General itinerary advice- Paris

Mar 21st, 2003, 11:12 AM
  #21  
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Although some might think that sticking to an itinerary is too restrictive, I have found it to be quite liverating to wake up and know exactly where I'm going so I can dress accordingly. Having the metro stops and addresses listed on the itinerary really helps. Also, I list neighboring points of interest just in case we have the chance to promenade un peu. It is so frustrating to look over the guide books after being in particular are only to realize that I missed something only around the corner. I list winer bars, cafes, and tea salons also. If you need a spot of tea, might as well go somewhere fabulous. On on that note, tea salons are often a good choice for lunch. I'll never forget a cafe du monde replete with mint and an adorable teapot holder to die for. They usually have a quick salad or quiche ready and the cigarette smoke (and price) is low compared to the cafes.
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Mar 21st, 2003, 11:13 AM
  #22  
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Oh. I'm embarassed for all those typos. Sorry.
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Apr 21st, 2003, 03:24 AM
  #23  
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topping for recent inquiries
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Apr 21st, 2003, 06:27 AM
  #24  
 
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Thanks for the report--and thanks for topping it. This is a timeless post that should resurface every month or so for new readers. Your approach is wonderful. Although I've been to Paris 15 times myself and have somewhat similar rituals, rereading your report jogs a memory or two and suggests an idea or two. As they used to say in school--this is going into my permanenet file.
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Apr 21st, 2003, 02:16 PM
  #25  
ita
 
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Please give me some details on the Jackie O exhibit? What are the dates?
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Apr 21st, 2003, 06:15 PM
  #26  
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JM Vic - Thank you, happy to serve

Ita-I'm sorry I don't know if that exhibit is still on.

Oh, and I just found a mistake- make that the du monde rather than cafe (oops)
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Apr 25th, 2003, 07:32 PM
  #27  
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topping for the recent itinerary questions
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Aug 21st, 2004, 08:16 AM
  #28  
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Aug 21st, 2004, 08:47 AM
  #29  
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I like to pop in to this forum from time to time. One more thing to add. You can absolutely kill yourself trying to decide where to eat - with mixed results - or you can pick one or two of the true gastronomic greats, spend a worthwhile bundle there, and then just leave the rest of the meals to discovery. Having visited most of the best restaurants in Paris over the years, I always go back to the same two or three and love them dearly.
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Aug 21st, 2004, 09:06 AM
  #30  
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I'm more inclined to go to this place ( and have never ceased to be amazed) "L'Ami Louis
32 rue du Vertbois, 3rd (01.48.87.77.48)
M? Arts et Métiers. Open 12.15-2pm, 8-11pm Wed-Sun. Closed mid July-end Aug. Average 500F. Credit AmEx, DC, MC, V.
Though it's almost impossible not to fall in love with this stage-set of pre-war Paris - metal pipes venting a coal-burning stove still cross the gaslit dining room - the food is scandalously overpriced and often mediocre. This doesn't seem to bother the wealthy, mainly American clientele (this is where Chirac brought Clinton). The tradition is to start with the foie gras (270F), and then move on to crisp roast chicken and thin frites (350F), both cooked in goose fat. There are some excellent wines, and service is friendly. A place for those with money to burn."

Author: thit_cho
Date: 05/05/2004, 05:00 pm

Message: We had lunch at L'Ami Louis in February, and started with fois gras (average) and then had the roast chicken with a side of roasted potatoes. Lunch was around US$200 for the two of us, but it was WELL WORTH IT!! The chicken was incredible, but was made even more so by the atmosphere. Even the house wine was expensive. Its a very pricey bistro, but in my mind better than Balzar."

I also love Bofinger for choucroute.

Depending on when you go, definitely have cassoulet, confit, oysters (huitres) fresh shucked off the cart, choucroute, pate foie gras d'oie, and a steak with Bernaise sauce. Then you can die happy.
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