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German speakers please translate: "EZ mit franz. Bett"

German speakers please translate: "EZ mit franz. Bett"

Old Jun 15th, 2005, 10:31 AM
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German speakers please translate: "EZ mit franz. Bett"

My german is not good...I've only been able to find basic guides and I am trying to book a room for 2 online. Even using the "translate to English" funcion, I have not been able to understand what "EZ mit franz. Bett" means. If I had to postulate I would say it meant single room with "some kind of" bed. Can anyone tell me what this is?
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 10:38 AM
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EZ = einzel zimmer
Franz. bett = Franzoesisch bett or French bed.

Commonly known as a double bed (I think it might be slightly narrower than a "US double bed" - - but clearly larger than a twin bed).

Best wishes,

Rex
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 10:39 AM
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Whoops - - since you had it right, I failed to clarify...

EZ = einzel zimmer (single room)
DZ = doppel zimmer (double room)
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 11:23 AM
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I've asked my sister who lives in Germany. A 'französizsches Bett' (or French bed or grand lit) means a double bed with a width of either 1.40 m, 1.60 m or 1.80 m.

German hotel terminology:
king size = 2m x 2m
Franz. Bett = 1.40/1.60/1.80 x 2m
zwei Betten = twin (2 beds of - usually 1m x 2m)
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 11:29 AM
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That's interesting MYriam, I have seen that term usually used in German-speaking countries, so I wondered. DO you know why they call any kind of a double bed, a French bed? I gather that is because German people do not historically sleep together in the same bed, even when married? I am actually curious, but someone from Germany told me that Germans do usually sleep in twin beds, that is what you usually find in German hotels.

Of course, that size doesn't narrow it down much, as those sizes are from double to kingsize.
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 11:35 AM
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Thanks, Myriam for correcting my incorrect gender (though I think you have inserted an extra &quot;z&quot; in front of the &quot;sch&quot; that doesn't belong there)of &quot;franz&ouml;sisches&quot;. Silly of me to not remember <i><b>das</b></i> Bett!

...just like <i>das Boot</i> - - I find that familiar things like this (movie title) are good ways to help remember...
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 11:37 AM
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In Switzerland, I've only seen single (twin) beds, french beds (see above) and double beds (two twin beds pushed together.)

Most couples sleep in a double bed but the linen stretches over both, making it look like a kingsize bed. As for duvets, I've seen twin size and king size. You mostly find two twin size duvets for the double beds.

I don't think there are any other choices.
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 11:51 AM
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@Rex
I made a mistake. The Z doesn't belong there!

@Christina
Wherever we slept in Germany (also in my sister's house), we've always had twin beds pushed together, usually made up like one kingsize bed but with each his own duvet (which is always too short!).
No idea why a double bed is called a &quot;French bed&quot;.
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Old Jun 15th, 2005, 01:58 PM
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&quot;Germans don't historically sleep together....&quot;????? Where did THAT come from?
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Old Jun 16th, 2005, 12:12 PM
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Well, Intrepid, if you are going to quote me, please note that was a question-- I was asking if that was the reason for this, I wasn't making a statement that it was true. So why ask &quot;where this came from&quot;???? as if I'm a moron, it came from me being curious.

As a matter of fact, however, I asked my friend who is German (born and raised there and lived there until about age 25) what the deal was with French beds, and she said that Germans, at least in the middle of 20th Century, didn't typically sleep together in the same bed. And that's why this was such a big deal and why they call double beds French beds. She said around the 1960s &quot;sexual revolution&quot;, they started copying mattresses they saw in France that were one big mattress for two people because that was seen as sexy (same with bidets, etc.), and it became a fad and thus they called them French beds. Until that time, she said the norm in German households was two separate mattresses for couples -- they would either have a little table between them to separate them (twin beds), or they would be in the same frame, but still two separate mattresses, separate blankets and separate linens. They thought one big mattress with one set of linens, etc., was sexier and more avant garde.

It's true that I've seen two separate mattresses in one frame very often in hotels in the Czech Republic and Poland, even 4* hotels.

She said that the size was most often around a queen size bed, but it could be anything. The thing that distinguishes a &quot;French bed&quot; in Germany is it being one mattress and one large sheet/blanket for two people, not two separate ones in a frame.

Anyway, that's what my correspondent in Hanau says.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 08:58 AM
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wow! Thank you everyone for your replies and the interesting history lesson. Now, off to find me a room....thanks again.
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Old Jun 24th, 2005, 09:02 AM
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Well, Christina, you are absolutely correct that I misinterpreted your &quot;question&quot; as a statement and I apologize.

More unfortunately, there is little I can do to change your incorrect thinking that I was implying you are a moron so I won't waste any more of your own energy or mine trying.
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Old Jul 3rd, 2005, 02:07 PM
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Polly/Gerard...

Please post your question here.
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