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Heading to Europe for a great food adventure and learning experience!

Heading to Europe for a great food adventure and learning experience!

Old Jul 5th, 2014, 10:44 PM
  #101  
 
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We are talking at cross purposes here ;-)
morcilla is good but as some other ingredients are added (and that varies with the regions in Spain) it is very different in taste.
Cows are not slaughtered by the families here. They are too valuable, either as milkers or to be sold to for meat to the meat market. Actually slaughtering one's own pigs is supposedly outlawed now, unless you have someone "qualified" with a dispatching pistol on hand. The qualified person seems hard to find but the pistol not.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 12:02 AM
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A 'burger' in Germany/Austria certainly isn't what the Anglo world calls a burger.

A Hamburger in German is merely a person or thing that comes from Hamburg.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 03:05 AM
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What is German for hamburger, the edible kind?

Is a Berliner both a doughnut and a person from Berlin or is there another term for people who are Berlin residents or natives? I heard that when JFK stated "Ich bin ein Berliner", he was in fact saying "I am a doughnut."

I know I could look this up but intetested in a German speaker's answer.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 04:51 AM
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Can't stand longer than 3 hours and will be in Europe for 4 months.
I am also wondering what her first language is.

Leaving in a couple of months and knows very little about the logistics of this trip.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:11 AM
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<i>So Bamburger, despite the name, isn't really a burger but named after a place. I have never heard of it. I'll definitely try that. </i>

Yes, it's named after the city of Bamburg.

<i>What is German for hamburger, the edible kind?</i>

Unless all the menus have been lying to me, it is Hamburger.

Now, there is something that kinda looks like a hamburger called a Frikadeller but it DOES NOT taste like a hamburger. It"s a tasty treat but so not a hamburger.

protip: Germany as a whole seems incapable making a decent hamburger. If you get the craving for a hamburger while in Germany, go to Burger King or get the Royal TS from McDonalds. while it's true that a good burger can be found (eventually), it's not worth the effort separating the wheat from the chaff.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:17 AM
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What if it is a different burg in which a burgher who sells burgers?

And if they sell hamburgers in Hamburg what do they sell in Pittsburgh?
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:20 AM
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<i>Is a Berliner both a doughnut and a person from Berlin or is there another term for people who are Berlin residents or natives? I heard that when JFK stated "Ich bin ein Berliner", he was in fact saying "I am a doughnut."</i>

Berliner is someone from Berlin. Ein Berliner is a donut. Note that one lacks the indefinite article. That's the difference.

Ich bin Berliner. = I am a Berliner.
Ich bin ein Berliner. = I am a [Berliner] donut.

Confusing? Hell yeah. I have far too many times said "Ich bin ein Amerikaner" (I am a black and white cookie). The correct way to say it is "Ich bin Amerikaner". Of course, you won't have to say that as they will know from your accent that you ain't from around here.

Also, I am not 100% sure but I think Ein Berliner refers to a certain kind of donut.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:29 AM
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sparkchaser

Thanks for the responses.

Not too interested in eating hamburger in Hamburg or elsewhere in Germany. Will stick with all the wonderful varieties wurst!
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:32 AM
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Man, if JFK said he was a doughnut he could have changed the entire Cold War.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:38 AM
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He did say he was a donut.

I saw a button that was s donut and the donut was saying "Ich bin ein Berliner auch" (I am also a donut).
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:44 AM
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Let's not tell Dunkin.
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Old Jul 6th, 2014, 10:52 AM
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Dunkin Donuts has arrived in Germany. Lines out the door of Germans waiting to get their donuts. It's crazy.
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Old Jul 7th, 2014, 03:30 PM
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Seriously?
Actually a lot of American chained stores that opens in other countries, gets a ton of business.
Like KFC in Asia is booming while in the US, it's not really the first place people would want to go for fast food.
The fast food chains to cater to the specific taste of that country and make their meals like so... so maybe the doughnuts at Dunkin Donuts in Germany are very different from the US.
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Old Jul 7th, 2014, 03:34 PM
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Hi Sparkchaser,
So when I go to Hamburg and want to order an actual hamburger, I just say hamburger ?
If a Frikadeller looks like a hamburger, what's in it that makes it a tasty treat ?
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Old Jul 7th, 2014, 03:40 PM
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Hi Gretchen,
My first language is Mandarin. If you have any questions feel free to ask. I have answers.

I intentionally did not do a great deal in planning this trip because you don't know what will happen when you get there. Anything can happen, but that doesn't mean I'm going into this willy-nilly either.
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Old Jul 7th, 2014, 06:10 PM
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I tried a Dunkin in Madrid and it was the same.
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Old Jul 7th, 2014, 07:30 PM
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That's a shame.

But it's okay, I don't really eat doughnuts anyways.
Taiwan has these doughnuts that are part mochi, it's pretty awesome texture.
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Old Jul 8th, 2014, 02:58 AM
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<<Now, there is something that kinda looks like a hamburger called a Frikadeller but it DOES NOT taste like a hamburger.>> In Nordic countries, frikadeller are meatballs and are served with various garnishes depending on whether it is winter or summer. They are usually made with pork or veal or a mixture of both. They look nothing like a burger and definitely don't taste like one. Leftover frikadeller can be served cold sliced up on rye bread.
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Old Jul 8th, 2014, 10:29 PM
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<i>So when I go to Hamburg and want to order an actual hamburger, I just say hamburger ?</i>

Correct but if it's not on the menu, don't be surprised if you you get a passive aggressive reaction to you silly query. And ask for "eine Hamburger" (a hamburger). If you just ask for "Hamburger", you're asking for a resident of Hamburg but unless the person you are talking to is is being overly pedantic, they will understand you want the tasty grilled meat dish and not a resident of Hamburg.

Has this been beaten to death yet?

<i>If a Frikadeller looks like a hamburger, what's in it that makes it a tasty treat ?</i>

It's also called Fleischküchle. No matter what it it is called, it is ground meat (probably pork with another meat added) and spices and probably onion. It's good but it won't scratch a hamburger itch.

Odin is right about the Nordic versions being round -- German versions are more oval/egg shaped to kinda flat but still rounded.
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Old Aug 10th, 2014, 12:57 AM
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@TheObsessiveBaker:

Seek out bakers and bakeries you'd want to visit or learn from, then, try to get some time in their bakeries, helping out for a few shifts and go there.

Also consider following a group online like Artisan Bread Bakers or Perfect Sourdough: they're on facebook. For instance, there's a legendary sourdough course in Sweden that you could have booked (it's full now, starts august 15th) but you'll only be aware of those if you follow such enthusiasts' groups.

The Dan Leppard book (the hand made loaf) has vignettes on artisan bakers across Europe: you might start your search there.

I do a little bit like you, on holiday, and will go seek out specific bakers. For instance, a few years ago I traveled to Lom, in Norway so that I would be able to visit Morten Schakenda's bakery there.

To be honest, I think you're approaching from the wrong end: what kind of baking is it that you want to do and in what setting? If you want to produce artisanal pastry (or bread), there's no use in seeking out pastry chainstores in Germany for instance.

I think you could narrow down already now what you want to do. From experience I can tell you that a patissier's temperament is completely different from that of a baker. I find it's almost impossible to be both.

It seems to me you're more of a patissier, so that leaves out bakers on your list. Also, try to think ahead a little bit of where you want to go with your product. Everyone and his wife is offering macarons these days, so you might decide to specialize in non-french stuff, like German baking, or Scandinavian "viennese" pastry. That too brings focus to your journeyman schedule. I assume you want to learn how to make certain products too. In that case you'll need more than flying visits.
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