she knew that? I am all for being direct--as I am being here--but I believe one can make a point in a slightly less harsh fashion....
socialworker is online now  
Jun 1st, 2005, 08:32 AM
  #12  
ira
 
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Hi sb,

Since the taste of milk is so dependent on what the cows eat, I'd be surprised if your kids didn't notice a difference.

Try feeding your 4 yr old fresh mozzarella di buffola cheese for breakfast.

ira is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 08:38 AM
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socialworker, didn't mean to sound offensive, I was chuckling kindly. I blame it on the internet. It sounded like friendly ribbing in my head!
Kate is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 08:40 AM
  #14  
ira
 
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Hi kate,

Sometimes one has to put smiley faces.

Type : ) without spaces

ira is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 09:09 AM
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Yes, I have my answers now. I appreciate everyone who tolerated my temporary ignorance and defended me. Kate, I actually laughed at myself when I read your post b/c my sister had just told me that Parmalat was Italian. Well, thanks for your input and I hope you all have a great summer!
sbrooks is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 09:27 AM
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Parmalat milk, when sold in the US, is no more Italian than Kraft "cheese" when sold in Britain or Germany is American.

Parmalat is simply an Italian brand name. The United States, unsurprisingly, imported no milk from Italy last year. But Parmalat uses its brand to market in the US milk that comes from US dairies.

Whether it tastes the same as milk sold under the same brand name in Italy and made in European dairies I'd very much doubt.

But what IS important, I'd have thought, is that if your child is used to fresh milk, he or she is unlikely to tolerate UHT milk, which is what the unwary can easily find themselves buying in most Italian supermarkets.
flanneruk is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 09:34 AM
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OK Kate, now I understand and I am sorry I mistook your kidding for sarcasm. I must admit that I have *also* been the author of things that sounded like ribbing (to me) and came across as sounding not very nice...You are absolutely right about the limits of the internet!! Sometimes tone of voice is everything and on here we are handicapped by not being able to "hear" that joking tone...On a separate note, I wonder how one makes that little winking guy???
socialworker is online now  
Jun 1st, 2005, 09:45 AM
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; ) with no spaces.
Statia is offline  
Jun 1st, 2005, 09:50 AM
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Winking guy is b ( without a space between the b and the (

Here's the URL for all the "smileys."
http://www.fodors.com/forums/smileys/
Betsy is online now  
Jun 1st, 2005, 09:56 AM
  #20  
 
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Oops! Statia's correct....
Betsy is online now  

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