Go Back  Fodor's Travel Talk Forums > Destinations > Europe
Reload this Page >

German speakers- help with useful phrases.

German speakers- help with useful phrases.

Dec 21st, 2005, 10:43 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 9,472
In Switzerland, they like to test your Swiss-German pronunciation with: Küchekästli

pronounced: Kuechekaschtlie
make sure it sounds like you are getting ready to spit.
kleeblatt is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 10:45 AM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,017
It's "Hirsch heißt mein Vater", the goal is to pronouce it correctly (meaning "My dad's name is Hirsch"), and avoid saying "Here sh..s my dad".
logos999 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 01:40 PM
  #23  
rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 13,194
Actually, since you are traveling to Austria - - this is NOT shown on any of the Fodors pages - - you should be aware of...

Grüß Gott (or Gruess Gott) - - I think a vaguely literal translation would be "God's greetings" - - and used at all hours of the day as Hello, especially in a hotel, restuanrant or shop - - fairly specific to Austria

and

(maybe) less commonly in conversation, or at least as far as I can tell... but ubiquitous, especially among younger people in chat rooms and maybe other communications... Tschussi - - which is (I think) a bit of an all-purpose... "Bye" or "Kiss-kiss" or "Ciao" equivalent. Sometimes said with "Bis bald" (literally "Until soon"... or, in other words "See you soon" - - again, I think). Principally Austria-speak, I believe, but maybe also simply "jungSprache"...
rex is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 01:57 PM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,017
>Grüß Gott (or Gruess Gott)...fairly specific to Austria

Austria, Bavaria and B-Württemberg

>Tschussi
Tschüss comes from northern Germany and made it's way south down to Austria. Tschau (Ciao) is also used widely everywhere. Not Austria specific or Jugendsprache.
logos999 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 02:00 PM
  #25  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 331
I am told by an Austrian friend that "servuss" is a more common greeting than "groess Gut"...sort of the equivalent of "Hi!" Pronounced sehr voos, I think.
Robdaddy is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 02:06 PM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,017
"Grüß Gott" is formal, while "Servus" is informal and "typically" Austrian. You can also use it as a form of saying goodbye in Bavaria.
logos999 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 02:20 PM
  #27  
rex
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 13,194
Formal or not - - it seems that anyone entering shops is likely to hear it aplenty... and I never ever got any odd looks returning the greeting.
rex is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 04:07 PM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 1,264
Rex is "spot on" Those phrases are the most widely heard in Austria. I also hear some of my ife's cousins say " "SUPER" when describing something great! I get a kick out of that! I love the Austrian accent...much 'sweeter' than the harder German accent. Just one man's opinion...do not mean to start any flames here!

JOHN
bmw732002 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 04:53 PM
  #29  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,017
>Austrian accent
Same thing as in Germany, there's no typical "Austrian" accent as there's no typical German accent it's all about regional accents. So in Vienna it's different from Tyrol, Styria and so on. But southern is generally not as "hard" as northern. But you should ask some northerners about this ;-)
logos999 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 05:01 PM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 2,198
LGBooker, I hope you've been taking good notes.
"Zwischen zweiundzwanzig schwankenden Zwetschgenzweigen schweben zweiundzwanzig zwitschernde Schwalben. Zehn Ziegen ziehen zehn Zentner Zement zum Zahnarzt, zum zementieren zerbrochener Zähne" INDEED!
I'm sure that will help you find the restroom or get you on the right train.
AisleSeat is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 05:06 PM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,017
Now give us an English translation ;-) ;-)
logos999 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 05:18 PM
  #32  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 2,198
Don't know "Zwetschgenzweigen" but..

....between twenty-two varying Zwetschgenzweigen float twenty-two twittering swallows. Ten goats draw ten hundredweights cement to the dentist, to cement broken teeth
AisleSeat is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 05:21 PM
  #33  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,017
Actually, I believe all this helps a great deal in learning to pronounce the different types of "S"'s correctly. "s" is just like the English "s", but "z" and "ss" are different. And "z" doesn't have an equivalent in the English language, I think.
logos999 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 05:30 PM
  #34  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 9,017
O.K i'm trying now
In between twenty-two moving plumtree branches, twenty-two twittering swallows are floating.

Ten goats draw 500 kilos of cement to the dentist, to fix (cement) broken teeth.
logos999 is offline  
Dec 21st, 2005, 06:29 PM
  #35  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 28,672
Not a haiku, exactly, but it's rather poetic:

Among twenty-two
Waving plum branches
Hover twenty-two
Twittering swallows.
jahoulih is offline  
Dec 22nd, 2005, 07:22 AM
  #36  
lawchick
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
My favourite German word at the moment is "Drottel" - it's very effective when you shout it at other drivers.
 
Related Topics
Thread
Original Poster
Forum
Replies
Last Post
Daniel_Williams
Europe
24
Dec 17th, 2013 05:26 AM
jbjayhawk
Europe
5
Apr 19th, 2006 09:21 PM
damama
Europe
4
Dec 9th, 2004 07:07 PM
mzadnerb
Europe
16
Apr 7th, 2004 09:34 AM
epaulino
Europe
5
Jan 25th, 2004 04:19 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy -

FODOR'S VIDEO

All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:02 PM.