gardens, historic houses and b&b's

Mar 22nd, 2007, 11:35 AM
  #21  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 296
Historic houses Association:
http://www.hha.org.uk/metadot/index.pl

http://www.information-britain.co.uk/

The Treasure Houses of England
http://www.treasurehouses.co.uk/

There are beautiful not to touristy gardens near Kildummy Castle in Scotland:
http://www.kildrummy-castle-gardens.co.uk/index.html

Wilton House -I loved the grounds and the house.
http://www.wiltonhouse.co.uk/media_filming.htm
travfirst is offline  
Mar 22nd, 2007, 02:56 PM
  #22  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5,579
Westonbert in Tetbury, Gloucestershire is an arboretum rather than a garden but has a magnificent collection of rhododendrons which could be in their prime in May. We were there in the fall a few years ago - too early for the splendor of the maples.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/2rgmna
jsmith is offline  
Mar 23rd, 2007, 03:37 AM
  #23  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 52,380
hi, y'all

janisj and hopingtotravel:

all right I give in - it is lovely here in cornwall even when it's grey and miserable. this moring, having dropped DS at school in Truro, we drove over to the Roseland to collect some hens that we are buying to augement our "flock" [depleted to one hen and her mate], then back across the King Harry ferry [which crosses the Fal by means of chains] past Trelissick gardens [lovely any time of year] and home again via the wonderfully named "Come to Good" - the site of an ancient thatched puritan meeting house.

so what if the sun doesn't shine evry day!

regards, ann
annhig is offline  
Mar 23rd, 2007, 04:37 AM
  #24  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
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ann: See, you are convinced.

Funny - When I get to the Devon/Cornwall section of my "southern England" talks - I always mention the King Harry Ferry. 1) because its on a route I illustrate, but mainly 2) because it sounds funny and gets a laugh.
janisj is offline  
Mar 23rd, 2007, 06:37 AM
  #25  
 
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him janis,

mmm..it sounds funny..not quite sure why, to be honest, but I'll take your word for it.

when we first moved to Cornwall, and our children were somewhat younger that they are now, DS insisted that it was the "king hairy fairy" - now that was funny!

I'm impressed that you do talks on Cornwall - may i enquire to whom? I hope that you know that there is a new ferry -only the third in its history. the last one, which was showing its age, lasted over 30 years. the new one is very swish and quite a lot bigger.

The choir I sing with performed at the grand launching party - unfortunately? we were required to sing "speed bonny boat" as the vicar blessed the new vessel in the middle of the river, so we were drowned out by the noise of the engines!

as quite a lot of free beer had been consumed by then, i don't think anyone noticed us anyway.

there are new mussel beds up by the ferry, and a new pontoon, enabling tourists from Falmouth to take the boat up to Trelissick gardens. Unfortunately there are no buses, so they have to go back the same way, or swim.

and now the sun is shining. how lucky is that. hope it's shining on you too!

regards, ann
annhig is offline  
Mar 23rd, 2007, 09:15 AM
  #26  
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 63,540
Ann: It doesn't sound funny to me either.

But to an audience of Californians it sounds something like King Harry Fairy. The Foot ferry (foot fairy) in Stratford upon Avon gets the same reaction. And now I can say there is a new "swish" King Harry fairy

I don't give presentations solely about Devon/Cornwal - but a series of talks. 1 is about London and England in general; 1 covers southern England - basically the area from Kent to Cornwall to the Cotswolds and a bit more; 1 about Scotland; and 1 about gardens of England, Wales and Scotland. And then a Packing class.

I give 1 to 4 a month and average maybe 70-75 people at each (except for packing which pulls in 100+ just about every time)

Glad the sun is out again . . . . (another 75F day here)
janisj is offline  
Mar 24th, 2007, 05:52 AM
  #27  
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 5,579
A unusual garden we visited is the Westbury Court Garden 8 miles SW of Gloucester on the A48. It is a Dutch water garden. Check it out at this website or by googling. One of the sites has multiple photos. http://preview.tinyurl.com/2sbl33

We stayed at the Gunn Mill House BnB and were very pleased. The owners now have a new BnB, Lea House, on the A40 10 miles west of Gloucester. You can check both BnBs by googling.

BTW, we have made good use of "The Best Bed & Breakfast" published by The Globe Pequot Press. We've never been disappointed by our choice.
jsmith is offline  
Mar 24th, 2007, 11:07 AM
  #28  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 52,380
wow, janisj, that sounds good.

I'm pleased to have helped with the info about the KHF. I hadn't considered that the accent difference might contribute to the comedy of the name.

[as an aside, if you want to sample some very varied "english" accents, try tuning into the Cricket World cup commentary on BBC RAdio 5 Sport extra - everything from New Zealand to Canada, via south AFrica, India, Pakistan, sri Lanka and of course, the various accents of te hhost WEst Indian islands. I don't expect you to be interested in the cricket, but the accents are endlessly fascinating, IMO]

ebcutler - highly relevant to your quest is the fact that this is the year of the garden in the Cotswolds. I discovered this on my flying visit to Gloucester this weekend. You could easily fill your 2-3 weeks in and around this area in June/July.

regards,

ann

[and yes, Janis, if you do take up my suggestion, you are not halucinating if you hear the words "murder" and "Pakistan Cricket Coach Bob Woolmer" in the same sentence. The poor man was indeed murdered the night after Pakistan were surprisingly eliminated from the competition and the police are still hunting the culprit/s. Now, does someone want to start a thread about the dangers of being a cricket coach?]
annhig is offline  
Apr 9th, 2007, 10:32 AM
  #29  
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Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 93
So maybe we should plan a visit for 3 years instead of 3 weeks?

Thank you one and all. The posts are both helpful and inspiring!

Ellen
ebcutler is offline  
Apr 9th, 2007, 01:22 PM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 52,380
Hi, Ellen,

good news, the weather has been glorious here over Easter and looks like continuing so for some time to come.

As ever, three weeks anywhere is better than two!

regards, ann
annhig is offline  
Apr 9th, 2007, 01:40 PM
  #31  
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 109
My favorite B&B in Scotland is Melness in Inverness. I found it accidentally, in the dark and I loved it. The innkeeper is so friendly and makes you feel so welcome. The rooms look quaint and quiltlike, but the common areas are nice and very comfortable.

The other B&Bs in Scotland that I stayed in where super budget oriented, this time I hope to spend a little more and find more like the Melness.

I hope to find more like this on my trip set for next month. I won't be returning to Inverness as I'm trying to go to parts of Scotland that I didn't go to the first time, but if you are in the area, I suggest checking it out online: http://www.melnessie.co.uk/
Mademoiselle is offline  

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