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Gift for my European Friends- How about Hershey?

Gift for my European Friends- How about Hershey?

Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 06:06 AM
  #61  
 
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Have found wonderful eyeglass covers both at MOMA in New York and at the one in Seattle.
I'm sure OP by now never wants to hear the word Hershey again. I'm going to try Kathie's brands for myself...after I lose 5 pounds
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 07:36 AM
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<<I love the US dearly. But your cars are poop, chocolate tastes like cabbage and beer isn't as strong as French mineral water.>>

Three more ignorant opinions are rarely found; combining them together is rarer.

Between the various top confectioners, microbrews and macromicrobrews (like Sam Adams) the foolishness of BritCaicos' claim is self-evident. Considering how the US microbrew revolution has taken root in Europe (because British beer is vastly overrated and no country bordering the Mediterranean has decent beer), reality is contrary to the claims quoted above.

As for the cars, I'm wondering how anyone whose screen name involves BRITISH can criticize the cars of any other country with an automobile industry.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 08:27 AM
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seems like a lot of humourous prejudice is being banded about on all sides.

Still the UK microbrewery explosion started in 1960 so hard to imagine....

Have a great weekend, eat chocolate, and think about peace.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 09:43 AM
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I like Hershey's chocolate much better than anything I've ever had in Europe.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 09:48 AM
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Two other suggestions for interesting local gift items in Chicago:

http://www.museum.state.il.us/ismsit...ndex.html?IAS= (Illinois artisan shop)

http://shop.architecture.org/ (Chicago Architecture Foundation which has nice gift shop)
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 10:15 AM
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How about taking a bottle of California olive oil and having a comparative tasting test with the Spanish stuff ? Fun plus you won't be adding another piece of junk to the stuff they already have.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 01:18 PM
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I *love* good chocolate, but I will occasionally eat a Reese's cup. Those are pretty great, but I understand Europeans don't like peanut butter, so that's not a good suggestion for a gift.

I was surprised at how cheap really, really good chocolate is in Belgium. I found great chocolate at the airport!
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 01:38 PM
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Sorry for the benefit of Big Russ, I rephrase.

Your chocolate tastes like poop, your cars are as inspirational as French mineral water ( Evain ) and your cars are just cabbage.

Just what are you going to put up against a McClaren P1 ? A Dodge Viper ?
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 01:45 PM
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The American dream?

Is to buy a British car.

McLaren
Bentley
Aston Martin
Range Rover
Lotus
Jaguar
Rolls Royce

Main reason most Americans have 2 days holiday a year and work 80 hours a week is so that they don't have to drive Chevrolet.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 02:07 PM
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OK, I guess the chocolate debate has been pretty well covered.

I suggest a small interesting American cookbook, maybe with regional recipes, or something clearly American regional in nature. I've done that and European friends have brought same to me. Usually very interesting, and if nothing else, very pretty photos!

I also like the Chicago (or other) photo book ideas.

no Hersheys, but quite frankly, Hershey's kisses ARE unusual. (and I hate any milk chocolate, though addicted to dark chocolate, usually LIndt)
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 03:06 PM
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And if you are from Chicago don't overlook our hometown brands of Tootsie and Ferrara (lemonheads anyone?) Not that you would bring just that as a gift but I have treated others on my overseas travels from Chicago with an assortment of those explaining they are childhood favorites and it always seems to bring a smile.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 03:18 PM
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Maple syrup in cooking sounds disgusting to me, but I'm sure a lot of people find octopus, anchovies or rabbit disgusting, which I pretty much eat every week.

I live in Italy because I like the food. I cook and eat the same food the locals eat. I don't happen to use cookbooks myself, but were someone to bring me a cookbook -- from anywhere, not just the US -- I would most likely not be able to cook many of the recipes because I wouldn't be able to buy most of the ingredients where I live, or even if I went to the largest city near where I live.

I don't like to throw food away, so usually -- if it's just that I don't like that kind of Belgian chocolate -- I serve to other guests or give it away. Of course I appreciate it when my guests give me anything -- I especially appreciate that my artist friends have sketched where I live or sent me their best photos . Sometimes peope do give me foods that I adore-- but I don't feel obliged to eat high calorie foods like maple syrup, milk chocolate, peanut butter, jelly bellies or Tootsie Rools, etc, and these foods are hard to give away where I live.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 04:01 PM
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Mammoth pecans fresh from Georgia. Toasted, salted, pecans would be even better. Presented in a pretty tin. If I moved to Europe, the only food I would miss would be pecans.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 05:35 PM
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Caicos, we make damn good cars here in America. You ever hear of Toyota?

Oh, and if you are ever in Colorado, I'll change your mind about American beers in short order. I live just down the road from a Budweiser brewery. No kidding.
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Old Apr 2nd, 2015, 09:59 PM
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Toyota ?

Aren't they from those islands off your West Coast. About 5000 miles off shore. Mmmmmm....
Thought they were built in Washington ......Tyne and Wear, UK.

Bud.

i can't afford the stuff, I need a mortgage to get drunk from it . Usually around 50 to 60 bottles.

This is the stuff.

http://gk007a0336.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/tennents.htm

Or this

http://www.lindisfarne-mead.co.uk/
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Old Apr 3rd, 2015, 01:40 AM
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I'd just bring American wine, either that stuff from California/Oregan or the amazing Canadian wines from BC or Niagra. I guess there are Europeans who don't drink (after a lifetime here I know 2) except for medical/religious requirements
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Old Apr 3rd, 2015, 03:07 AM
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How about something from Vera Bradley? American made.
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Old Apr 3rd, 2015, 11:51 AM
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An American cookbook is a bad idea for another reason: the measurements are in spoons, cups, pounds, and ounces. Europeans weigh their flour and sugar instead of measuring it, and they use grams and kilograms, not pounds and ounces.
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Old Apr 3rd, 2015, 11:57 AM
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Bilbo, I don't know where you are in Europe, but there are lots of Italians who don't drink. And those who do tend to drink very moderately. According to this article, and I've seen the statistic in other places as well, 40% of Italians are tee-totallers.

http://www.birrainforma.it/eurobarom...a-farlo-meglio

Apparently, it's the most abstemious country in Europe.

We went with a group from our town to an art show in Ravenna last weekend. After the show, we all went out to lunch. My husband and I were at a table of nine people. The waiter put two pitchers of wine on the table, each holding a litre. At the end of the meal, both pitchers were still half full. I wasn't counting, but I think four of our companions drank only water (including my husband, who has been a teetotaler all his life, and not for religious or medical reasons).
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Old Apr 3rd, 2015, 12:16 PM
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Yeah, but this guy isn't going to Italy. He's going to Spain where they do drink. But, he wants to bring a gift for two women. Olive oil would be more appropriate than wine.
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